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2006 Community Profiles

Definitions and symbols


Definitions:

1. 2006 and 2001 population based on 100% data

Statistics Canada is taking additional measures to protect the privacy of all Canadians and the confidentiality of the data they provide to us. Starting with the 2001 Census, some population counts are adjusted in order to ensure confidentiality.

1. 2006 and 2001 population based on 100% data

Statistics Canada is taking additional measures to protect the privacy of all Canadians and the confidentiality of the data they provide to us. Starting with the 2001 Census, some population counts are adjusted in order to ensure confidentiality.

2. Total private dwellings

For the 2006 Census, a private dwelling is defined as: A set of living quarters designed for or converted for human habitation in which a person or group of persons reside or could reside. In addition, a private dwelling must have a source of heat or power and must be an enclosed space that provides shelter from the elements, as evidenced by complete and enclosed walls and roof and by doors and windows that provide protection from wind, rain and snow.
Private dwellings

3. Private dwellings occupied by usual residents

A separate set of living quarters which has a private entrance either directly from outside or from a common hall, lobby, vestibule or stairway leading to the outside, and in which a person or a group of persons live permanently.
Private dwellings occupied by usual residents

4. Age - 100% data

Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from date of birth.

5. Median age

The median age is an age 'x', such that exactly one half of the population is older than 'x' and the other half is younger than 'x'.

6. Common-law status - 100% data

Refers to persons who live together as a couple but who are not legally married to each other. These persons can be of the opposite sex or of the same sex.

7. Legal marital status - 100% data

Refers to the legal conjugal status of a person.

8. Never legally married (single)

Persons who have never married (including all persons less than 15 years of age) and persons whose marriage has been annulled and who have not remarried.

9. Legally married (and not separated)

Persons whose spouse is living, unless the couple is separated or a divorce has been obtained. In 2006, legally married same-sex couples are included in this category.

10. Separated, but still legally married

Persons currently married, but who are no longer living with their spouse (for any reason other than illness or work) and have not obtained a divorce.

11. Divorced

Persons who have obtained a legal divorce and who have not remarried.

12. Widowed

Persons who have lost their spouse through death and who have not remarried.

13. Occupied private dwellings - 20 % sample data

'Occupied private dwellings' refers to a private dwelling in which a person or a group of persons are permanently residing. Also included are private dwellings whose usual residents are temporarily absent on Census Day.

14. Apartments in buildings with fewer than five storeys - as a % of total occupied private dwellings

In 2006, improvements to the enumeration process and changes in structural type classification affect the historical comparability of the 'structural type of dwelling' variable. In 2006, 'apartment or flat in a duplex' replaces 'apartment or flat in a detached duplex' and includes duplexes attached to other dwellings or buildings. This is a change from the 2001 Census where duplexes attached to other dwellings or buildings were classified as an 'apartment in a building that has fewer than five storeys'.

14. Apartments, duplex - as a % of total occupied private dwellings

In 2006, improvements to the enumeration process and changes in structural type classification affect the historical comparability of the 'structural type of dwelling' variable. In 2006, 'apartment or flat in a duplex' replaces 'apartment or flat in a detached duplex' and includes duplexes attached to other dwellings or buildings. This is a change from the 2001 Census where duplexes attached to other dwellings or buildings were classified as an 'apartment in a building that has fewer than five storeys'.

15. Other dwellings - as a % of total occupied private dwellings

'Other occupied private dwellings' includes other single attached houses and movable dwellings such as mobile homes and other movable dwellings such as houseboats and railroad cars.

16. Number of owned dwellings

'Owned occupied private dwellings' refers to a private dwelling which is owned or being purchased by some member of the household. A dwelling is classified as 'owned' even if it is not fully paid for, such as one which has a mortgage or some other claim on it.

17. Number of rented dwellings

'Rented occupied private dwellings' refers to a private dwelling, even if it is provided without cash rent or at a reduced rent, or if the dwelling is part of a cooperative.

18. Number of dwellings constructed between 1986 and 2006

Includes data up to May 16, 2006.

19. Dwellings with more than one person per room - as a % of total occupied private dwellings

A 'room' is an enclosed area within a dwelling which is finished and suitable for year-round living (e.g., kitchen, dining-room, or bedroom). Not counted as rooms are bathrooms, halls, vestibules and rooms used solely for business purposes.

19. Average number of rooms per dwelling

A 'room' is an enclosed area within a dwelling which is finished and suitable for year-round living (e.g., kitchen, dining-room, or bedroom). Not counted as rooms are bathrooms, halls, vestibules and rooms used solely for business purposes.

20. Average value of owned dwelling ($)

'Owned occupied private dwellings' refers to a private dwelling which is owned or being purchased by some member of the household. A dwelling is classified as 'owned' even if it is not fully paid for, such as one which has a mortgage or some other claim on it.

'Value of dwelling' refers to the dollar amount expected by the owner if the dwelling were to be sold.

21. Family characteristics - 20% sample data

Census family refers to a married couple (with or without children of either or both spouses), a couple living common-law (with or without children of either or both partners) or a lone parent of any marital status, with at least one child living in the same dwelling. A couple may be of opposite or same sex. 'Children' in a census family include grandchildren living with their grandparent(s) but with no parents present.

22. Number of married-couple families

In 2006, this category includes both opposite-sex and same-sex married couples.

22. Median income in 2005 - Married-couple families ($)

In 2006, this category includes both opposite-sex and same-sex married couples.

22. Average number of persons in married-couple families

In 2006, this category includes both opposite-sex and same-sex married couples.

22. Median after-tax income in 2005 - Married-couple families ($)

In 2006, this category includes both opposite-sex and same-sex married couples.

23. Number of common-law-couple families

Since 2001, this category includes both opposite-sex and same-sex common-law couples.

23. Median income in 2005 - Common-law-couple families ($)

Since 2001, this category includes both opposite-sex and same-sex common-law couples.

23. Average number of persons in common-law-couple families

Since 2001, this category includes both opposite-sex and same-sex common-law couples.

24. Median income in 2005 - All census families ($)

Census family total income - The total income of a census family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.

Total income refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

  • wages and salaries (total)
  • net farm income
  • net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
  • child benefits
  • Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
  • benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
  • benefits from Employment Insurance
  • other income from government sources
  • dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
  • retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
  • other money income.

After-tax income of census families - The after-tax income of a census family is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that family. After-tax income of family members and persons not in families refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind', such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Median income of census families - The median income of a specified group of census families is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

The above concept and procedure also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of census families.

Census family refers to a married couple (with or without children of either or both spouses), a couple living common-law (with or without children of either or both partners) or a lone parent of any marital status, with at least one child living in the same dwelling. A couple may be of opposite or same sex. 'Children' in a census family include grandchildren living with their grandparent(s) but with no parents present.

24. Median after-tax income in 2005 - All census families ($)

Census family total income - The total income of a census family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.

Total income refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

  • wages and salaries (total)
  • net farm income
  • net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
  • child benefits
  • Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
  • benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
  • benefits from Employment Insurance
  • other income from government sources
  • dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
  • retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
  • other money income.

After-tax income of census families - The after-tax income of a census family is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that family. After-tax income of family members and persons not in families refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind', such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Median income of census families - The median income of a specified group of census families is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

The above concept and procedure also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of census families.

Census family refers to a married couple (with or without children of either or both spouses), a couple living common-law (with or without children of either or both partners) or a lone parent of any marital status, with at least one child living in the same dwelling. A couple may be of opposite or same sex. 'Children' in a census family include grandchildren living with their grandparent(s) but with no parents present.

25. Household characteristics - 20% sample data

Private household refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy the same dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. It may consist of a family group (census family) with or without other persons, of two or more families sharing a dwelling, of a group of unrelated persons, or of one person living alone. Household members who are temporarily absent on Census Day (e.g., temporary residents elsewhere) are considered as part of their usual household. For census purposes, every person is a member of one and only one household. Unless otherwise specified, all data in household reports are for private households only.

26. Median after-tax income in 2005 - Couple households with children ($)

Refers to one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with at least one child under 25 years of age.

26. Median income in 2005 - Couple households with children ($)

Refers to one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with at least one child under 25 years of age.

26. Households containing a couple (married or common-law) with children

Refers to one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with at least one child under 25 years of age.

27. Median after-tax income in 2005 - Couple households without children ($)

Includes one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with all children 25 years of age and over.

27. Median income in 2005 - Couple households without children ($)

Includes one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with all children 25 years of age and over.

27. Households containing a couple (married or common-law) without children

Includes one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with all children 25 years of age and over.

28. Other household types

Includes multiple-family households, lone-parent family households and non-family households other than one-person households.

28. Median income in 2005 - Other household types ($)

Includes multiple-family households, lone-parent family households and non-family households other than one-person households.

28. Median after-tax income in 2005 - Other household types ($)

Includes multiple-family households, lone-parent family households and non-family households other than one-person households.

29. Median income in 2005 - All private households ($)

Household total income - The total income of a household is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that household.

Total income refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

  • wages and salaries (total)
  • net farm income
  • net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
  • child benefits
  • Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
  • benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
  • benefits from Employment Insurance
  • other income from government sources
  • dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
  • retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
  • other money income.

After-tax income of households - The after-tax income of a household is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that household. After-tax income refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind', such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Median income of households - The median income of a specified group of households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

The above concept and procedure also apply in the calculation of median after-tax income of households.

Private household refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy the same dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. It may consist of a family group (census family) with or without other persons, of two or more families sharing a dwelling, of a group of unrelated persons, or of one person living alone. Household members who are temporarily absent on Census Day (e.g., temporary residents elsewhere) are considered as part of their usual household. For census purposes, every person is a member of one and only one household. Unless otherwise specified, all data in household reports are for private households only.

29. Median after-tax income in 2005 - All private households ($)

Household total income - The total income of a household is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that household.

Total income refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

  • wages and salaries (total)
  • net farm income
  • net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
  • child benefits
  • Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
  • benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
  • benefits from Employment Insurance
  • other income from government sources
  • dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
  • retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
  • other money income.

After-tax income of households - The after-tax income of a household is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that household. After-tax income refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind', such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Median income of households - The median income of a specified group of households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

The above concept and procedure also apply in the calculation of median after-tax income of households.

Private household refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy the same dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. It may consist of a family group (census family) with or without other persons, of two or more families sharing a dwelling, of a group of unrelated persons, or of one person living alone. Household members who are temporarily absent on Census Day (e.g., temporary residents elsewhere) are considered as part of their usual household. For census purposes, every person is a member of one and only one household. Unless otherwise specified, all data in household reports are for private households only.

30. Median monthly payments for rented dwellings ($)

Includes the monthly rent and costs of electricity, heat and municipal services paid by tenant households.

31. Median monthly payments for owner-occupied dwellings ($)

Includes all shelter expenses paid by households that own their dwellings.

32. Mother tongue - 20% sample data

Refers to the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood by the individual at the time of the census.

33. Other language(s)

Includes responses indicating single responses of a non-official language and multiple responses. Multiple responses include cases where one non-official language is in combination either with English or French or with both official languages.

34. Knowledge of official languages - 20% sample data

Refers to the ability to conduct a conversation in English only, in French only, in both English and French, or in neither of the official languages of Canada.

Data on knowledge of official languages

According to studies on data certification, the 2006 Census statistics on knowledge of official languages could underestimate the category 'English and French' and overestimate the category 'French only,' particularly for the francophone population, but also for the whole population in general. More information on the subject will be available in the Languages Reference Guide, to be published in 2008.

35. Language spoken most often at home - 20% sample data

Refers to the language spoken most often at home by the individual at the time of the census. Other languages spoken at home on a regular basis were also collected.

36. Immigrant status and period of immigration - 20% sample data

Note: Suppression of citizenship and immigration data on Indian reserves and settlements

Persons living on Indian reserves and Indian settlements who were enumerated with the 2006 Census Form 2D questionnaire were not asked the questions on citizenship (Question 10), landed immigrant status (Question 11) and year of immigration (Question 12). Consequently, citizenship, landed immigrant status and period of immigration data are suppressed using zeros for Indian reserves and Indian settlements at census subdivision and lower levels of geography where the majority of the population was enumerated with the 2D Form. These data are, however, included in the totals for larger geographic areas, such as census divisions and provinces.

For more information on the census data quality and confidentiality standards and guidelines relating to Indian reserves, please refer to http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2006/ref/notes/dq-qd/reserves-eng.cfm.

For a complete list of Indian reserves and Indian settlements for which citizenship, landed immigrant status and period of immigration data are suppressed using zeros, please refer to http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2006/ref/notes/sup_2D-eng.cfm.

37. Non-immigrants

Non-immigrants are persons who are Canadian citizens by birth. Although most Canadian citizens by birth were born in Canada, a small number were born outside Canada to Canadian parents.

38. Immigrants

Immigrants are persons who are, or have ever been, landed immigrants in Canada. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others are more recent arrivals. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number were born in Canada. Includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to Census Day, May 16, 2006.

39. 2001 to 2006

Includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to Census Day, May 16, 2006.

40. Non-permanent residents

Non-permanent residents are persons from another country who, at the time of the census, held a Work or Study Permit, or who were refugee claimants, as well as family members living with them in Canada.

41. Citizenship - 20% sample data

Refers to the legal citizenship status of the respondent. Persons who are citizens of more than one country were instructed to provide the name of the other country(ies).

Note: Suppression of citizenship and immigration data on Indian reserves and settlements

Persons living on Indian reserves and Indian settlements who were enumerated with the 2006 Census Form 2D questionnaire were not asked the questions on citizenship (Question 10), landed immigrant status (Question 11) and year of immigration (Question 12). Consequently, citizenship, landed immigrant status and period of immigration data are suppressed using zeros for Indian reserves and Indian settlements at census subdivision and lower levels of geography where the majority of the population was enumerated with the 2D Form. These data are, however, included in the totals for larger geographic areas, such as census divisions and provinces.

For more information on the census data quality and confidentiality standards and guidelines relating to Indian reserves, please refer to http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2006/ref/notes/dq-qd/reserves-eng.cfm.

For a complete list of Indian reserves and Indian settlements for which citizenship, landed immigrant status and period of immigration data are suppressed using zeros, please refer to http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2006/ref/notes/sup_2D-eng.cfm.

42. Not Canadian citizens

Includes persons who are stateless. Prior to the 2006 Census, this category was called 'Citizens of other country(ies).' The content of the category remains unchanged in 2006 compared with previous censuses.

43. Generation status - 20% sample data

Refers to the generational status of a person, that is, 1st generation, 2nd generation or 3rd generation or more.

44. 1st generation

Persons born outside Canada. For the most part, these are people who are now, or have ever been, landed immigrants in Canada. Also included in the first generation are a small number of people born outside Canada to parents who are Canadian citizens by birth. In addition, the first generation includes people who are non-permanent residents (defined as people from another country living in Canada on Work or Study Permits or as refugee claimants, and any family members living with them in Canada).

45. 2nd generation

Persons born inside Canada with at least one parent born outside Canada. This includes (a) persons born in Canada with both parents born outside Canada and (b) persons born in Canada with one parent born in Canada and one parent born outside Canada (these persons may have grandparents born inside or outside Canada as well).

46. 3rd generation or more

Persons born inside Canada with both parents born inside Canada (these persons may have grandparents born inside or outside Canada as well).

47. Mobility status - Place of residence 1 year ago - 20% sample data

Information indicating whether the person lived in the same residence on Census Day (May 16, 2006), as he or she did one year before (May 16, 2005).

Estimates of internal migration may be less accurate for small geographic areas, areas with a place name that is duplicated elsewhere, and for some census subdivisions (CSDs) where residents may have provided the name of the census metropolitan area or census agglomeration instead of the specific name of the component CSD from which they migrated.

To improve the accuracy of the 2006 Census data, postal codes are used to pinpoint the exact CSD of the previous residence.

For additional information, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue number 92-566-XWE or 92-566-XPE.

48. Mobility status - Place of residence 5 years ago - 20% sample data

Information indicating whether the person lived in the same residence on Census Day (May 16, 2006), as he or she did five years before (May 16, 2001).

Estimates of internal migration may be less accurate for small geographic areas, areas with a place name that is duplicated elsewhere, and for some census subdivisions (CSDs) where residents may have provided the name of the census metropolitan area or census agglomeration instead of the specific name of the component CSD from which they migrated.

To improve the accuracy of the 2006 Census data, postal codes are used to pinpoint the exact CSD of the previous residence.

For additional information, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue number 92-566-XWE or 92-566-XPE.

49. Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal identity population - 20% sample data

This is a grouping of the total population into non-Aboriginal or Aboriginal population, based on their responses to three questions on the 2006 Census form.

50. Aboriginal identity population

Included in the Aboriginal identity population are those persons who reported identifying with at least one Aboriginal group, that is, North American Indian, Métis or Inuit, and/or those who reported being a Treaty Indian or a Registered Indian, as defined by the Indian Act of Canada, and/or those who reported they were members of an Indian band or First Nation.

51. Educational attainment - 20% sample data

'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' refers to the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed based on a hierarchy which is generally related to the amount of time spent 'in-class.' For postsecondary completers, a university education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than a college education, while a college education is considered to be a higher level of education than in the trades. Although some trades requirements may take as long or longer to complete than a given college or university program, the majority of time is spent in on-the-job paid training and less time is spent in the classroom.

52. High school certificate or equivalent

'High school certificate or equivalent' includes persons who have graduated from a secondary school or equivalent. Excludes persons with a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. Examples of postsecondary institutions include community colleges, institutes of technology, CEGEPs, private trade schools, private business colleges, schools of nursing and universities.

53. College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma

'College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma' replaces the category 'Other non-university certificate or diploma' in previous censuses. This category includes accreditation by non-degree-granting institutions such as community colleges, CEGEPs, private business colleges and technical institutes.

54. Educational attainment - 20% sample data

'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' refers to the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed based on a hierarchy which is generally related to the amount of time spent 'in-class.' For postsecondary completers, a university education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than a college education, while a college education is considered to be a higher level of education than in the trades. Although some trades requirements may take as long or longer to complete than a given college or university program, the majority of time is spent in on-the-job paid training and less time is spent in the classroom.

55. High school certificate or equivalent

'High school certificate or equivalent' includes persons who have graduated from a secondary school or equivalent. Excludes persons with a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. Examples of postsecondary institutions include community colleges, institutes of technology, CEGEPs, private trade schools, private business colleges, schools of nursing and universities.

56. College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma

'College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma' replaces the category 'Other non-university certificate or diploma' in previous censuses. This category includes accreditation by non-degree-granting institutions such as community colleges, CEGEPs, private business colleges and technical institutes.

57. Educational attainment - 20% sample data

'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' refers to the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed based on a hierarchy which is generally related to the amount of time spent 'in-class.' For postsecondary completers, a university education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than a college education, while a college education is considered to be a higher level of education than in the trades. Although some trades requirements may take as long or longer to complete than a given college or university program, the majority of time is spent in on-the-job paid training and less time is spent in the classroom.

58. High school certificate or equivalent

'High school certificate or equivalent' includes persons who have graduated from a secondary school or equivalent. Excludes persons with a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. Examples of postsecondary institutions include community colleges, institutes of technology, CEGEPs, private trade schools, private business colleges, schools of nursing and universities.

59. College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma

'College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma' replaces the category 'Other non-university certificate or diploma' in previous censuses. This category includes accreditation by non-degree-granting institutions such as community colleges, CEGEPs, private business colleges and technical institutes.

60. Educational attainment - 20% sample data

'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' refers to the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed based on a hierarchy which is generally related to the amount of time spent 'in-class.' For postsecondary completers, a university education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than a college education, while a college education is considered to be a higher level of education than in the trades. Although some trades requirements may take as long or longer to complete than a given college or university program, the majority of time is spent in on-the-job paid training and less time is spent in the classroom.

61. High school certificate or equivalent

'High school certificate or equivalent' includes persons who have graduated from a secondary school or equivalent. Excludes persons with a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. Examples of postsecondary institutions include community colleges, institutes of technology, CEGEPs, private trade schools, private business colleges, schools of nursing and universities.

62. College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma

'College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma' replaces the category 'Other non-university certificate or diploma' in previous censuses. This category includes accreditation by non-degree-granting institutions such as community colleges, CEGEPs, private business colleges and technical institutes.

63. Major field of study - 20% sample data

'Field of study' is defined as the main discipline or subject of learning. It is collected for the highest certificate, diploma or degree above the high school or secondary school level.

64. Other

Includes multidisciplinary/interdisciplinary studies (other).

65. Location of study - 20% sample data

'Location of study' refers to the province, territory or country where the highest certificate, diploma or degree above the high school level was completed.

66. Labour force activity - 20% sample data

Labour force activity - Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

67. In the labour force

Labour force - Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). In past censuses, this was called 'total labour force.'

68. Employed

Employed - Refers to persons 15 years and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006):

(a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice;

(b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

69. Unemployed

Unemployed - Refers to persons 15 years and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either:

(a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks;

(b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job;

(c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

70. Not in the labour force

Not in the labour force - Refers to persons 15 years and over, excluding institutional residents, who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long-term illness or disability.

71. Participation rate

Participation rate - Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years and over excluding institutional residents.

72. Employment rate

Employment rate - Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years and over excluding institutional residents.

73. Unemployment rate

Unemployment rate - Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

74. Occupation - 20% sample data

Occupation - National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006. Refers to the kind of work persons were doing during the reference week, as determined by their kind of work and the description of the main activities in their job. If the person did not have a job during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 16, 2006), the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 2005. Persons with two or more jobs were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

Experienced labour force

Refers to persons 15 years and over, excluding institutional residents who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were employed and the unemployed who had last worked for pay or in self-employment in either 2005 or 2006.

75. A - Management occupations

Broad occupational category A - Management occupations

Census data for occupation groups in Broad occupational category A - Management occupations should be used with caution. Some coding errors were made in assigning the appropriate level of management, e.g., senior manager as opposed to middle manager, and in determining the appropriate area of specialization or activity, e.g., a manager of a health care program in a hospital as opposed to a government manager in health policy administration. Some non-management occupations have also been miscoded to management due to confusion over titles such as program manager and project manager. Data users may wish to use data for management occupations in conjunction with other variables such as Income, Age and Education.

76. Industry - 20% sample data

Industry - North American Industry Classification System 2002. Refers to the general nature of the business carried out in the establishment where the person worked. If the person did not have a job during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 16, 2006), the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 2005. Persons with two or more jobs were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

Experienced labour force

Refers to persons 15 years and over, excluding institutional residents who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were employed and the unemployed who had last worked for pay or in self-employment in either 2005 or 2006.

77. Unpaid work - 20% sample data

Persons reporting hours of unpaid work.

Includes all persons reporting hours of unpaid housework; hours looking after children, without pay; or hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors.

78. Persons reporting hours of unpaid housework

Refers to the number of persons reporting hours of unpaid housework, yard work or home maintenance in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Unpaid housework includes work for one's own household, for other family members outside the household, and for friends or neighbours.

79. Persons reporting hours looking after children, without pay

Refers to the number of persons reporting hours spent looking after children without pay. It includes hours spent providing unpaid child care for members of one's own household, for other family members outside the household, for friends or neighbours in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

80. Persons reporting hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors

Refers to the number of persons reporting hours spent providing unpaid care or assistance to seniors of one's own household, to other senior family members outside the household, and to friends or neighbours in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

81. Language used most often at work - 20% sample data

Refers to the language used most often at work by the individual at the time of the census. Other languages used at work on a regular basis were also collected.

82. Place of work status - 20% sample data

Employed labour force 15 years and over who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006):

(a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice

(b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

83. Mode of transportation to work - 20% sample data

Refers to the mode of transportation to work of non-institutional residents 15 years of age and over who worked at some time since January 1, 2005. Persons who indicate in the place of work question that they either had no fixed workplace address, or specified a usual workplace address, are asked to identify the mode of transportation they usually use to commute from home to work. The variable usually relates to the individual's job in the week prior to enumeration. However, if the person did not work during that week but had worked at some time since January 1, 2005, the information relates to the job held longest during that period.

84. Visible minority population - 20% sample data

85. Total visible minority population

The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as 'persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.'

86. South Asian

For example, East Indian, Pakistani, Sri Lankan, etc.

87. Southeast Asian

For example, Vietnamese, Cambodian, Malaysian, Laotian, etc.

88. West Asian

For example, Iranian, Afghan, etc.

89. Visible minority, n.i.e.

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere.' Includes respondents who reported a write-in response such as 'Guyanese,' 'West Indian,' 'Kurd,' 'Tibetan,' 'Polynesian,' 'Pacific Islander,' etc.

90. Multiple visible minority

Includes respondents who reported more than one visible minority group by checking two or more mark-in circles, e.g., 'Black' and 'South Asian.'

91. Not a visible minority

Includes respondents who reported 'Yes' to the Aboriginal identity question (Question 18) as well as respondents who were not considered to be members of a visible minority group.

92. Persons 15 years and over with earnings (counts)

Earnings or employment income - Refers to total income received by persons 15 years and over during calendar year 2005 as wages and salaries, net income from a non-farm unincorporated business and/or professional practice, and/or net farm self-employment income.

Wages and salaries - Refers to gross wages and salaries before deductions for such items as income tax, pensions and Employment Insurance. Included in this source are military pay and allowances, tips, commissions and cash bonuses, benefits from wage-loss replacement plans or income-maintenance insurance plans, supplementary unemployment benefits from an employer or union as well as all types of casual earnings during calendar year 2005. Other employment income such as taxable benefits, research grants and royalties are included.

Net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice - Refers to net income (gross receipts minus expenses of operation such as wages, rents and depreciation) received during calendar year 2005 from the respondent's non-farm unincorporated business or professional practice. In the case of partnerships, only the respondent's share was reported. Also included is net income from persons babysitting in their own homes, persons providing room and board to non-relatives, self-employed fishers, hunters and trappers, operators of direct distributorships such as those selling and delivering cosmetics, as well as freelance activities of artists, writers, music teachers, hairdressers, dressmakers, etc.

Net farm income - Refers to net income (gross receipts from farm sales minus depreciation and cost of operation) received during calendar year 2005 from the operation of a farm, either on the respondent's own account or in partnership. In the case of partnerships, only the respondent's share of income was reported. Included with gross receipts are cash advances received in 2005, dividends from cooperatives, rebates and farm-support payments to farmers from federal, provincial and regional agricultural programs (for example, milk subsidies and marketing board payments) and gross insurance proceeds such as payments from the Net Income Stabilization Account (NISA). The value of income 'in kind', such as agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm, is excluded.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Average and median incomes and standard errors for average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (census/economic families, persons not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics for earnings or any other source of income and after-tax income of individuals 15 years and over.

Includes persons who did not work in 2005 but reported earnings.

93. Median earnings - Persons 15 years and over who worked full year, full time ($)

For persons with earnings.

93. Median earnings - Persons 15 years and over ($)

For persons with earnings.

94. Persons 15 years and over with earnings who worked full year, full time (counts)

Worked 49 to 52 weeks in 2005, mostly full time and reported earnings.

95. Persons 15 years and over with income (counts)

Total income - Refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years and over:

  • wages and salaries (total)
  • net farm income
  • net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
  • child benefits
  • Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
  • benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
  • benefits from Employment Insurance
  • other income from government sources
  • dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
  • retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
  • other money income.

After-tax income refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind', such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Average and median incomes and standard errors for average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (census/economic families, persons not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

96. Median income - Persons 15 years and over ($)

For persons with income.

96. Median income after tax - Persons 15 years and over ($)

For persons with income.

97. Composition of total income (100%)

Composition of income of a population group or a geographic area refers to the relative share of each income source or group of sources, expressed as a percentage of the aggregate total income of that group or area. Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding.

98. Income status of all persons in private households (counts)

Income status before or after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before-tax or after-tax cut-offs.

Since each family member shares the income status of that family, percentages in low income can be derived for all persons in private households. For additional information, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary.

Symbols:

A adjusted figure due to boundary change

Users wishing to compare 2006 Census data with those of other censuses should then take into account that the boundaries of geographic areas may change from one census to another. In order to facilitate comparison, the 2001 Census counts are adjusted, as needed, to take into account boundary changes between the 2001 and 2006 censuses. The 2001 counts that were adjusted are identified by the letter 'A'. The letter 'A' may also refer to corrections to the 2001 counts; however, most of these are the result of boundary changes. This symbol is also used to identify areas that have been created since 2001, such as newly incorporated municipalities (census subdivisions).

E use with caution

After the release of the 2001 or 2006 Census population and dwelling counts, errors are occasionally uncovered in the data. It is not possible to make changes to the 2001 or 2006 Census data presented in these tables.

Refer to the 2001 population and dwelling count amendments or the 2006 population and dwelling count amendments for further information.

X area and data suppression

In addition to random rounding, area and data suppression has been adopted to further protect the confidentiality of individual respondents' personal information.

Area and data suppression results in the deletion of all information for geographic areas with populations below a specified size. For example, areas with a population of less than 40 persons are suppressed. If the community searched has a population of less than 40 persons, only the total population counts will be available.

Whenever income data are shown, those areas with populations below 250 persons, or where the number of private households is less than 40, income data are suppressed. If a community searched has less than 250 persons, or if the number of private households is less than 40, the income data will not be available. All suppressed cells and associated averages, medians and standard errors of average income have been replaced with zeros. In all cases, suppressed data are included in the appropriate higher-level aggregate subtotals and totals.

Persons living on Indian reserves and Indian settlements who were enumerated with the 2006 Census Form 2D questionnaire were not asked the questions on citizenship and immigration. Consequently, data are suppressed for Indian reserves and Indian settlements at the census subdivision level. These data are, however, included in the totals for larger geographic areas such as provinces and territories.

To view the extent to which data are suppressed, see 'suppression criteria'.

 excludes census data for one or more incompletely enumerated Indian reserves or Indian settlements

Excludes census data for one or more incompletely enumerated Indian reserves or Indian settlements (For further information, see the 'Notes'.)

 incompletely enumerated Indian Reserve or Indian settlement (For further information, see the 'Notes'.)

Due to incompletely enumerated Indian reserves and Indian settlements, data are not available for either the 2006 Census, the 2001 Census or for both the 2001 and 2006 censuses.

Refer to a complete list of these geographic areas.

... not applicable

The possible reasons for the use of the three dots (···) symbol are:

  • A value that cannot be calculated such as a percentage change where the denominator is zero;
  • A figure is deemed inappropriate for areas that had a population and/or dwelling count amendment in 2001.

Refer to the 2001 population and dwelling count amendments for further information.


Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census of Population.

How to cite: Statistics Canada. 2007. Cayoosh Creek 1, British Columbia (Code5931814) (table). 2006 Community Profiles. 2006 Census. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 92-591-XWE. Ottawa. Released March 13, 2007.
http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/index.cfm?Lang=E
(accessed December 6, 2016).