2001 Census Area Profiles

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Profile for Statistical Area Classification, 2001 Census

About this variable: Profile for Canada, Provinces and Territories (348)

Definition

No definition is available for this variable.

Values

  1. Total population - 100% Data Footnote 1
  2. 0-4 years
  3. 5-14 years
  4. 15-19 years
  5. 20-24 years
  6. 25-44 years
  7. 45-54 years
  8. 55-64 years
  9. 65-74 years
  10. 75-84 years
  11. 85 years and over
  12. Median age of the population
  13. % of the population 15 years and over
  14. Percentage distribution - Total population
  15. Percentage distribution - 0-4 years
  16. Percentage distribution - 5-14 years
  17. Percentage distribution - 15-19 years
  18. Percentage distribution - 20-24 years
  19. Percentage distribution - 25-44 years
  20. Percentage distribution - 45-54 years
  21. Percentage distribution - 55-64 years
  22. Percentage distribution - 65-74 years
  23. Percentage distribution - 75-84 years
  24. Percentage distribution - 85 years and over
  25. Total population 15 years and over by legal marital status - 100% Data Footnote 25
  26. Never married (single) Footnote 26
  27. Legally married (and not separated) Footnote 27
  28. Separated, but still legally married Footnote 28
  29. Divorced Footnote 29
  30. Widowed Footnote 30
  31. Percentage distribution - Total population 15 years and over by legal marital status
  32. Percentage distribution - Never married (single)
  33. Percentage distribution - Legally married (and not separated)
  34. Percentage distribution - Separated, but still legally married
  35. Percentage distribution - Divorced
  36. Percentage distribution - Widowed
  37. Total population 15 years and over by common-law status - 100% Data Footnote 37
  38. Not in a common-law relationship
  39. In a common-law relationship
  40. Percentage distribution - Total population 15 years and over by common-law status
  41. Percentage distribution - Not in a common-law relationship
  42. Percentage distribution - In a common-law relationship
  43. Total Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal population - 20% Sample Data
  44. Aboriginal identity population Footnote 44
  45. North American Indian single response Footnote 45
  46. Métis single response
  47. Inuit single response
  48. Multiple Aboriginal responses
  49. Aboriginal responses not included elsewhere Footnote 49
  50. Non-Aboriginal identity population
  51. Percentage distribution - Total Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal population
  52. Percentage distribution - Aboriginal identity population
  53. Percentage distribution - North American Indian single responses
  54. Percentage distribution - Métis single responses
  55. Percentage distribution - Inuit single responses
  56. Percentage distribution - Multiple Aboriginal responses
  57. Percentage distribution - Aboriginal responses not included elsewhere
  58. Percentage distribution - Non-Aboriginal identity population
  59. Total - Mother tongue - 20% Sample Data Footnote 59
  60. English
  61. French
  62. Non-official language
  63. English and French
  64. English and non-official language
  65. French and non-official language
  66. English, French and non-official language
  67. Percentage distribution -Total - Mother tongue
  68. Percentage distribution - English
  69. Percentage distribution - French
  70. Percentage distribution - Non-official language
  71. Percentage distribution - English and French
  72. Percentage distribution - English and non-official language
  73. Percentage distribution - French and non-official language
  74. Percentage distribution - English, French and non-official language
  75. Total population 5 years and over by mobility status 5 years ago - 20% Sample Data Footnote 75
  76. Non-movers
  77. Movers
  78. Non-migrants
  79. Migrants
  80. Internal migrants
  81. Intraprovincial migrants
  82. Interprovincial migrants
  83. External migrants
  84. Percentage distribution - Total population 5 years and over by mobility status 5 years ago
  85. Percentage distribution - Non-movers
  86. Percentage distribution - Movers
  87. Percentage distribution - Non-migrants
  88. Percentage distribution - Migrants
  89. Percentage distribution - Internal migrants
  90. Percentage distribution - Intraprovincial migrants
  91. Percentage distribution - Interprovincial migrants
  92. Percentage distribution - External migrants
  93. Total population by immigrant status - 20% Sample Data
  94. Canadian-born population Footnote 94
  95. Foreign-born population Footnote 95
  96. Immigrated before 1991
  97. Immigrated between 1991 and 2001 Footnote 97
  98. Non-permanent residents Footnote 98
  99. Percentage distribution - Total population by immigrant status
  100. Percentage distribution - Canadian-born population
  101. Percentage distribution - Foreign-born population
  102. Percentage distribution - Immigrated before 1991
  103. Percentage distribution - Immigrated between 1991 and 2001
  104. Percentage distribution - Non-permanent residents
  105. Total population by visible minority groups - 20% Sample Data Footnote 105
  106. Total visible minority population
  107. Chinese
  108. South Asian
  109. Black
  110. Filipino
  111. Latin American
  112. Southeast Asian
  113. Arab
  114. West Asian
  115. Korean
  116. Japanese
  117. Visible minority, n.i.e. Footnote 117
  118. Multiple visible minorities Footnote 118
  119. All others Footnote 119
  120. Percentage distribution - Total population by visible minority groups
  121. Percentage distribution - Total visible minority population
  122. Percentage distribution - Chinese
  123. Percentage distribution - South Asian
  124. Percentage distribution - Black
  125. Percentage distribution - Filipino
  126. Percentage distribution - Latin American
  127. Percentage distribution - Southeast Asian
  128. Percentage distribution - Arab
  129. Percentage distribution - West Asian
  130. Percentage distribution - Korean
  131. Percentage distribution - Japanese
  132. Percentage distribution - Visible minority, n.i.e.
  133. Percentage distribution - Multiple visible minorities
  134. Percentage distribution - All others
  135. Total population 15 and over attending school full time - 20% Sample Data
  136. Age group 15-19 attending full time Footnote 136
  137. Age group 20-24 attending full time
  138. Total population 15 years and over attending school part time- 20% Sample Data
  139. Age group 15-19 attending part time Footnote 139
  140. Age group 20-24 attending part time
  141. Percentage distribution - Total population 15 years and over attending school full time
  142. Percentage distribution - Age group 15-19 attending full time
  143. Percentage distribution - Age group 20-24 attending full time
  144. Percentage distribution - Total population 15 years and over attending school part time
  145. Percentage distribution - Age group 15-19 attending part time
  146. Percentage distribution - Age group 20-24 attending part time
  147. Total population aged 20-34 by highest level of schooling - 20% Sample Data
  148. Population aged 20-34 with less than a high school graduation certificate
  149. Population aged 20-34 with a high school graduation certificate and/or some postsecondary Footnote 149
  150. Population aged 20-34 with a trades certificate or diploma
  151. Population aged 20-34 with a college certificate or diploma Footnote 151
  152. Population aged 20-34 with a university certificate, diploma or degree
  153. Percentage distribution - Total population aged 20-34 by highest level of schooling
  154. Percentage distribution - Population aged 20-34 with less than a high school graduation certificate
  155. Percentage distribution - Population aged 20-34 with a high school graduation certificate and/or some postsecondary
  156. Percentage distribution - Population aged 20-34 with a trades certificate or diploma
  157. Percentage distribution - Population aged 20-34 with a college certificate or diploma
  158. Percentage distribution - Population aged 20-34 with a university certificate, diploma or degree
  159. Total population aged 35-44 by highest level of schooling - 20% Sample Data
  160. Population aged 35-44 with less than a high school graduation certificate
  161. Population aged 35-44 with a high school graduation certificate and/or some postsecondary Footnote 161
  162. Population aged 35-44 with a trades certificate or diploma
  163. Population aged 35-44 with a college certificate or diploma Footnote 163
  164. Population aged 35-44 with a university certificate, diploma or degree
  165. Percentage distribution - Total population aged 35-44 by highest level of schooling
  166. Percentage distribution - Population aged 35-44 with less than a high school graduation certificate
  167. Percentage distribution - Population aged 35-44 with a high school graduation certificate and/or some postsecondary
  168. Percentage distribution - Population aged 35-44 with a trades certificate or diploma
  169. Percentage distribution - Population aged 35-44 with a college certificate or diploma
  170. Percentage distribution - Population aged 35-44 with a university certificate, diploma or degree
  171. Total population aged 45-64 by highest level of schooling - 20% Sample Data
  172. Population aged 45-64 with less than a high school graduation certificate
  173. Population aged 45-64 with a high school graduation certificate and/or some postsecondary Footnote 173
  174. Population aged 45-64 with a trades certificate or diploma
  175. Population aged 45-64 with a college certificate or diploma Footnote 175
  176. Population aged 45-64 with a university certificate, diploma or degree
  177. Percentage distribution - Total population aged 45-64 by highest level of schooling
  178. Percentage distribution - Population aged 45-64 with less than a high school graduation certificate
  179. Percentage distribution - Population aged 45-64 with a high school graduation certificate and/or some postsecondary
  180. Percentage distribution - Population aged 45-64 with a trades certificate or diploma
  181. Percentage distribution - Population aged 45-64 with a college certificate or diploma
  182. Percentage distribution - Population aged 45-64 with a university certificate, diploma or degree
  183. Persons reporting hours of unpaid work Footnote 183
  184. Persons reporting hours of unpaid housework Footnote 184
  185. Persons reporting hours looking after children, without pay Footnote 185
  186. Persons reporting hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors Footnote 186
  187. Total population 15 years and over- 20% Sample Data
  188. In the labour force
  189. Employed
  190. Unemployed
  191. Not in the labour force
  192. Participation rate Footnote 192
  193. Employment rate Footnote 193
  194. Unemployment rate Footnote 194
  195. Total labour force 15 years and over - 20% Sample Data
  196. Class of worker - Not applicable Footnote 196
  197. All classes of worker Footnote 197
  198. Paid workers
  199. Employees
  200. Self-employed (incorporated)
  201. Self-employed (unincorporated)
  202. Unpaid family workers
  203. Percentage distribution - Total labour force 15 years and over
  204. Percentage distribution - Class of worker - Not applicable
  205. Percentage distribution - All classes of worker
  206. Percentage distribution - Paid workers
  207. Percentage distribution - Employees
  208. Percentage distribution - Self-employed (incorporated)
  209. Percentage distribution - Self-employed (unincorporated)
  210. Percentage distribution - Unpaid family workers
  211. Total Labour Force - 20% Sample Data
  212. Occupation and industry - Not applicable Footnote 212
  213. Total experienced labour force 15 years and over by occupation - 2001 National Occupational Classification for Statistics- 20% Sample Data Footnote 213
  214. Management Occupations
  215. Business, finance and administrative occupations
  216. Natural and applied sciences and related occupations
  217. Health occupations
  218. Social science, education, government service and religion
  219. Art, culture, recreation and sport
  220. Sales and service occupations
  221. Trades, transport and equipment operators and related occupations
  222. Occupations unique to primary industry
  223. Occupations unique to processing, manufacturing and utilities
  224. Percentage distribution - Total experienced labour force 15 years and over by occupation - 2001 National Occupational Classification for Statistics
  225. Percentage distribution - Management occupations
  226. Percentage distribution - Business, finance and administrative occupations
  227. Percentage distribution - Natural and applied sciences and related occupations
  228. Percentage distribution - Health occupations
  229. Percentage distribution - Social science, education, government service and religion
  230. Percentage distribution - Art, culture, recreation and sport
  231. Percentage distribution - Sales and service occupations
  232. Percentage distribution - Trades, transport and equipment operators and related occupations
  233. Percentage distribution - Occupations unique to primary industry
  234. Percentage distribution - Occupations unique to processing, manufacturing and utilities
  235. Total experienced labour force 15 years and over by industry - 1997 North American Industry Classification System - 20% Sample Data Footnote 235
  236. Agriculture and other resource-based industries
  237. Manufacturing and construction industries
  238. Wholesale and retail trade
  239. Finance and real estate
  240. Health and education
  241. Business services
  242. Other services
  243. Percentage distribution - Total experienced labour force 15 years and over by industry - 1997 North American Industry Classification System
  244. Percentage distribution - Agriculture and other resource-based industries
  245. Percentage distribution - Manufacturing and construction industries
  246. Percentage distribution - Wholesale and retail trade
  247. Percentage distribution - Finance and real estate
  248. Percentage distribution - Health and education
  249. Percentage distribution - Business services
  250. Percentage distribution - Other services
  251. Total employed labour force 15 years and over by place of work status - 20% Sample Data Footnote 251
  252. Worked at home
  253. Worked outside Canada
  254. No fixed workplace address
  255. Worked at usual place of work
  256. Percentage distribution - Total employed labour force 15 years and over by place of work status
  257. Percentage distribution - Worked at home
  258. Percentage distribution - Worked outside Canada
  259. Percentage distribution - No fixed workplace address
  260. Percentage distribution - Worked at usual place of work
  261. Total employed labour force 15 years and over by mode of transportation - 20% Sample Data Footnote 261
  262. Car, truck, van, as driver
  263. Car, truck, van, as passenger
  264. Public transit
  265. Walked or bicycled
  266. Other method
  267. Percentage distribution - Total employed labour force 15 years and over by mode of transportation
  268. Percentage distribution - Car, truck, van, as driver
  269. Percentage distribution - Car, truck, van, as passenger
  270. Percentage distribution - Public transit
  271. Percentage distribution - Walked or bicycled
  272. Percentage distribution - Other method
  273. Population 15 years and over who worked since 2000 by language used most often at work - 20% Sample Data Footnote 273
  274. English
  275. French
  276. Non-official language
  277. English and French
  278. English and non-official language
  279. French and non-official language
  280. English, French and non-official language
  281. Percentage distribution - Population 15 years and over who worked since 2000 by language used most often at work
  282. Percentage distribution - English
  283. Percentage distribution - French
  284. Percentage distribution - Non-official language
  285. Percentage distribution - English and French
  286. Percentage distribution - English and non-official language
  287. Percentage distribution - French and non-official language
  288. Percentage distribution - English, French and non-official language
  289. Total number of census families in private households - 20% Sample Data
  290. Number of married-couple families
  291. Average number of persons in married-couple families
  292. Number of common-law-couple families Footnote 292
  293. Average number of persons in common-law-couple families
  294. Number of lone-parent families Footnote 294
  295. Average number of persons in lone-parent families
  296. Number of female lone-parent families
  297. Average number of persons in female lone-parent families
  298. Number of male lone-parent families
  299. Average number of persons in male lone-parent families
  300. Median family income $ - All census families Footnote 300
  301. Median family income $ - Couple families Footnote 301
  302. Median family income $ - Lone-parent families
  303. Total number of private households - 20% Sample Data
  304. Households containing a couple (married or common-law) with children Footnote 304
  305. Households containing a couple (married or common-law) without children Footnote 305
  306. One-person households
  307. Other household types
  308. Median household income $ - All households
  309. Median household income $ - One-person households
  310. Median household income $ - Two-or-more-person households
  311. Number of rented dwellings Footnote 311
  312. Average gross monthly payments for rented dwellings $
  313. Number of owner-occupied dwellings Footnote 313
  314. Average monthly payments for owner-occupied dwellings $
  315. Total number of occupied private dwellings - 20% Sample Data Footnote 315
  316. Number of owned dwellings
  317. Number of rented dwellings
  318. Number of dwellings constructed before 1991
  319. Number of dwellings constructed between 1991 and 2001
  320. Average value of dwelling $
  321. Total population 15 years and over with employment income - 20% Sample Data Footnote 321
  322. Average employment income $ Footnote 322
  323. Median employment income $ Footnote 323
  324. Standard error of average employment income $ Footnote 324
  325. Worked full year, full time Footnote 325
  326. Average employment income (worked full year, full time) Footnote 326
  327. Median employment income (worked full year, full time) $ Footnote 327
  328. Standard error of average employment income (worked full year, full time) $ Footnote 328
  329. Total - Economic families - 20% Sample Data Footnote 329
  330. Low income
  331. Other
  332. Incidence of low income in 2000 % Footnote 332
  333. Total - Unattached individuals 15 years and over Footnote 333
  334. Low income
  335. Other
  336. Incidence of low income in 2000 % Footnote 336
  337. Total - Population in private households Footnote 337
  338. Low income
  339. Other
  340. Incidence of low income in 2000 % Footnote 340
  341. Total population 15 years and over with income - 20% Sample Data Footnote 341
  342. Average total income of persons 15 years of age and over $
  343. Median total income of persons 15 years of age and over $
  344. Standard error of average total income of persons 15 years of age and over $
  345. Composition of total income (100%) Footnote 345
  346. Earnings - % of income
  347. Government transfers - % of income
  348. Other money income - % of income

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 15, 2001). Includes institutional residents.

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Footnote 25

Refers to the legal conjugal status of a person.

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Footnote 26

Persons who have never married (including all persons less than 15 years of age) and persons whose marriage has been annulled and who have not remarried.



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Footnote 27

Persons whose husband or wife is living, unless the couple is separated or a divorce has been obtained.



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Footnote 28

Persons currently married, but who are no longer living with their spouse (for any reason other than illness or work) and have not obtained a divorce.





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Footnote 29

Persons who have obtained a legal divorce and who have not remarried.





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Footnote 30

Persons who have lost their spouse through death and who have not remarried.







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Footnote 37

Refers to two people of the opposite sex or of the same sex who live together as a couple, but who are not legally married to each other.

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Footnote 44

This is a grouping of the total population into non-Aboriginal or Aboriginal population, with Aboriginal persons further divided into Aboriginal groups, based on their responses to three questions on the 2001 Census form. Included in the Aboriginal population are those persons who reported identifying with at least one Aboriginal group, that is, 'North American Indian', 'Métis' or 'Inuit (Eskimo)', and/or who reported being a Treaty Indian or a Registered Indian, as defined by the Indian Act of Canada, and/or who reported they were members of an Indian Band or First Nation.

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Footnote 45

Users should be aware that the counts for this item are more affected than most by the incomplete enumeration of certain Indian reserves and Indian settlements. The extent of the impact will depend on the geographic area under study. In 2001, a total of 30 Indian reserves and Indian settlements were incompletely enumerated by the census. The populations of these 30 communities are not included in the census counts.

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Footnote 49

Includes those who identified themselves as Registered Indians and/or Band members without Aboriginal identity response.

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Footnote 59

Refers to the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood by the individual at the time of the census.

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Footnote 75

Refers to the relationship between a person's usual place of residence on Census Day and his or her usual place of residence five years earlier. A person is classified as a non-mover if no difference exists. Otherwise, a person is classified as a mover and this categorization is called Mobility Status (5 Years Ago). Within the movers category, a further distinction is made between non-migrants and migrants; this difference is called migration status. Non-movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at the same address as the one at which they resided five years earlier. Movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at a different address than the one at which they resided five years earlier. Non-migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living at a different address, but in the same census subdivision (CSD) as the one they lived in five years earlier. Migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were residing in a different CSD five years earlier (internal migrants) or who were living outside Canada five years earlier (external migrants). Intraprovincial migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living in a different census subdivision than the one in which they resided five years earlier, in the same province. Interprovincial migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living in a different census subdivision than the one in which they resided five years earlier, in a different province.

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Footnote 94

Includes persons born in Canada as well as a small number of persons born outside Canada who are Canadian citizens by birth.

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Footnote 95

This population is also referred to as the immigrant population, which is defined as persons who are, or have ever been, landed immigrants in Canada.

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Footnote 97

Includes data up to Census Day, May 15, 2001.

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Footnote 98

Refers to persons who, at the time of the census, held a student or employment authorization, Minister's permit or who were refugee claimants, as well as family members living with them.

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Footnote 105

Refers to the visible minority group to which the respondent belongs. The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as 'persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour'.

The visible minority population includes the following groups: Chinese, South Asian, Black, Filipino, Latin American, Southeast Asian, Arab, West Asian, Korean, Japanese, Visible Minority, n.i.e. and Multiple Visible Minorities.

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Footnote 117

Includes respondents who reported a write-in response classified as a visible minority such as 'Polynesian', 'Guyanese', 'Mauritian', etc.

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Footnote 118

Includes respondents who reported more than one visible minority group by checking two or more mark-in circles, e.g. 'Black' and 'South Asian'.

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Footnote 119

Includes respondents who reported 'Yes' to Question 18 (Aboriginal self-reporting) as well as respondents who were not considered to be members of a visible minority group.

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Footnote 136

The overall data quality of the 2001 Census education variables is acceptable. However, users of the 2001 Census data on school attendance are cautioned that the counts for the category of 15 to 19 year olds not attending school may be too high. The proportion of persons aged 15 to 19 who indicated they had not attended school during the school year prior to the census increased from 18% in 1996 to 23% in 2001. This variable requires further research.

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Footnote 139

The overall data quality of the 2001 Census education variables is acceptable. However, users of the 2001 Census data on school attendance are cautioned that the counts for the category of 15 to 19 year olds not attending school may be too high. The proportion of persons aged 15 to 19 who indicated they had not attended school during the school year prior to the census increased from 18% in 1996 to 23% in 2001. This variable requires further research.

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Footnote 149

Includes persons who have attended courses at postsecondary institutions and who may or may not have a high school graduation certificate. Excludes persons with a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. Since 1981, 'postsecondary' refers to years of schooling completed at university or at institutions other than a university, a secondary (high) school or an elementary school. Examples of postsecondary institutions include community colleges, institutes of technology, CEGEPs, private trade schools, private business colleges and schools of nursing.

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Footnote 151

Referred to as 'Other non-university certificate or diploma' in previous censuses, this sector includes non-degree-granting institutions such as community colleges, CEGEPs, private business colleges and technical institutes.

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Footnote 161

Includes persons who have attended courses at postsecondary institutions and who may or may not have a high school graduation certificate. Excludes persons with a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. Since 1981, 'postsecondary' refers to years of schooling completed at university or at institutions other than a university, a secondary (high) school or an elementary school. Examples of postsecondary institutions include community colleges, institutes of technology, CEGEPs, private trade schools, private business colleges and schools of nursing.

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Footnote 163

Referred to as 'Other non-university certificate or diploma' in previous censuses, this sector includes non-degree-granting institutions such as community colleges, CEGEPs, private business colleges and technical institutes.

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Footnote 173

Includes persons who have attended courses at postsecondary institutions and who may or may not have a high school graduation certificate. Excludes persons with a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. Since 1981, 'postsecondary' refers to years of schooling completed at university or at institutions other than a university, a secondary (high) school or an elementary school. Examples of postsecondary institutions include community colleges, institutes of technology, CEGEPs, private trade schools, private business colleges and schools of nursing.

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Footnote 175

Referred to as 'Other non-university certificate or diploma' in previous censuses, this sector includes non-degree-granting institutions such as community colleges, CEGEPs, private business colleges and technical institutes.

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Footnote 183

Includes all persons reporting hours of unpaid housework; hours looking after children, without pay; and hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors.

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Footnote 184

Refers to the number of persons reporting hours of unpaid housework, yard work or home maintenance in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 15, 2001). Unpaid housework includes work for one's own household or for the household of others.

Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents.

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Footnote 185

Refers to the number of persons reporting hours spent looking after their own or someone else's children, without pay, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 15, 2001).

Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents.

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Footnote 186

Refers to the number of persons reporting hours spent providing unpaid care or assistance to seniors in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 15, 2001).

Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents.


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Footnote 192

Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 15, 2001), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

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Footnote 193

Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 15, 2001), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

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Footnote 194

Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 15, 2001).

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Footnote 196

Unemployed persons 15 years and over who have never worked for pay or in self-employment or who had last worked prior to January 1, 2000.

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Footnote 197

Refers to the experienced labour force: persons who, during the week prior to Census Day, were employed or unemployed who worked for pay or in self-employment since January 1, 2000.


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Footnote 212

Unemployed persons 15 years and over who have never worked for pay or in self-employment or who had last worked prior to January 1, 2000 only.

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Footnote 213

Refers to the experienced labour force: persons who, during the week prior to Census Day, were employed or unemployed who worked for pay or in self-employment since January 1, 2000.

The 2001 National Occupational Classification for Statistics (2001 NOC-S) is a revision of the 1991 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC). The 1991 SOC was used to code occupation data from the 1991 and 1996 Censuses.

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Footnote 235

Refers to the experienced labour force: persons who, during the week prior to Census Day, were employed or unemployed who worked for pay or in self-employment since January 1, 2000.

The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) is a classification system developed under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) by the statistical agencies of Canada, Mexico and the United States. It is designed to produce industry statistics that are comparable among the three countries by providing common definitions of their industrial structure. In Canada, the NAICS replaces the 1980 Standard Industrial Classification (1980 SIC) used to code industry data in the 1986, 1991 and 1996 Censuses.


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Footnote 251

Refers to the place of work of non-institutional residents 15 years of age and over who worked at some time since January 1, 2000. The variable usually relates to the individual's job held in the week prior to enumeration. However, if the person did not work during that week but had worked at some time since January 1, 2000, the information relates to the job held longest during that period.

Worked at home - Persons whose job is located in the same building as their place of residence, persons who live and work on the same farm, building superintendents and teleworkers who spend most of their work week working at home.

Worked outside Canada - Persons who work at a location outside Canada. This can include diplomats, Armed Forces personnel and other persons enumerated abroad. This category also includes recent immigrants who may not currently be employed, but whose job of longest duration since January 1, 2000, was held outside Canada.

No fixed workplace address - Persons who do not go from home to the same workplace location at the beginning of each shift. Such persons include building and landscape contractors, travelling salespersons, independent truck drivers, etc.

Worked at the address specified below - Persons who are not included in the categories described above and who report to the same (usual) workplace location at the beginning of each shift are included here.

Respondents are asked to provide the street address, city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve, province/territory and postal code of their workplace. If the full street address was not known, the name of the building or nearest street intersection could be substituted. Teleworkers who spend less than one-half of their workweek working at their home office are asked to report the full address of their employer. Persons whose workplace location varied, but who reported regularly to an employer's address at the beginning of each shift, are asked to report the full address of the employer.

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Footnote 261

Refers to the mode of transportation to work of non-institutional residents 15 years of age and over who worked at some time since January 1, 2000. Persons who indicate in the place of work question that they either had no fixed workplace address, or specified a usual workplace address, are asked to identify the mode of transportation they most frequently use to commute from home to work. The variable usually relates to the individual's job in the week prior to enumeration. However, if the person did not work during that week but had worked at some time since January 1, 2000, the information relates to the job held longest during that period. Persons who use more than one mode of transportation are asked to identify the single mode they use for most of the travel distance. As a result, the question provides data on the primary mode of transportation to work. The question does not measure multiple modes of transportation, nor does it measure the seasonal variation in mode of transportation or trips made for purposes other than the commute from home to work.

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Footnote 273

Refers to the language used most often at work by the individual at the time of the census. Other languages used at work on a regular basis are also collected.







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Footnote 292

In 2001, the category includes both opposite-sex and same-sex common-law couples.

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Footnote 294

For the 2001 Census, a change in the concept of census family has resulted in a higher number of lone-parent families compared to the number established by the 1996 Census. There is an apparent increase of approximately 10% in the number of lone-parent families between 1996 and 2001 due solely to the change in concept. For example, at the Canada level, figures show a 15.3% increase in lone-parent families from 1996 to 2001. The conceptual change has resulted in an increase of 10.1 percentage points, leaving a real increase of 5.2%.

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Footnote 300

The median income of census families and non-family persons is calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

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Footnote 301

The median family income of couple families is calculated using the income of married-couple families, and opposite-sex and same-sex common-law-couple families.

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Footnote 304

Refers to couple family households with at least one child under 25 years of age.

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Footnote 305

Includes couple family households with all children 25 years of age and over.

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Footnote 311

Refers to a non-reserve private dwelling, other than one situated on a farm and occupied by a farm operator, which is not owned by some member of the household.

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Footnote 313

Refers to a non-reserve private dwelling, other than one situated on a farm and occupied by a farm operator, which is owned or being bought by some member of the household.

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Footnote 315

Refers to a private dwelling in which a person or a group of persons are permanently residing. Also included are private dwellings whose usual residents are temporarily absent on Census Day. Unless otherwise specified, all data in housing products are for occupied private dwellings, rather than for unoccupied private dwellings or dwellings occupied solely by foreign and/or temporary residents.

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Footnote 321

Earner or Employment Income Recipient - Refers to a person 15 years of age and over who received wages and salaries, net income from a non-farm unincorporated business and/or professional practice, and/or net farm self-employment income during calendar year 2000.

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Footnote 322

For persons with employment income.

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Footnote 323

For persons with employment income.

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Footnote 324

For persons with employment income.

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Footnote 325

Worked 49 to 52 weeks in the reference year, mostly full time.

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Footnote 326

For persons with employment income.

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Footnote 327

For persons with employment income.

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Footnote 328

For persons with employment income.

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Footnote 329

Economic Family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common-law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire. Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Incidence of Low Income Part A - Plain Language Definition Percentage of economic families or unattached individuals who spend 20% more than average on food, shelter and clothing. Part B - Detailed Definition The incidence of low income is the proportion or percentage of economic families or unattached individuals in a given classification below the low income cut-offs. These incidence rates are calculated from unrounded estimates of economic families and unattached individuals 15 years of age and over. Income Status Part A - Plain Language Definition Not applicable Part B - Detailed Definition Refers to the position of an economic family or an unattached individual 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income cut-offs (LICOs). Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs) Part A - Plain Language Definition Income levels at which families or unattached individuals spend 20% more than average on food, shelter and clothing. Part B - Detailed Definition Measures of low income known as low income cut-offs (LICOs) were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families. Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. These data indicated that Canadian families spent, on average, 42% in 1969, 38.5% in 1978, 36.2% in 1986 and 34.7% in 1992 of their total income on basic necessities. Since 1992, data from the expenditure survey have indicated that this proportion has remained fairly stable. By adding the original difference of 20 percentage points to the basic level of expenditure on necessities, new low income cut-offs were set at income levels differentiated by family size and degree of urbanization. Since 1992, these cut-offs have been updated yearly by changes in the consumer price index.

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Footnote 332

Calculated from rounded data.



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Footnote 333

Unattached individuals - Refers to household members who are not members of an economic family. Persons living alone are included in this category.

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Footnote 336

Calculated from rounded data.



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Footnote 337

Private Household - Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.

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Footnote 340

Calculated from rounded data.



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Footnote 341

Refers to the total money income received during calendar year 2000 by persons 15 years of age and over.

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Footnote 345

The Percentages shown in tables providing the composition of total income are based upon aggregate source amounts (for example, employment income, government transfer payments or other income) that are generated, rounded and subjected to independent suppression for confidentiality reasons prior to calculation. Due to this calculation method, the sum of the Percentages may not add to 100.0%.

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