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Federal Electoral District Profile of Vancouver Island North, British Columbia (2003 Representation Order), 2006 Census

Selected characteristics Vancouver Island North
Map
British Columbia1 Canada1
Notes:
  1. Incompletely enumerated indian reserve or indian settlement
    On some Indian reserves and Indian settlements in the 2006 Census, enumeration was not permitted or was interrupted before it could be completed. Moreover, for some Indian reserves and Indian settlements, the quality of the enumeration was considered inadequate. These geographic areas (a total of 22) are called incompletely enumerated Indian reserves and Indian settlements.
  2. Total population (100% data)
    Age - 100% data. Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from date of birth.

    Sex - 100% data. Refers to the gender of the respondent.
  3. Median age of the population
    The median age is an age 'x', such that exactly one half of the population is older than 'x' and the other half is younger than 'x'.
  4. Total population 15 years and over by common-law status (100% data)
    Refers to persons who live together as a couple but who are not legally married to each other. These persons can be of the opposite sex or of the same sex.
  5. Total population 15 years and over by legal marital status (100% data)
    Refers to the legal conjugal status of a person.
  6. Never legally married (single)
    Persons who have never married (including all persons less than 15 years of age) and persons whose marriage has been annulled and who have not remarried.
  7. Legally married (and not separated)
    Persons whose spouse is living, unless the couple is separated or a divorce has been obtained. In 2006, legally married same-sex couples are included in this category.
  8. Separated, but still legally married
    Persons currently married, but who are no longer living with their spouse (for any reason other than illness or work) and have not obtained a divorce.
  9. Divorced
    Persons who have obtained a legal divorce and who have not remarried.
  10. Widowed
    Persons who have lost their spouse through death and who have not remarried.
  11. Total private dwellings occupied by usual residents (20% sample data)
    'Occupied private dwellings' refers to a private dwelling in which a person or a group of persons are permanently residing. Also included are private dwellings whose usual residents are temporarily absent on Census Day.
  12. Apartments, duplex - as a % of total occupied private dwellings
    In 2006, improvements to the enumeration process and changes in structural type classification affect the historical comparability of the 'structural type of dwelling' variable. In 2006, 'apartment or flat in a duplex' replaces 'apartment or flat in a detached duplex' and includes duplexes attached to other dwellings or buildings. This is a change from the 2001 Census where duplexes attached to other dwellings or buildings were classified as an 'apartment in a building that has fewer than five storeys'.
  13. Apartments in buildings with fewer than five storeys - as a % of total occupied private dwellings
    In 2006, improvements to the enumeration process and changes in structural type classification affect the historical comparability of the 'structural type of dwelling' variable. In 2006, 'apartment or flat in a duplex' replaces 'apartment or flat in a detached duplex' and includes duplexes attached to other dwellings or buildings. This is a change from the 2001 Census where duplexes attached to other dwellings or buildings were classified as an 'apartment in a building that has fewer than five storeys'.
  14. Other dwellings - as a % of total occupied private dwellings
    'Other occupied private dwellings' includes other single attached houses and movable dwellings such as mobile homes and other movable dwellings such as houseboats and railroad cars.
  15. Number of owned dwellings
    'Owned occupied private dwellings' refers to a private dwelling which is owned or being purchased by some member of the household. A dwelling is classified as 'owned' even if it is not fully paid for, such as one which has a mortgage or some other claim on it.
  16. Number of rented dwellings
    'Rented occupied private dwellings' refers to a private dwelling, even if it is provided without cash rent or at a reduced rent, or if the dwelling is part of a cooperative.
  17. Number of dwellings constructed between 1986 and 2006
    Includes data up to May 16, 2006.
  18. Average number of rooms per dwelling
    A 'room' is an enclosed area within a dwelling which is finished and suitable for year-round living (e.g., kitchen, dining-room, or bedroom). Not counted as rooms are bathrooms, halls, vestibules and rooms used solely for business purposes.
  19. Dwellings with more than one person per room - as a % of total occupied private dwellings
    A 'room' is an enclosed area within a dwelling which is finished and suitable for year-round living (e.g., kitchen, dining-room, or bedroom). Not counted as rooms are bathrooms, halls, vestibules and rooms used solely for business purposes.
  20. Average value of owned dwelling ($)
    'Owned occupied private dwellings' refers to a private dwelling which is owned or being purchased by some member of the household. A dwelling is classified as 'owned' even if it is not fully paid for, such as one which has a mortgage or some other claim on it.

    'Value of dwelling' refers to the dollar amount expected by the owner if the dwelling were to be sold.
  21. Total number of census families (20% sample data)
    Census family refers to a married couple (with or without children of either or both spouses), a couple living common-law (with or without children of either or both partners) or a lone parent of any marital status, with at least one child living in the same dwelling. A couple may be of opposite or same sex. 'Children' in a census family include grandchildren living with their grandparent(s) but with no parents present.
  22. Number of married-couple families
    In 2006, this category includes both opposite-sex and same-sex married couples.
  23. Number of common-law-couple families
    Since 2001, this category includes both opposite-sex and same-sex common-law couples.
  24. Average number of persons in married-couple families
    In 2006, this category includes both opposite-sex and same-sex married couples.
  25. Average number of persons in common-law-couple families
    Since 2001, this category includes both opposite-sex and same-sex common-law couples.
  26. Median income in 2005 - All census families ($)
    Census family total income - The total income of a census family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.

    Total income refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:
    • wages and salaries (total)
    • net farm income
    • net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
    • child benefits
    • Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
    • benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
    • benefits from Employment Insurance
    • other income from government sources
    • dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
    • retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
    • other money income.

    After-tax income of census families - The after-tax income of a census family is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that family. After-tax income of family members and persons not in families refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial taxes paid for 2005.

    Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind', such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

    Median income of census families - The median income of a specified group of census families is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

    The above concept and procedure also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of census families.

    Census family refers to a married couple (with or without children of either or both spouses), a couple living common-law (with or without children of either or both partners) or a lone parent of any marital status, with at least one child living in the same dwelling. A couple may be of opposite or same sex. 'Children' in a census family include grandchildren living with their grandparent(s) but with no parents present.
  27. Median income in 2005 - Married-couple families ($)
    In 2006, this category includes both opposite-sex and same-sex married couples.
  28. Median income in 2005 - Common-law-couple families ($)
    Since 2001, this category includes both opposite-sex and same-sex common-law couples.
  29. Median after-tax income in 2005 - All census families ($)
    Census family total income - The total income of a census family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.

    Total income refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:
    • wages and salaries (total)
    • net farm income
    • net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
    • child benefits
    • Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
    • benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
    • benefits from Employment Insurance
    • other income from government sources
    • dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
    • retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
    • other money income.


    After-tax income of census families - The after-tax income of a census family is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that family. After-tax income of family members and persons not in families refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial taxes paid for 2005.

    Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind', such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

    Median income of census families - The median income of a specified group of census families is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

    The above concept and procedure also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of census families.

    Census family refers to a married couple (with or without children of either or both spouses), a couple living common-law (with or without children of either or both partners) or a lone parent of any marital status, with at least one child living in the same dwelling. A couple may be of opposite or same sex. 'Children' in a census family include grandchildren living with their grandparent(s) but with no parents present.
  30. Median after-tax income in 2005 - Married-couple families ($)
    In 2006, this category includes both opposite-sex and same-sex married couples.
  31. Total private households (20% sample data)
    Private household refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy the same dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. It may consist of a family group (census family) with or without other persons, of two or more families sharing a dwelling, of a group of unrelated persons, or of one person living alone. Household members who are temporarily absent on Census Day (e.g., temporary residents elsewhere) are considered as part of their usual household. For census purposes, every person is a member of one and only one household. Unless otherwise specified, all data in household reports are for private households only.
  32. Households containing a couple (married or common-law) with children
    Refers to one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with at least one child under 25 years of age.
  33. Households containing a couple (married or common-law) without children
    Includes one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with all children 25 years of age and over.
  34. Other household types
    Includes multiple-family households, lone-parent family households and non-family households other than one-person households.
  35. Median income in 2005 - All private households ($)
    Household total income - The total income of a household is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that household.

    Total income refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:
    • wages and salaries (total)
    • net farm income
    • net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
    • child benefits
    • Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
    • benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
    • benefits from Employment Insurance
    • other income from government sources
    • dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
    • retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
    • other money income.


    After-tax income of households - The after-tax income of a household is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that household. After-tax income refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial taxes paid for 2005.

    Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind', such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

    Median income of households - The median income of a specified group of households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

    The above concept and procedure also apply in the calculation of median after-tax income of households.

    Private household refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy the same dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. It may consist of a family group (census family) with or without other persons, of two or more families sharing a dwelling, of a group of unrelated persons, or of one person living alone. Household members who are temporarily absent on Census Day (e.g., temporary residents elsewhere) are considered as part of their usual household. For census purposes, every person is a member of one and only one household. Unless otherwise specified, all data in household reports are for private households only.
  36. Median income in 2005 - Couple households with children ($)
    Refers to one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with at least one child under 25 years of age.
  37. Median income in 2005 - Couple households without children ($)
    Includes one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with all children 25 years of age and over.
  38. Median income in 2005 - Other household types ($)
    Includes multiple-family households, lone-parent family households and non-family households other than one-person households.
  39. Median after-tax income in 2005 - All private households ($)
    Household total income - The total income of a household is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that household.

    Total income refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:
    • wages and salaries (total)
    • net farm income
    • net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
    • child benefits
    • Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
    • benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
    • benefits from Employment Insurance
    • other income from government sources
    • dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
    • retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
    • other money income.


    After-tax income of households - The after-tax income of a household is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that household. After-tax income refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial taxes paid for 2005.

    Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind', such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

    Median income of households - The median income of a specified group of households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

    The above concept and procedure also apply in the calculation of median after-tax income of households.

    Private household refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy the same dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. It may consist of a family group (census family) with or without other persons, of two or more families sharing a dwelling, of a group of unrelated persons, or of one person living alone. Household members who are temporarily absent on Census Day (e.g., temporary residents elsewhere) are considered as part of their usual household. For census purposes, every person is a member of one and only one household. Unless otherwise specified, all data in household reports are for private households only.
  40. Median after-tax income in 2005 - Couple households with children ($)
    Refers to one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with at least one child under 25 years of age.
  41. Median after-tax income in 2005 - Couple households without children ($)
    Includes one-family households containing a couple (with or without persons not in census families) with all children 25 years of age and over.
  42. Median after-tax income in 2005 - Other household types ($)
    Includes multiple-family households, lone-parent family households and non-family households other than one-person households.
  43. Median monthly payments for rented dwellings ($)
    Includes the monthly rent and costs of electricity, heat and municipal services paid by tenant households.
  44. Median monthly payments for owner-occupied dwellings ($)
    Includes all shelter expenses paid by households that own their dwellings.
  45. Total population by mother tongue (20% sample data)
    Refers to the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood by the individual at the time of the census.
  46. Other language(s)
    Includes responses indicating single responses of a non-official language and multiple responses. Multiple responses include cases where one non-official language is in combination either with English or French or with both official languages.
  47. Total population by knowledge of official languages (20% sample data)
    Refers to the ability to conduct a conversation in English only, in French only, in both English and French, or in neither of the official languages of Canada.

    Data on knowledge of official languages

    According to studies on data certification, the 2006 Census statistics on knowledge of official languages could underestimate the category 'English and French' and overestimate the category 'French only,' particularly for the francophone population, but also for the whole population in general. More information on the subject will be available in the Languages Reference Guide, to be published in 2008.
  48. Total population by home language (20% sample data)
    Refers to the language spoken most often at home by the individual at the time of the census. Other languages spoken at home on a regular basis were also collected.
  49. Total population by immigrant status (20% sample data)
    Note: Suppression of citizenship and immigration data on Indian reserves and settlements

    Persons living on Indian reserves and Indian settlements who were enumerated with the 2006 Census Form 2D questionnaire were not asked the questions on citizenship (Question 10), landed immigrant status (Question 11) and year of immigration (Question 12). Consequently, citizenship, landed immigrant status and period of immigration data are suppressed using zeros for Indian reserves and Indian settlements at census subdivision and lower levels of geography where the majority of the population was enumerated with the 2D Form. These data are, however, included in the totals for larger geographic areas, such as census divisions and provinces.

    For more information on the census data quality and confidentiality standards and guidelines relating to Indian reserves, please refer to Data quality and confidentiality standards and guidelines (public): Data suppression - Indian reserves.

    For a complete list of Indian reserves and Indian settlements for which citizenship, landed immigrant status and period of immigration data are suppressed using zeros, please refer to Indian reserves and Indian settlements for which citizenship, landed immigrant status and period of immigration data are suppressed - 2006 and 2001 censuses.
  50. Non-immigrants
    Non-immigrants are persons who are Canadian citizens by birth. Although most Canadian citizens by birth were born in Canada, a small number were born outside Canada to Canadian parents.
  51. Immigrants
    Immigrants are persons who are, or have ever been, landed immigrants in Canada. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others are more recent arrivals. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number were born in Canada. Includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to Census Day, May 16, 2006.
  52. 2001 to 2006
    Includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to Census Day, May 16, 2006.
  53. Non-permanent residents
    Non-permanent residents are persons from another country who, at the time of the census, held a Work or Study Permit, or who were refugee claimants, as well as family members living with them in Canada.
  54. Total population by citizenship (20% sample data)
    Refers to the legal citizenship status of the respondent. Persons who are citizens of more than one country were instructed to provide the name of the other country(ies).

    Note: Suppression of citizenship and immigration data on Indian reserves and settlements

    Persons living on Indian reserves and Indian settlements who were enumerated with the 2006 Census Form 2D questionnaire were not asked the questions on citizenship (Question 10), landed immigrant status (Question 11) and year of immigration (Question 12). Consequently, citizenship, landed immigrant status and period of immigration data are suppressed using zeros for Indian reserves and Indian settlements at census subdivision and lower levels of geography where the majority of the population was enumerated with the 2D Form. These data are, however, included in the totals for larger geographic areas, such as census divisions and provinces.

    For more information on the census data quality and confidentiality standards and guidelines relating to Indian reserves, please refer to Data quality and confidentiality standards and guidelines (public): Data suppression - Indian reserves.

    For a complete list of Indian reserves and Indian settlements for which citizenship, landed immigrant status and period of immigration data are suppressed using zeros, please refer to Indian reserves and Indian settlements for which citizenship, landed immigrant status and period of immigration data are suppressed - 2006 and 2001 censuses.
  55. Not Canadian citizens
    Includes persons who are stateless. Prior to the 2006 Census, this category was called 'Citizens of other country(ies).' The content of the category remains unchanged in 2006 compared with previous censuses.
  56. Total population 15 years and over by generation status (20% sample data)
    Refers to the generational status of a person, that is, 1st generation, 2nd generation or 3rd generation or more.
  57. 1st generation
    Persons born outside Canada. For the most part, these are people who are now, or have ever been, landed immigrants in Canada. Also included in the first generation are a small number of people born outside Canada to parents who are Canadian citizens by birth. In addition, the first generation includes people who are non-permanent residents (defined as people from another country living in Canada on Work or Study Permits or as refugee claimants, and any family members living with them in Canada).
  58. 2nd generation
    Persons born inside Canada with at least one parent born outside Canada. This includes (a) persons born in Canada with both parents born outside Canada and (b) persons born in Canada with one parent born in Canada and one parent born outside Canada (these persons may have grandparents born inside or outside Canada as well).
  59. 3rd generation or more
    Persons born inside Canada with both parents born inside Canada (these persons may have grandparents born inside or outside Canada as well).
  60. Total population 1 year and over by mobility status 1 year ago (20% sample data)
    Information indicating whether the person lived in the same residence on Census Day (May 16, 2006), as he or she did one year before (May 16, 2005).

    Estimates of internal migration may be less accurate for small geographic areas, areas with a place name that is duplicated elsewhere, and for some census subdivisions (CSDs) where residents may have provided the name of the census metropolitan area or census agglomeration instead of the specific name of the component CSD from which they migrated.

    To improve the accuracy of the 2006 Census data, postal codes are used to pinpoint the exact CSD of the previous residence.

    For additional information, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue number 92-566 XWE.
  61. Total population 5 years and over by mobility status 5 years ago (20% sample data)
    Information indicating whether the person lived in the same residence on Census Day (May 16, 2006), as he or she did five years before (May 16, 2001).

    Estimates of internal migration may be less accurate for small geographic areas, areas with a place name that is duplicated elsewhere, and for some census subdivisions (CSDs) where residents may have provided the name of the census metropolitan area or census agglomeration instead of the specific name of the component CSD from which they migrated.

    To improve the accuracy of the 2006 Census data, postal codes are used to pinpoint the exact CSD of the previous residence.

    For additional information, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue number 92-566 XWE.
  62. Total Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal identity population (20% sample data)
    This is a grouping of the total population into non-Aboriginal or Aboriginal population, with Aboriginal persons further divided into Aboriginal groups, based on their responses to three questions on the 2006 Census form.
  63. Total Aboriginal identity population
    Included in the Aboriginal identity population are those persons who reported identifying with at least one Aboriginal group, that is, North American Indian, Métis or Inuit, and/or those who reported being a Treaty Indian or a Registered Indian, as defined by the Indian Act of Canada, and/or those who reported they were members of an Indian band or First Nation.
  64. North American Indian single response
    Users should be aware that the counts for this item are more affected than most by the incomplete enumeration of certain Indian reserves and Indian settlements. The extent of the impact will depend on the geographic area under study. In 2006, a total of 22 Indian reserves and Indian settlements were incompletely enumerated by the census. The populations of these 22 communities are not included in the census counts.
  65. Aboriginal responses not included elsewhere
    Includes those who identified themselves as Registered Indians and/or band members without identifying themselves as North American Indian, Métis or Inuit in the Aboriginal identity question.
  66. Total population 15 years and over by educational attainment (20% sample data)
    'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' refers to the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed based on a hierarchy which is generally related to the amount of time spent 'in-class.' For postsecondary completers, a university education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than a college education, while a college education is considered to be a higher level of education than in the trades. Although some trades requirements may take as long or longer to complete than a given college or university program, the majority of time is spent in on-the-job paid training and less time is spent in the classroom.
    Census questions relating to education changed substantially between 2001 and 2006, principally to reflect developments in Canada's education system.
    These changes improved the quality of data and provided more precise information on the level of educational attainment as well as fields of study.
    However, users should be aware that changes to the education portion of the 2006 Census questionnaire have affected the comparability of some 2006 Census data with data from previous censuses. More information on the historical comparability of specific categories of "Highest certificate, diploma or degree" is available in the Education Reference Guide, 2006 Census, catalogue number 97-560-GWE2006003.
  67. High school certificate or equivalent
    'High school certificate or equivalent' includes persons who have graduated from a secondary school or equivalent. Excludes persons with a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. Examples of postsecondary institutions include community colleges, institutes of technology, CEGEPs, private trade schools, private business colleges, schools of nursing and universities.
  68. College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma
    'College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma' replaces the category 'Other non-university certificate or diploma' in previous censuses. This category includes accreditation by non-degree-granting institutions such as community colleges, CEGEPs, private business colleges and technical institutes.
  69. University certificate or diploma below bachelor level
    Note: Data quality - Certificate or diploma below the bachelor level

    The overall quality of the 'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' variable from the 2006 Census is acceptable. However, users of the 'University certificate or diploma below the bachelor level' category should know that an unexpected growth in this category was noted compared to the 2001 Census.
    In fact, in the 2001 Census, 2.5% of respondents aged 15 years or over declared such a diploma, compared to 4.4% in 2006, representing 89% growth. This phenomenon was not found in other sources like the Labour Force Survey.
    We recommend users interpret the 2006 Census results for this category with caution.
    For more information on factors that may explain such variances in census data, such as response errors and processing errors, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Appendix B: Data quality, sampling and weighting, confidentiality and random rounding.
    More information is available in the Education Reference Guide, 2006 Census, catalogue number 97-560-GWE2006003.
  70. Total population aged 15 to 24
    'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' refers to the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed based on a hierarchy which is generally related to the amount of time spent 'in-class.' For postsecondary completers, a university education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than a college education, while a college education is considered to be a higher level of education than in the trades. Although some trades requirements may take as long or longer to complete than a given college or university program, the majority of time is spent in on-the-job paid training and less time is spent in the classroom.
  71. High school certificate or equivalent
    'High school certificate or equivalent' includes persons who have graduated from a secondary school or equivalent. Excludes persons with a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. Examples of postsecondary institutions include community colleges, institutes of technology, CEGEPs, private trade schools, private business colleges, schools of nursing and universities.
  72. College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma
    'College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma' replaces the category 'Other non-university certificate or diploma' in previous censuses. This category includes accreditation by non-degree-granting institutions such as community colleges, CEGEPs, private business colleges and technical institutes.
  73. University certificate or diploma below bachelor level
    Note: Data quality - Certificate or diploma below the bachelor level

    The overall quality of the 'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' variable from the 2006 Census is acceptable. However, users of the 'University certificate or diploma below the bachelor level' category should know that an unexpected growth in this category was noted compared to the 2001 Census.
    In fact, in the 2001 Census, 2.5% of respondents aged 15 years or over declared such a diploma, compared to 4.4% in 2006, representing 89% growth. This phenomenon was not found in other sources like the Labour Force Survey.
    We recommend users interpret the 2006 Census results for this category with caution.
    For more information on factors that may explain such variances in census data, such as response errors and processing errors, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Appendix B: Data quality, sampling and weighting, confidentiality and random rounding.
    More information is available in the Education Reference Guide, 2006 Census, catalogue number 97-560-GWE2006003.
  74. Total population aged 25 to 34
    'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' refers to the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed based on a hierarchy which is generally related to the amount of time spent 'in-class.' For postsecondary completers, a university education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than a college education, while a college education is considered to be a higher level of education than in the trades. Although some trades requirements may take as long or longer to complete than a given college or university program, the majority of time is spent in on-the-job paid training and less time is spent in the classroom.
  75. High school certificate or equivalent
    'High school certificate or equivalent' includes persons who have graduated from a secondary school or equivalent. Excludes persons with a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. Examples of postsecondary institutions include community colleges, institutes of technology, CEGEPs, private trade schools, private business colleges, schools of nursing and universities.
  76. College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma
    'College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma' replaces the category 'Other non-university certificate or diploma' in previous censuses. This category includes accreditation by non-degree-granting institutions such as community colleges, CEGEPs, private business colleges and technical institutes.
  77. University certificate or diploma below bachelor level
    Note: Data quality - Certificate or diploma below the bachelor level

    The overall quality of the 'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' variable from the 2006 Census is acceptable. However, users of the 'University certificate or diploma below the bachelor level' category should know that an unexpected growth in this category was noted compared to the 2001 Census.
    In fact, in the 2001 Census, 2.5% of respondents aged 15 years or over declared such a diploma, compared to 4.4% in 2006, representing 89% growth. This phenomenon was not found in other sources like the Labour Force Survey.
    We recommend users interpret the 2006 Census results for this category with caution.
    For more information on factors that may explain such variances in census data, such as response errors and processing errors, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Appendix B: Data quality, sampling and weighting, confidentiality and random rounding.
    More information is available in the Education Reference Guide, 2006 Census, catalogue number 97-560-GWE2006003.
  78. Total population aged 35 to 64
    'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' refers to the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed based on a hierarchy which is generally related to the amount of time spent 'in-class.' For postsecondary completers, a university education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than a college education, while a college education is considered to be a higher level of education than in the trades. Although some trades requirements may take as long or longer to complete than a given college or university program, the majority of time is spent in on-the-job paid training and less time is spent in the classroom.
  79. High school certificate or equivalent
    'High school certificate or equivalent' includes persons who have graduated from a secondary school or equivalent. Excludes persons with a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. Examples of postsecondary institutions include community colleges, institutes of technology, CEGEPs, private trade schools, private business colleges, schools of nursing and universities.
  80. College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma
    'College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma' replaces the category 'Other non-university certificate or diploma' in previous censuses. This category includes accreditation by non-degree-granting institutions such as community colleges, CEGEPs, private business colleges and technical institutes.
  81. University certificate or diploma below bachelor level
    Note: Data quality - Certificate or diploma below the bachelor level

    The overall quality of the 'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' variable from the 2006 Census is acceptable. However, users of the 'University certificate or diploma below the bachelor level' category should know that an unexpected growth in this category was noted compared to the 2001 Census.
    In fact, in the 2001 Census, 2.5% of respondents aged 15 years or over declared such a diploma, compared to 4.4% in 2006, representing 89% growth. This phenomenon was not found in other sources like the Labour Force Survey.
    We recommend users interpret the 2006 Census results for this category with caution.
    For more information on factors that may explain such variances in census data, such as response errors and processing errors, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Appendix B: Data quality, sampling and weighting, confidentiality and random rounding.
    More information is available in the Education Reference Guide, 2006 Census, catalogue number 97-560-GWE2006003.
  82. Total population 15 years and over by major field of study (20% sample data)
    'Field of study' is defined as the main discipline or subject of learning. It is collected for the highest certificate, diploma or degree above the high school or secondary school level.

    Note: Major field of study - Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP), Canada, 2000

    For the first time with the 2006 Census, major field of study data were coded with the Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP), Canada, 2000.

    Prior to the 2006 Census, the Major Field of Study Classification (MFS) was used to classify major field of study. We recommend users not make historical comparisons between the two classification systems. Even though some entries in the two classifications are similar, direct comparison would be inappropriate given the much more detailed character of the new classification.

    A theoretical concordance table between the Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) and the Major Field of Study Classification (MFS) showing the definitional relationship between the two classifications was developed. This table is available in the 2006 Census Dictionary (Appendix N). This type of concordance allows users to see the relationship between the two classes of systems based on the definitional aspects of each system. However, users are cautioned that this type of concordance can not be used to convert counts from one classification system to another.
  83. Other
    Includes multidisciplinary/interdisciplinary studies (other).
  84. Total population 15 years and over by location of study (20% sample data)
    'Location of study' refers to the province, territory or country where the highest certificate, diploma or degree above the high school level was completed.
  85. Total population 15 years and over by labour force activity (20% sample data)
    Labour force activity - Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).
  86. In the labour force
    Labour force - Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). In past censuses, this was called 'total labour force.'
  87. Employed
    Employed - Refers to persons 15 years and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006):

    (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice;

    (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.
  88. Unemployed
    Unemployed - Refers to persons 15 years and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either:

    (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks;

    (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job;

    (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.
  89. Not in the labour force
    Not in the labour force - Refers to persons 15 years and over, excluding institutional residents, who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long-term illness or disability.
  90. Participation rate
    Participation rate - Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years and over excluding institutional residents.
  91. Employment rate
    Employment rate - Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years and over excluding institutional residents.
  92. Unemployment rate
    Unemployment rate - Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).
  93. Total experienced labour force 15 years and over by occupational categories (20% sample data)
    Occupation - National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006. Refers to the kind of work persons were doing during the reference week, as determined by their kind of work and the description of the main activities in their job. If the person did not have a job during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 16, 2006), the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 2005. Persons with two or more jobs were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

    Experienced labour force

    Refers to persons 15 years and over, excluding institutional residents who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were employed and the unemployed who had last worked for pay or in self-employment in either 2005 or 2006.
  94. A Management occupations
    Broad occupational category A - Management occupations

    Census data for occupation groups in Broad occupational category A - Management occupations should be used with caution. Some coding errors were made in assigning the appropriate level of management, e.g., senior manager as opposed to middle manager, and in determining the appropriate area of specialization or activity, e.g., a manager of a health care program in a hospital as opposed to a government manager in health policy administration. Some non-management occupations have also been miscoded to management due to confusion over titles such as program manager and project manager. Data users may wish to use data for management occupations in conjunction with other variables such as Income, Age and Education.
  95. Total experienced labour force 15 years and over by industrial categories (20% sample data)
    Industry - North American Industry Classification System 2002. Refers to the general nature of the business carried out in the establishment where the person worked. If the person did not have a job during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 16, 2006), the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 2005. Persons with two or more jobs were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

    Experienced labour force

    Refers to persons 15 years and over, excluding institutional residents who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were employed and the unemployed who had last worked for pay or in self-employment in either 2005 or 2006.
  96. Population 15 years and over reporting hours of unpaid work (20% sample data)
    Persons reporting hours of unpaid work.

    Includes all persons reporting hours of unpaid housework; hours looking after children, without pay; or hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors.
  97. Population 15 years and over reporting hours of unpaid housework
    Refers to the number of persons reporting hours of unpaid housework, yard work or home maintenance in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Unpaid housework includes work for one's own household, for other family members outside the household, and for friends or neighbours.
  98. Population 15 years and over reporting hours looking after children without pay
    Refers to the number of persons reporting hours spent looking after children without pay. It includes hours spent providing unpaid child care for members of one's own household, for other family members outside the household, for friends or neighbours in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).
  99. Population 15 years and over reporting hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors
    Refers to the number of persons reporting hours spent providing unpaid care or assistance to seniors of one's own household, to other senior family members outside the household, and to friends or neighbours in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).
  100. Total population 15 years and over who worked since 2005 (20% sample data)
    Refers to the language used most often at work by the individual at the time of the census. Other languages used at work on a regular basis were also collected.
  101. Total employed labour force 15 years and over by place of work (20% sample data)
    Employed labour force 15 years and over who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006):

    (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice

    (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.
  102. Total employed labour force 15 years and over with a usual place of work or no fixed workplace address by mode of transportation (20% sample data)
    Refers to the mode of transportation to work of non-institutional residents 15 years of age and over who worked at some time since January 1, 2005. Persons who indicate in the place of work question that they either had no fixed workplace address, or specified a usual workplace address, are asked to identify the mode of transportation they usually use to commute from home to work. The variable usually relates to the individual's job in the week prior to enumeration. However, if the person did not work during that week but had worked at some time since January 1, 2005, the information relates to the job held longest during that period.
  103. Total visible minority population
    The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as 'persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.'
  104. South Asian
    For example, East Indian, Pakistani, Sri Lankan, etc.
  105. Southeast Asian
    For example, Vietnamese, Cambodian, Malaysian, Laotian, etc.
  106. West Asian
    For example, Iranian, Afghan, etc.
  107. Visible minority, n.i.e.
    The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere.' Includes respondents who reported a write-in response such as 'Guyanese,' 'West Indian,' 'Kurd,' 'Tibetan,' 'Polynesian,' 'Pacific Islander,' etc.
  108. Multiple visible minority
    Includes respondents who reported more than one visible minority group by checking two or more mark-in circles, e.g., 'Black' and 'South Asian.'
  109. Not a visible minority
    Includes respondents who reported 'Yes' to the Aboriginal identity question (Question 18) as well as respondents who were not considered to be members of a visible minority group.
  110. Persons 15 years and over with earnings (counts) (20% sample data)
    Earnings or employment income - Refers to total income received by persons 15 years and over during calendar year 2005 as wages and salaries, net income from a non-farm unincorporated business and/or professional practice, and/or net farm self-employment income.

    Wages and salaries - Refers to gross wages and salaries before deductions for such items as income tax, pensions and Employment Insurance. Included in this source are military pay and allowances, tips, commissions and cash bonuses, benefits from wage-loss replacement plans or income-maintenance insurance plans, supplementary unemployment benefits from an employer or union as well as all types of casual earnings during calendar year 2005. Other employment income such as taxable benefits, research grants and royalties are included.

    Net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice - Refers to net income (gross receipts minus expenses of operation such as wages, rents and depreciation) received during calendar year 2005 from the respondent's non-farm unincorporated business or professional practice. In the case of partnerships, only the respondent's share was reported. Also included is net income from persons babysitting in their own homes, persons providing room and board to non-relatives, self-employed fishers, hunters and trappers, operators of direct distributorships such as those selling and delivering cosmetics, as well as freelance activities of artists, writers, music teachers, hairdressers, dressmakers, etc.

    Net farm income - Refers to net income (gross receipts from farm sales minus depreciation and cost of operation) received during calendar year 2005 from the operation of a farm, either on the respondent's own account or in partnership. In the case of partnerships, only the respondent's share of income was reported. Included with gross receipts are cash advances received in 2005, dividends from cooperatives, rebates and farm-support payments to farmers from federal, provincial and regional agricultural programs (for example, milk subsidies and marketing board payments) and gross insurance proceeds such as payments from the Net Income Stabilization Account (NISA). The value of income 'in kind', such as agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm, is excluded.

    Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

    Average and median incomes and standard errors for average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (census/economic families, persons not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

    The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics for earnings or any other source of income and after-tax income of individuals 15 years and over.

    Includes persons who did not work in 2005 but reported earnings.
  111. Median earnings - Persons 15 years and over ($)
    For persons with earnings.
  112. Persons 15 years and over with earnings who worked full year, full time (counts)
    Worked 49 to 52 weeks in 2005, mostly full time and reported earnings.
  113. Median earnings - Persons 15 years and over who worked full year, full time ($)
    For persons with earnings.
  114. Persons 15 years and over with income (counts) (20% sample data)
    Total income - Refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years and over:
    • wages and salaries (total)
    • net farm income
    • net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
    • child benefits
    • Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
    • benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
    • benefits from Employment Insurance
    • other income from government sources
    • dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
    • retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
    • other money income.


    After-tax income refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial taxes paid for 2005.

    Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind', such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

    Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

    Average and median incomes and standard errors for average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (census/economic families, persons not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

    These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.
  115. Median income - Persons 15 years and over ($)
    For persons with income.
  116. Median income after tax - Persons 15 years and over ($)
    For persons with after-tax income.
  117. Composition of total income (100%)
    Composition of income of a population group or a geographic area refers to the relative share of each income source or group of sources, expressed as a percentage of the aggregate total income of that group or area. Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding.
  118. Income status of all persons in private households (counts)
    Income status before or after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before-tax or after-tax cut-offs.

    Since each family member shares the income status of that family, percentages in low income can be derived for all persons in private households. For additional information, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary.
Total population (100% data)2 113,355 4,113,485 31,612,895
0 to 4 years 5,325 201,880 1,690,540
5 to 9 years 6,265 220,700 1,809,375
10 to 14 years 7,560 257,025 2,079,925
15 to 19 years 8,020 273,560 2,140,490
15 years 1,705 54,810 442,180
16 years 1,745 55,990 443,670
17 years 1,695 55,745 427,595
18 years 1,515 53,720 411,225
19 years 1,360 53,295 415,825
20 to 24 years 5,360 265,905 2,080,385
25 to 29 years 4,795 245,275 1,985,580
30 to 34 years 5,640 254,575 2,020,225
35 to 39 years 6,725 290,645 2,208,275
40 to 44 years 9,160 334,840 2,610,460
45 to 49 years 10,285 344,140 2,620,595
50 to 54 years 9,940 320,115 2,357,305
55 to 59 years 9,485 289,425 2,084,620
60 to 64 years 7,500 215,590 1,589,870
65 to 69 years 5,520 169,770 1,234,575
70 to 74 years 4,465 143,630 1,053,790
75 to 79 years 3,245 120,440 879,580
80 to 84 years 2,320 89,930 646,700
85 years and over 1,735 76,045 520,610
Median age of the population3 43.9 40.8 39.5
% of the population aged 15 and over 83.1 83.5 82.3
Male, total 56,105 2,013,990 15,475,970
0 to 4 years 2,780 103,295 864,600
5 to 9 years 3,165 113,180 926,855
10 to 14 years 3,760 132,275 1,065,860
15 to 19 years 4,165 140,335 1,095,285
15 years 905 28,205 226,955
16 years 880 28,810 227,695
17 years 865 28,675 219,115
18 years 810 27,560 210,050
19 years 710 27,085 211,475
20 to 24 years 2,775 134,085 1,047,945
25 to 29 years 2,375 120,260 975,945
30 to 34 years 2,665 122,835 987,715
35 to 39 years 3,230 140,560 1,083,495
40 to 44 years 4,365 162,675 1,285,535
45 to 49 years 5,005 167,040 1,290,125
50 to 54 years 4,905 156,595 1,158,970
55 to 59 years 4,755 142,575 1,026,390
60 to 64 years 3,840 106,810 780,135
65 to 69 years 2,865 83,055 593,805
70 to 74 years 2,270 70,200 493,465
75 to 79 years 1,635 55,635 386,485
80 to 84 years 955 36,895 251,420
85 years and over 590 25,685 161,925
Median age of the population 43.7 40.0 38.6
% of the population aged 15 and over 82.7 82.7 81.5
Female, total 57,245 2,099,500 16,136,930
0 to 4 years 2,545 98,590 825,935
5 to 9 years 3,100 107,525 882,515
10 to 14 years 3,800 124,745 1,014,065
15 to 19 years 3,850 133,225 1,045,205
15 years 800 26,600 215,225
16 years 865 27,185 215,980
17 years 830 27,065 208,480
18 years 710 26,160 201,175
19 years 650 26,215 204,350
20 to 24 years 2,585 131,820 1,032,440
25 to 29 years 2,420 125,015 1,009,635
30 to 34 years 2,980 131,740 1,032,515
35 to 39 years 3,490 150,090 1,124,780
40 to 44 years 4,800 172,165 1,324,925
45 to 49 years 5,280 177,095 1,330,470
50 to 54 years 5,035 163,520 1,198,335
55 to 59 years 4,730 146,845 1,058,230
60 to 64 years 3,660 108,780 809,730
65 to 69 years 2,650 86,715 640,770
70 to 74 years 2,190 73,430 560,320
75 to 79 years 1,610 64,800 493,090
80 to 84 years 1,365 53,035 395,280
85 years and over 1,150 50,360 358,685
Median age of the population 44.1 41.5 40.4
% of the population aged 15 and over 83.5 84.2 83.1
Total population 15 years and over by common-law status (100% data)4 94,200 3,433,885 26,033,060
Not in a common-law relationship 83,500 3,154,000 23,301,420
In a common-law relationship 10,700 279,880 2,731,635
Total population 15 years and over by legal marital status (100% data)5 94,205 3,433,885 26,033,060
Never legally married (single)6 27,050 1,102,395 9,087,030
Legally married (and not separated)7 47,435 1,730,480 12,470,400
Separated, but still legally married8 3,735 110,575 775,425
Divorced9 10,265 285,865 2,087,385
Widowed10 5,715 204,565 1,612,820
Total private dwellings occupied by usual residents (20% sample data)11 47,720 1,643,150 12,437,470
Single-detached houses - as a % of total occupied private dwellings 70.3 49.2 55.3
Semi-detached houses - as a % of total occupied private dwellings 5.9 3.1 4.8
Row houses - as a % of total occupied private dwellings 6.0 6.9 5.6
Apartments, duplex - as a % of total occupied private dwellings12 1.8 10.0 5.3
Apartments in buildings with fewer than five storeys - as a % of total occupied private dwellings13 11.0 20.9 18.4
Apartments in buildings with five or more storeys - as a % of total occupied private dwellings 0.2 7.1 8.9
Other dwellings - as a % of total occupied private dwellings14 4.8 2.8 1.6
Number of owned dwellings15 36,420 1,145,050 8,509,780
Number of rented dwellings16 11,110 493,995 3,878,500
Number of dwellings constructed before 1986 28,685 1,017,335 8,610,600
Number of dwellings constructed between 1986 and 200617 19,035 625,815 3,826,870
Dwellings requiring major repair - as a % of total occupied private dwellings 9.0 7.4 7.5
Average number of rooms per dwelling18 7.0 6.0 6.0
Dwellings with more than one person per room - as a % of total occupied private dwellings19 0.7 1.9 1.5
Average value of owned dwelling ($)20 297,784 418,703 263,369
Total number of census families (20% sample data)21 33,845 1,161,425 8,896,840
Number of married-couple families22 23,220 844,430 6,105,910
Number of common-law-couple families23 5,395 141,825 1,376,870
Number of lone-parent families 5,235 175,160 1,414,065
Number of female lone-parent families 4,015 139,770 1,132,290
Number of male lone-parent families 1,215 35,390 281,775
Average number of persons in all census families 2.8 2.9 2.9
Average number of persons in married-couple families24 2.8 3.0 3.1
Average number of persons in common-law-couple families25 2.8 2.6 2.8
Average number of persons in lone-parent families 2.6 2.5 2.5
Average number of persons in female lone-parent families 2.6 2.5 2.5
Average number of persons in male lone-parent families 2.4 2.4 2.4
Median income in 2005 - All census families ($)26 58,797 62,346 63,866
Median income in 2005 - Married-couple families ($)27 66,228 69,207 71,665
Median income in 2005 - Common-law-couple families ($)28 56,147 62,202 63,811
Median income in 2005 - Lone-parent families ($) 28,602 35,437 36,465
Median income in 2005 - Female lone-parent families ($) 26,620 33,592 34,350
Median income in 2005 - Male lone-parent families ($) 39,648 45,332 47,153
Median after-tax income in 2005 - All census families ($)29 51,440 54,737 55,111
Median after-tax income in 2005 - Married-couple families ($)30 57,220 60,126 61,221
Median after-tax income in 2005 - Common-law-couple families ($) 49,775 54,288 54,815
Median after-tax income in 2005 - Lone-parent families ($) 28,159 33,431 34,205
Median after-tax income in 2005 - Female lone-parent families ($) 26,033 31,946 32,609
Median after-tax income in 2005 - Male lone-parent families ($) 36,200 40,649 41,661
Total private households (20% sample data)31 47,720 1,643,145 12,437,470
Households containing a couple (married or common-law) with children32 11,310 432,420 3,543,605
Households containing a couple (married or common-law) without children33 16,565 486,040 3,601,315
One-person households 12,975 460,580 3,327,050
Other household types34 6,870 264,110 1,965,495
Median income in 2005 - All private households ($)35 48,594 52,709 53,634
Median income in 2005 - Couple households with children ($)36 76,275 79,509 82,156
Median income in 2005 - Couple households without children ($)37 58,679 63,969 62,503
Median income in 2005 - One-person households ($) 25,414 27,773 26,720
Median income in 2005 - Other household types ($)38 38,759 47,266 46,347
Median after-tax income in 2005 - All private households ($)39 43,047 46,472 46,584
Median after-tax income in 2005 - Couple households with children ($)40 65,574 68,639 69,711
Median after-tax income in 2005 - Couple households without children ($)41 51,345 55,748 53,667
Median after-tax income in 2005 - One-person households ($) 22,790 24,987 23,888
Median after-tax income in 2005 - Other household types ($)42 35,921 43,242 42,053
Median monthly payments for rented dwellings ($)43 642 752 671
Median monthly payments for owner-occupied dwellings ($)44 641 876 839
Average household size 2.3 2.5 2.5
Total population by mother tongue (20% sample data)45 112,780 4,074,385 31,241,030
English only 101,595 2,875,775 17,882,780
French only 2,300 54,740 6,817,650
English and French 115 5,920 98,630
Other language(s)46 8,770 1,137,945 6,441,975
Total population by knowledge of official languages (20% sample data)47 112,780 4,074,385 31,241,030
English only 104,030 3,653,365 21,129,945
French only 40 2,070 4,141,850
English and French 8,350 295,645 5,448,850
Neither English nor French 355 123,300 520,385
Total population by home language (20% sample data)48 112,780 4,074,380 31,241,030
English 109,355 3,341,290 20,584,775
French 710 15,325 6,608,120
Non-official language 2,270 639,380 3,472,130
English and French 155 3,615 94,060
English and non-official language 275 73,730 406,455
French and non-official language 0 465 58,885
English, French and non-official language 0 585 16,600
Total population by immigrant status (20% sample data)49 112,775 4,074,385 31,241,030
Non-immigrants50 98,855 2,904,240 24,788,725
Immigrants51 13,615 1,119,215 6,186,950
Before 1991 11,125 605,685 3,408,420
1991 to 2000 1,675 335,695 1,668,550
2001 to 200652 815 177,840 1,109,980
Non-permanent residents53 300 50,925 265,355
Total population by citizenship (20% sample data)54 112,775 4,074,385 31,241,030
Canadian citizens 109,885 3,761,230 29,480,165
Canadian citizens under age 18 24,060 801,105 6,604,290
Canadian citizens age 18 and over 85,825 2,960,125 22,875,880
Not Canadian citizens55 2,895 313,155 1,760,865
Total population 15 years and over by generation status (20% sample data)56 93,575 3,394,910 25,664,220
1st generation57 14,005 1,121,545 6,124,560
2nd generation58 20,380 754,835 4,006,420
3rd generation or more59 59,190 1,518,530 15,533,240
Total population 1 year and over by mobility status 1 year ago (20% sample data)60 111,845 4,034,390 30,897,210
Lived at the same address 1 year ago 92,935 3,348,275 26,534,115
Lived within the same province or territory 1 year ago, but changed addresses within the same census subdivision (municipality) 9,665 374,695 2,554,260
Lived within the same province or territory 1 year ago, but changed addresses from another census subdivision (municipality) within the same province or territory 6,520 194,090 1,221,560
Lived in a different province or territory 1 year ago 2,215 55,860 289,745
Lived in a different country 1 year ago 510 61,465 297,530
Total population 5 years and over by mobility status 5 years ago (20% sample data)61 107,430 3,871,915 29,544,485
Lived at the same address 5 years ago 58,405 2,067,785 17,457,170
Lived within the same province or territory 5 years ago, but changed addresses within the same census subdivision (municipality) 21,720 904,705 6,507,905
Lived within the same province or territory 5 years ago, but changed addresses from another census subdivision (municipality) within the same province or territory 18,565 528,500 3,566,790
Lived in a different province or territory 5 years ago 7,205 164,710 852,580
Lived in a different country 5 years ago 1,530 206,210 1,160,040
Total Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal identity population (20% sample data)62 112,775 4,074,385 31,241,030
Total Aboriginal identity population63 10,065 196,075 1,172,785
North American Indian single response64 7,680 129,580 698,025
Métis single response 2,045 59,445 389,785
Inuit single response 35 795 50,480
Multiple Aboriginal identity responses 45 1,655 7,740
Aboriginal responses not included elsewhere65 260 4,600 26,760
Non-Aboriginal identity population 102,710 3,878,310 30,068,240
Total population 15 years and over by educational attainment (20% sample data)66 93,575 3,394,905 25,664,220
No certificate, diploma or degree 21,530 675,345 6,098,325
High school certificate or equivalent67 26,800 946,645 6,553,425
Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma 13,450 368,355 2,785,420
College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma68 16,835 565,900 4,435,135
University certificate or diploma below bachelor level69 3,625 184,395 1,136,145
University certificate, diploma or degree at bachelor's level or above 11,335 654,260 4,655,770
Total population aged 15 to 2470 13,305 538,010 4,207,810
No certificate, diploma or degree 6,465 200,895 1,679,015
High school certificate or equivalent71 4,900 222,060 1,528,010
Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma 545 20,745 185,170
College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma72 870 43,660 458,380
University certificate or diploma below bachelor level73 195 16,285 87,420
University certificate, diploma or degree at bachelor's level or above 325 34,355 269,810
Total population aged 25 to 3474 10,445 497,715 3,987,075
No certificate, diploma or degree 1,780 46,860 433,940
High school certificate or equivalent75 3,105 130,165 897,830
Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma 1,370 46,035 416,045
College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma76 2,415 99,325 906,155
University certificate or diploma below bachelor level77 345 30,815 181,350
University certificate, diploma or degree at bachelor's level or above 1,425 144,505 1,151,750
Total population aged 35 to 6478 52,990 1,786,755 13,395,040
No certificate, diploma or degree 8,045 235,340 2,249,565
High school certificate or equivalent79 14,945 461,105 3,258,905
Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma 8,670 227,410 1,739,965
College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma80 11,190 347,685 2,627,220
University certificate or diploma below bachelor level81 2,350 108,205 685,385
University certificate, diploma or degree at bachelor's level or above 7,785 407,010 2,833,995
Total population 15 years and over by major field of study (20% sample data)82 93,575 3,394,910 25,664,220
No postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree 48,325 1,621,990 12,651,750
Education 4,045 135,905 994,665
Visual and performing arts, and communications technologies 1,330 76,390 481,190
Humanities 1,580 101,880 717,125
Social and behavioural sciences and law 2,995 177,185 1,275,100
Business, management and public administration 8,200 366,975 2,801,725
Physical and life sciences and technologies 1,185 63,415 451,960
Mathematics, computer and information sciences 920 66,200 568,755
Architecture, engineering, and related technologies 11,080 385,325 2,922,080
Agriculture, natural resources and conservation 2,210 45,020 291,510
Health, parks, recreation and fitness 7,560 252,655 1,728,890
Personal, protective and transportation services 4,140 101,725 777,370
Other83 0 245 2,100
Total population 15 years and over by location of study (20% sample data)84 93,575 3,394,910 25,664,220
No postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree 48,330 1,621,990 12,651,750
Postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree 45,250 1,772,915 13,012,475
Inside Canada 39,850 1,365,495 10,948,685
Outside Canada 5,390 407,420 2,063,785
Total population 15 years and over by labour force activity (20% sample data)85 93,575 3,394,910 25,664,220
In the labour force86 58,410 2,226,380 17,146,135
Employed87 53,825 2,092,770 16,021,180
Unemployed88 4,585 133,615 1,124,955
Not in the labour force89 35,170 1,168,525 8,518,090
Participation rate90 62.4 65.6 66.8
Employment rate91 57.5 61.6 62.4
Unemployment rate92 7.8 6.0 6.6
Total experienced labour force 15 years and over by occupational categories (20% sample data)93 57,305 2,193,115 16,861,180
A Management occupations94 5,250 229,945 1,631,730
B Business, finance and administration occupations 7,635 375,975 3,025,425
C Natural and applied sciences and related occupations 3,190 138,955 1,108,045
D Health occupations 3,075 120,365 950,360
E Occupations in social science, education, government service and religion 4,140 178,040 1,414,320
F Occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport 1,495 76,460 502,195
G Sales and service occupations 15,245 555,880 4,037,720
H Trades, transport and equipment operators and related occupations 9,590 339,495 2,550,295
I Occupations unique to primary industry 5,415 86,460 648,310
J Occupations unique to processing, manufacturing and utilities 2,275 91,545 992,765
Total experienced labour force 15 years and over by industrial categories (20% sample data)95 57,305 2,193,115 16,861,180
Agriculture and other resource-based industries 7,220 107,760 895,415
Construction 4,485 166,100 1,069,095
Manufacturing 4,050 189,120 2,005,980
Wholesale trade 1,180 92,020 739,305
Retail trade 7,510 248,955 1,917,170
Finance and real estate 2,420 134,940 992,720
Health care and social services 5,655 213,090 1,716,255
Educational services 3,880 152,565 1,150,535
Business services 8,170 436,665 3,103,195
Other services 12,745 451,905 3,271,505
Population 15 years and over reporting hours of unpaid work (20% sample data)96 86,350 3,101,125 23,496,920
Population 15 years and over reporting hours of unpaid housework97 85,475 3,059,710 23,178,395
Population 15 years and over reporting hours looking after children without pay98 32,380 1,194,960 9,625,655
Population 15 years and over reporting hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors99 15,380 593,385 4,724,325
Total population 15 years and over who worked since 2005 (20% sample data)100 64,350 2,419,215 18,418,100
English 63,670 2,308,370 14,064,105
French 260 5,530 3,724,975
Non-official language 240 79,415 273,830
English and French 105 2,970 252,295
English and non-official language 80 22,435 86,820
French and non-official language 0 125 5,055
English, French and non-official language 0 370 11,025
Total employed labour force 15 years and over by place of work (20% sample data)101 53,825 2,092,770 16,021,180
Worked at home 5,025 188,760 1,230,355
Worked outside Canada 175 13,960 76,570
No fixed workplace address 8,920 274,055 1,644,360
Worked at usual place 39,700 1,616,000 13,069,895
Worked in census subdivision (municipality) of residence 22,055 787,185 7,814,510
Worked in a different census subdivision (municipality) within the census division (county) of residence 15,355 746,830 2,687,845
Worked in a different census division (county) 1,875 72,020 2,420,290
Worked in a different province 410 9,965 147,250
Total employed labour force 15 years and over with a usual place of work or no fixed workplace address by mode of transportation (20% sample data)102 48,625 1,890,055 14,714,260
Car, truck, van, as driver 36,870 1,353,790 10,644,330
Car, truck, van, as passenger 3,875 145,845 1,133,145
Public transit 880 195,150 1,622,725
Walked or bicycled 5,160 167,650 1,134,805
All other modes 1,835 27,620 179,250
Total population by visible minority groups (20% sample data) 112,780 4,074,385 31,241,030
Total visible minority population103 3,415 1,008,855 5,068,095
Chinese 780 407,225 1,216,565
South Asian104 315 262,290 1,262,865
Black 440 28,315 783,795
Filipino 560 88,075 410,695
Latin American 250 28,960 304,245
Southeast Asian105 455 40,690 239,935
Arab 40 8,635 265,550
West Asian106 10 29,810 156,700
Korean 110 50,495 141,890
Japanese 340 35,060 81,300
Visible minority, n.i.e.107 45 3,880 71,420
Multiple visible minority108 55 25,415 133,120
Not a visible minority109 109,360 3,065,525 26,172,935
Persons 15 years and over with earnings (counts) (20% sample data)110 64,075 2,392,805 18,201,265
Median earnings - Persons 15 years and over ($)111 21,843 25,722 26,850
Persons 15 years and over with earnings who worked full year, full time (counts)112 25,675 1,113,365 9,275,770
Median earnings - Persons 15 years and over who worked full year, full time ($)113 40,542 42,230 41,401
Persons 15 years and over with income (counts) (20% sample data)114 88,665 3,230,560 24,423,165
Median income - Persons 15 years and over ($)115 23,929 24,867 25,615
Median income after tax - Persons 15 years and over ($)116 21,972 22,785 23,307
Composition of total income (100%)117 100 100 100
Earnings - As a % of total income 69.8 75.1 76.2
Government transfers - As a % of total income 14.2 10.7 11.1
Other money - As a % of total income 16.0 14.2 12.7
Income status of all persons in private households (counts)118 108,180 3,978,210 30,628,935
% in low income before tax - All persons 15.0 17.3 15.3
% in low income after tax - All persons 10.5 13.1 11.4
% in low income before tax - Persons less than 18 years of age 18.0 19.6 17.7
% in low income after tax - Persons less than 18 years of age 11.8 14.9 13.1
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