1996 Census of Canada: Electronic Area Profiles

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Profile of Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order), 1996 Census

About this tabulation

General information

Catalogue number:95F0180XDB96001
Release date:October 29, 1998
Topic:Profile: All Variables
Data dimensions:

Note

Updated March 17, 1999.


Non-permanent Residents

In 1991 and 1996, the Census of Population enumerated both permanent and non-permanent residents of Canada. Non-permanent residents are persons who held a student or employment authorization, Minister's permit or who were refugee claimants, as well as family members living with them, at the time of the Census.

Prior to 1991, only permanent residents of Canada were included in the census. (The only exception to this occurred in 1941.) Non-permanent residents were considered foreign residents and were not enumerated.

Today in Canada, non-permanent residents make up a significant segment of the population, especially in several census metropolitan areas. Their presence can affect the demand for such government services as health care, schooling, employment programs and language training. The inclusion of non-permanent residents in the census facilitates comparisons with provincial and territorial statistics (marriages, divorces, births and deaths) which include this population. In addition, this inclusion of non-permanent residents brings Canadian practice closer to the UN recommendation that long-term residents (persons living in a country for one year or longer) be enumerated in the census.

According to the 1991 Census, there were 223,410 non-permanent residents in Canada, representing slightly less than 1% of the total population. There were fewer non-permanent residents in Canada at the time of the 1996 Census: 166,715 non-permanent residents or 0.6% of the total population in 1996.

Total population counts, as well as counts for all variables, are affected by this change in the census universe. Users should be especially careful when comparing data from 1991 or 1996 with data from previous censuses in geographic areas where there is a concentration of non-permanent residents. These include the major metropolitan areas in Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia.

Although every attempt has been made to enumerate non-permanent residents, factors such as language difficulties and the reluctance to complete a government form or understand the need to participate may have affected the enumeration of this population and resulted in undercounting.


Ethnic Origin Area Profile Description:

This table shows counts for the 100 most frequently reported ethnic origins in Canada, based on single response counts (persons who reported one ethnic origin only).

Respondents who reported one ethnic origin are included in the single response row. Respondents who reported more than one ethnic origin are included in the multiple response row for each ethnic group they reported. The total response row indicates the number of respondents who reported each ethnic origin.

Users should be careful when interpreting multiple response counts because respondents who reported more than one ethnic origin are counted in the multiple response row for each ethnic origin they reported. This table cannot be used to calculate the ethnic distribution of the population.

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'. It is used to denote a residual ethnic grouping which contains either a very general ethnic response or several ethnic origins not included as separate groups within an ethnic category. For example, the group 'African (Black), n.i.e.' includes responses such as 'African', 'African Black', 'West African', 'Senegalese', 'Zimbabwean', 'Bantu', 'Zulu', etc.

Comparability of ethnic origin data between the 1996 Census and previous censuses has been affected by several factors, including changes in the question format, wording, examples (such as 'Canadian'), instructions and data processing, as well as by the social environment at the time of the census. The 1996 Census required that respondents write in their ethnic origin(s) on four write-in lines, whereas previous censuses provided the respondent with both mark-in categories and write-in lines.

For more information on ethnic origin, please refer to the 'User Guide: Ethnic Origin' in the electronic documentation supplied with this product. (C:\Rec96cen\Document\English\Other\Ethnic.txt)


Visible Minority Population Area Profile Description:

This table provides counts of the visible minority population as defined for employment equity purposes. The 1996 Census was the first census to ask a direct question to provide data on visible minorities. The data included in this table are obtained from the population group question (Question 19).

The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as 'persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour'. The mark-in groups, other than 'White', listed in the population group question are those that are likely to be members of a visible minority group.

For more information on the visible minority population, please refer to the 'User Guide: Visible Minority and Population Group' in the electronic documentation supplied with this product. (C:\Rec96cen\Document\English\Other\Pop.txt)


Note: For information on the comparability of Labour Force Activity data with those of previous censuses and with the Labour Force Survey, see Appendix E in the electronic documentation supplied with this product.


Data Quality Notes: Industry Divisions

Division N - Government Service Industries: The entire Government Service Industries Division is a difficult area to code. Census respondents tend to give the response 'government' for any number of administrative government or government-related activities. The classification calls for most government-related activities to be coded to divisions other than Government Service Industries. For example, road maintenance services or postal services are not coded to the Government Service Industries Division. For these industries and others of similar type, detailed descriptions are required for accurate coding. Detailed descriptions are often not given on Census questionnaires. Users should be cautious when dealing with estimates of the Government Service Industries Division taken from the Census.

Division P - Health and Social Service Industries and Division R - Other Service Industries are affected by changes in the instructions given to coders for the coding of 'babysitters'.

In 1986 and 1991, the instructions read:

- Babysitters who perform this task in their own home are coded to 979 - Other Personal and Household Services.
- Babysitters who perform childcare in another person's home (including live-in babysitters) are coded to 974 - Private Households.
- Babysitters who are employed by an agency are coded to 864 - Non-institutional Social Services.

In 1996, the instructions read:

- Babysitters who babysit in another person's home are coded to 979 - Other Personal and Household Services (e.g. this code would include teenagers doing babysitting for neighbours).
- Babysitters who take children into their own home are coded to 864 - Non-institutional Social Services.

Exceptions:
- Live-in babysitters/nannies who perform childcare in another person's home are coded to 974 - Private Households.
- Babysitters who are employed by an agency (whether or not they work in their own home) are coded to 979 - Other Personal and Household Services.

These instructions differ significantly. Only the live-in babysitters/nannies would receive the same code in 1991 and 1996. At the Division level, these revisions should lead to fewer respondents coded to Division R and more respondents coded to Divison P. Clients should be aware of these changes when trying to make comparisons of 1996 Census data to those from the 1986 and/or 1991 Censuses.


Data table

Select data categories for this table


Geography = Oak Ridges
Profile of Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)(1696) Values

Footnotes

Footnote 1

These figures have not been subjected to random rounding.

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Footnote 2

Age

Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 14, 1996). This variable is derived from date of birth.


Sex

Refers to the gender of the respondent.

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Footnote 3

Legal Marital Status

Refers to the legal conjugal status of a person.

The various responses are defined as follows:

Legally married (and not separated) *
Persons whose husband or wife is living, unless the couple is separated or a divorce has been obtained.

Separated, but still legally married
Persons currently married, but who are no longer living with their spouse (for any reason other than illness or work) and have not obtained a divorce.

Divorced
Persons who have obtained a legal divorce and who have not remarried.

Widowed
Persons who have lost their spouse through death and who have not remarried.

Never married (single)
Persons who have never married (including all persons less than 15 years of age) and persons whose marriage has been annulled and who have not remarried.

* In 1996, Aboriginal people married according to traditional customs were instructed to report themselves as legally married.

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Footnote 4

Census Family

Refers to a now-married couple (with or without never-married sons and/or daughters of either or both spouses), a couple living common-law (with or without never-married sons and/or daughters of either or both partners) or a lone parent of any marital status, with at least one never-married son or daughter living in the same dwelling.

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Footnote 5

Census Family Structure

Refers to the classification of census families into families of now-married couples (with or without never-married sons or daughters of either or both spouses), families of common-law couples (with or without never-married sons or daughters of either or both partners) and lone-parent families by sex of parent.

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Footnote 6

Census Family Structure

Refers to the classification of census families into families of now-married couples (with or without never-married sons or daughters of either or both spouses), families of common-law couples (with or without never-married sons or daughters of either or both partners) and lone-parent families by sex of parent.

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Footnote 7

The average number of never-married sons and/or daughters at home per family is calculated using the total number of never-married sons and/or daughters at home and the total number of families.

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Footnote 8

Census Family Living Arrangements

Refers to the classification of persons in terms of whether they are members of a family household or a non-family household,* and whether they are family or non-family persons.**

*Household Type
Refers to the basic division of private households into family and non-family households. Family household refers to a household that contains at least one census family, that is a married couple with or without never-married sons or daughters, or a couple living common-law with or without never-married sons or daughters, or a lone parent living with one or more never-married sons or daughters (lone-parent family). One-family household refers to a single census family (with or without other non-family persons) that occupies a private dwelling. Multiple-family household refers to one in which two or more census families (with or without additional non-family persons) occupy the same private dwelling.

Non-family household refers to either one person living alone in a private dwelling or to a group of two or more people who share a private dwelling, but who do not constitute a census family.

**Census Family Status
Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not they are members of a census family.

Family persons refers to household members who belong to a census family. They, in turn, are further classified as follows:

Spouses refers to persons of opposite sex who are legally married to each other and living in the same dwelling.

Common-law partners are two persons of opposite sex who are not legally married to each other but live together as husband and wife in the same dwelling.

Lone parent refers to a mother or a father, with no spouse or common-law partner present, living in a dwelling with one or more never-married sons and/or daughters.

Never-married sons and/or daughters refers to blood, step or adopted sons and daughters who have never married (regardless of age) and are living in the same dwelling as their parent(s). Sons and daughters who are currently or were previously married, or who are living common-law, are not considered to be members of their parent(s)' census family even if they are living in the same dwelling. In addition, those never-married sons and daughters who do not live in the same dwelling as their parent(s) are not considered members of their parent(s)' census family.

Non-family persons refers to household members who do not belong to a census family. They may be related to Person 1, the household reference person (e.g., Person 1's divorced brother, brother-in-law, cousin, grandparent), or unrelated (e.g., lodger, room-mate, employee). A person living alone is always a non-family person.

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Footnote 9

Non-relatives may be present.

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Footnote 10

These non-relatives must constitute a census family.

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Footnote 11

Census Family Living Arrangements

Refers to the classification of persons in terms of whether they are members of a family household or a non-family household,* and whether they are family or non-family persons.**

*Household Type
Refers to the basic division of private households into family and non-family households. Family household refers to a household that contains at least one census family, that is a married couple with or without never-married sons or daughters, or a couple living common-law with or without never-married sons or daughters, or a lone parent living with one or more never-married sons or daughters (lone-parent family). One-family household refers to a single census family (with or without other non-family persons) that occupies a private dwelling. Multiple-family household refers to one in which two or more census families (with or without additional non-family persons) occupy the same private dwelling.

Non-family household refers to either one person living alone in a private dwelling or to a group of two or more people who share a private dwelling, but who do not constitute a census family.

**Census Family Status
Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not they are members of a census family.

Family persons refers to household members who belong to a census family. They, in turn, are further classified as follows:

Spouses refers to persons of opposite sex who are legally married to each other and living in the same dwelling.

Common-law partners are two persons of opposite sex who are not legally married to each other but live together as husband and wife in the same dwelling.

Lone parent refers to a mother or a father, with no spouse or common-law partner present, living in a dwelling with one or more never-married sons and/or daughters.

Never-married sons and/or daughters refers to blood, step or adopted sons and daughters who have never married (regardless of age) and are living in the same dwelling as their parent(s). Sons and daughters who are currently or were previously married, or who are living common-law, are not considered to be members of their parent(s)' census family even if they are living in the same dwelling. In addition, those never-married sons and daughters who do not live in the same dwelling as their parent(s) are not considered members of their parent(s)' census family.

Non-family persons refers to household members who do not belong to a census family. They may be related to Person 1, the household reference person (e.g., Person 1's divorced brother, brother-in-law, cousin, grandparent), or unrelated (e.g., lodger, room-mate, employee). A person living alone is always a non-family person.

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Footnote 12

Non-relatives may be present.


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Footnote 13

These non-relatives must constitute a census family.


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Footnote 14

Occupied Private Dwelling

Refers to a private dwelling in which a person or a group of persons are permanently residing. Also included are private dwellings whose usual residents are temporarily absent on Census Day. Unless otherwise specified, all data in housing reports are for occupied private dwellings rather than unoccupied private dwellings or dwellings occupied solely by foreign and/or temporary residents.


Structural Type of Dwelling

Refers to the structural characteristics and/or dwelling configuration, that is, whether the dwelling is a single-detached house, an apartment in a high-rise building, a row house, a mobile home, etc.

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Footnote 15

Includes mobile homes and other movable dwellings such as houseboats and railroad cars.

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Footnote 16

Private Household

Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.


Household Size

Refers to the number of persons in a private household.

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Footnote 17

Citizenship

Refers to legal citizenship status of the respondent. Persons who are citizens of more than one country were instructed to indicate this fact.

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Footnote 18

Place of Birth

Refers to specific provinces or territories if born in Canada or to specific countries if born outside Canada.

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Footnote 19

Includes persons born in a province other than the province of residence, as well as persons born outside Canada who have Canadian citizenship by birth and, therefore, will not have immigrated to Canada.

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Footnote 20

The countries shown are the 50 most frequent ones for the total immigrant population for Canada.


Immigrant: Immigrant Population

Refers to people who are, or have been, landed immigrants in Canada. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others are recent arrivals. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number were born in Canada.

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Footnote 21

Includes persons who reported 'Yugoslavia', whether they referred to the former or to the new republic of the same name.

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Footnote 22

The official name is Islamic Republic of Iran.

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Footnote 23

The official name is the Republic of Korea.

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Footnote 24

Includes Faroe Islands.

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Footnote 25

Includes persons who reported 'Czechoslovakia'.


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Footnote 26

Formerly known as Kampuchea.

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Footnote 27

Refers to persons who, at the time of the census, held a student or employment authorization, Minister's permit or who were refugee claimants, as well as family members living with them.

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Footnote 28

The countries shown are the 40 most frequent ones for those who immigrated to Canada between 1991 and 1996 (first four months only of 1996).


Place of Birth

Refers to specific provinces or territories if born in Canada or to specific countries if born outside Canada.


Immigrant: Immigrant Population

Refers to people who are, or have been, landed immigrants in Canada. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others are recent arrivals. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number were born in Canada.

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Footnote 29

Includes persons who reported 'Yugoslavia', whether they referred to the former or to the new republic of the same name.

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Footnote 30

The official name is Islamic Republic of Iran.

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Footnote 31

The official name is the Republic of Korea.

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Footnote 32

In previous censuses, Ethiopia included Eritrea, but in 1996, Eritrea was collected as a separate country.

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Footnote 33

Immigration: Period of Immigration

Refers to groupings of years derived from the year of immigration question. Year of immigration refers to the year landed immigrant status was first obtained.

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Footnote 34

Includes the first four months only of 1996.

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Footnote 35

Immigration: Age at Immigration

Refers to the age at which the respondent first obtained landed immigrant status. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities.

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Footnote 36

Language: Mother Tongue

Refers to the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood by the individual at the time of the census.

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Footnote 37

This is a subtotal of all non-official languages collected by the census that are not displayed separately here.


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Footnote 38

Language: Knowledge of Official Languages

Refers to the ability to conduct a conversation in English only, in French only, in both English and French or in neither of the official languages of Canada.

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Footnote 39

Language: First Official Language Spoken

Refers to a variable specified within the framework of the Official Languages Act.

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Footnote 40

The official language minority is English in Quebec and French in all other provinces and territories.

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Footnote 41

The official language minority is English in Quebec and French in all other provinces and territories.

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Footnote 42

Language: Home Language

Refers to the language spoken most often at home by the individual at the time of the census.

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Footnote 43

This is a subtotal of all non-official languages collected by the census that are not displayed separately here.

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Footnote 44

Language: Knowledge of Non-official Languages

Refers to languages, other than English or French, in which the respondent can conduct a conversation.

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Footnote 45

This is a subtotal of all non-official languages collected by the census that are not displayed separately here.

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Footnote 46

Aboriginal Groups

Special Note:

A grouping of the total population into non-Aboriginal or Aboriginal population, with Aboriginal persons further divided into Aboriginal groups, based on their responses to three questions on the 1996 Census form. Included in the Aboriginal population are those persons who reported identifying with at least one Aboriginal group, i.e. North American Indian, Métis or Inuit (Eskimo) and/or who reported being a Treaty Indian or a Registered Indian as defined by the Indian Act of Canada and/or who reported they were members of an Indian Band or First Nation.


Special Note:

Users should be aware that the population counts associated with this variable are more affected than most by the incomplete enumeration of certain Indian reserves and Indian settlements. The extent of the impact will depend on the geographical area under study. In 1996, a total of 77 Indian reserves and Indian settlements were incompletely enumerated by the census. The populations of these 77 communities are not included in the census counts.

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Footnote 47

Users should be aware that the counts for this item are more affected than most by the incomplete enumeration of certain Indian reserves and Indian settlements. The extent of the impact will depend on the geographical area under study. In 1996, a total of 77 Indian reserves and Indian settlements were incompletely enumerated by the census. The populations of these 77 communities are not included in the census counts.

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Footnote 48

Includes those who identified themselves as Registered Indians and/or Band members without Aboriginal identity response.

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Footnote 49

The count for 'Total population by ethnic origin (single and multiple responses) (20% sample data)' represents the total population of Canada, excluding institutional residents. It also represents the sum of persons who reported single ethnic origins and multiple ethnic origins in the census.

The count for 'Total population - Single responses' represents the total number of persons who reported only one ethnic origin in the census. This total is greater than the sum of single responses in this table because not all ethnic origins are shown in this profile.

The count for 'Total population - Multiple responses' represents the total number of persons who reported more than one ethnic origin in the census. This total is greater than the sum of multiple responses in this table because not all ethnic origins are shown in this profile.


Ethnic Origin Supplementary Definition:

Refers to the ethnic or cultural group(s) to which the respondent's ancestors belong. Ethnic or cultural origin refers to the ethnic 'roots' or ancestral background of the population, and should not be confused with citizenship or nationality.

Comparability of ethnic origin data between the 1996 Census and previous censuses has been affected by several factors including changes in the question format, wording, examples, instructions and data processing, as well as by the social environment at the time of the census.

In 1996, comparability with previous census data will be particularly affected by the change in format and the examples provided on the questionnaire. While the 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories and two write-in spaces, in 1996 respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. Twenty-four examples were provided.

The change in format to an open-ended question in 1996 is likely to affect response patterns especially for groups which had been included as mark-in response categories in 1991. In addition, the presence of examples such as 'Canadian', which were not included in previous censuses, may also affect response patterns.

Since 1986, an instruction to specify as many ethnic groups as applicable has been included in the ethnic origin question. This has affected data comparability for all ethnic groups and categories because of the increase in multiple responses. Prior to the 1981 Census, only the respondent's paternal ancestry was to be reported. If multiple ethnic origins were provided, only one origin was captured, resulting in one ethnic origin per respondent. In 1981, multiple origins were allowed and a write-in space was added to the question, although respondents were not instructed to provide more than one origin. In 1986, respondents were permitted to write in up to three origins other than those shown in the mark-in circles. In 1991, they were permitted to write in up to two additional origins. In 1996, four write-in spaces were provided on the questionnaire and up to six ethnic origins were captured.

For more information on ethnic origin, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

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Footnote 50

The count for 'Total population by ethnic origin (single and multiple responses) (20% sample data)' represents the total population of Canada, excluding institutional residents. It also represents the sum of persons who reported single ethnic origins and multiple ethnic origins in the census.

The count for 'Total population - Single responses' represents the total number of persons who reported only one ethnic origin in the census. This total is greater than the sum of single responses in this table because not all ethnic origins are shown in this profile.

The count for 'Total population - Multiple responses' represents the total number of persons who reported more than one ethnic origin in the census. This total is greater than the sum of multiple responses in this table because not all ethnic origins are shown in this profile.

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Footnote 51

The count for 'Total population by ethnic origin (single and multiple responses) (20% sample data)' represents the total population of Canada, excluding institutional residents. It also represents the sum of persons who reported single ethnic origins and multiple ethnic origins in the census.

The count for 'Total population - Single responses' represents the total number of persons who reported only one ethnic origin in the census. This total is greater than the sum of single responses in this table because not all ethnic origins are shown in this profile.

The count for 'Total population - Multiple responses' represents the total number of persons who reported more than one ethnic origin in the census. This total is greater than the sum of multiple responses in this table because not all ethnic origins are shown in this profile.

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Footnote 52

Caution should be used in comparing data for 'Canadian' ethnic origin between censuses.

The increase in the reporting of 'Canadian' is the result of a number of factors. The change in the format of the ethnic origin question between 1996 and 1991 has had an impact on counts for this group.

The 1991 Census questionnaire included fifteen mark-in categories and two write-in spaces for the ethnic origin question. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. Twenty-four examples, including 'Canadian', were provided. 'Canadian' was included as one of the examples on the 1996 Census questionnaire because it was one of the most frequently reported ethnic origins in the 1991 Census.

As a result of the change in format of the ethnic origin question in 1996, many respondents who checked a mark-in category to indicate their ethnic origin in 1991 may have written in 'Canadian' as their ethnic origin in 1996.

Although the increase in the reporting of 'Canadian' ethnic origins may have impacted the reporting of single ethnic origins for many groups, British Isles origins and French origins appear to have been particularly affected.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for 'Canadian', please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

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Footnote 53

Caution should be used in comparing data for 'Canadian' ethnic origin between censuses.

The increase in the reporting of 'Canadian' is the result of a number of factors. The change in the format of the ethnic origin question between 1996 and 1991 has had an impact on counts for this group.

The 1991 Census questionnaire included fifteen mark-in categories and two write-in spaces for the ethnic origin question. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. Twenty-four examples, including 'Canadian', were provided. 'Canadian' was included as one of the examples on the 1996 Census questionnaire because it was one of the most frequently reported ethnic origins in the 1991 Census.

As a result of the change in format of the ethnic origin question in 1996, many respondents who checked a mark-in category to indicate their ethnic origin in 1991 may have written in 'Canadian' as their ethnic origin in 1996.

Although the increase in the reporting of 'Canadian' ethnic origins may have impacted the reporting of single ethnic origins for many groups, British Isles origins and French origins appear to have been particularly affected.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for 'Canadian', please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

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Footnote 54

Caution should be used in comparing data for 'Canadian' ethnic origin between censuses.

The increase in the reporting of 'Canadian' is the result of a number of factors. The change in the format of the ethnic origin question between 1996 and 1991 has had an impact on counts for this group.

The 1991 Census questionnaire included fifteen mark-in categories and two write-in spaces for the ethnic origin question. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. Twenty-four examples, including 'Canadian', were provided. 'Canadian' was included as one of the examples on the 1996 Census questionnaire because it was one of the most frequently reported ethnic origins in the 1991 Census.

As a result of the change in format of the ethnic origin question in 1996, many respondents who checked a mark-in category to indicate their ethnic origin in 1991 may have written in 'Canadian' as their ethnic origin in 1996.

Although the increase in the reporting of 'Canadian' ethnic origins may have impacted the reporting of single ethnic origins for many groups, British Isles origins and French origins appear to have been particularly affected.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for 'Canadian', please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

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Footnote 55

In 1991, 'Taiwanese' was included in 'Chinese'. In 1996, 'Taiwanese' was collected as a separate response.

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Footnote 56

In 1991, 'Taiwanese' was included in 'Chinese'. In 1996, 'Taiwanese' was collected as a separate response.

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Footnote 57

In 1991, 'Taiwanese' was included in 'Chinese'. In 1996, 'Taiwanese' was collected as a separate response.

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Footnote 58

In 1991, 'East Indian, n.i.e.' included 'Goan', 'Gujarati' and 'South Asian, n.i.e.'. In 1996, these groups were collected as separate responses.

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Footnote 59

In 1991, 'East Indian, n.i.e.' included 'Goan', 'Gujarati' and 'South Asian, n.i.e.'. In 1996, these groups were collected as separate responses.

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Footnote 60

In 1991, 'East Indian, n.i.e.' included 'Goan', 'Gujarati' and 'South Asian, n.i.e.'. In 1996, these groups were collected as separate responses.

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Footnote 61

In 1991, 'Frisian' was included in 'Dutch (Netherlands)'. In 1996, 'Frisian' was collected as a separate response.

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Footnote 62

In 1991, 'Frisian' was included in 'Dutch (Netherlands)'. In 1996, 'Frisian' was collected as a separate response.

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Footnote 63

In 1991, 'Frisian' was included in 'Dutch (Netherlands)'. In 1996, 'Frisian' was collected as a separate response.

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Footnote 64

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'Jamaican', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

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Footnote 65

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'Jamaican', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 65 referrer

Footnote 66

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'Jamaican', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 66 referrer

Footnote 67

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'Haitian', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 67 referrer

Footnote 68

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'Haitian', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 68 referrer

Footnote 69

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'Haitian', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 69 referrer

Footnote 70

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as British, Anglo, Celtic, Cornish, Gaelic, Jersey Islander, Manx, United Empire Loyalist, United Kingdom, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: English, Irish, Scottish and Welsh.

Return to footnote 70 referrer

Footnote 71

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as British, Anglo, Celtic, Cornish, Gaelic, Jersey Islander, Manx, United Empire Loyalist, United Kingdom, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: English, Irish, Scottish and Welsh.

Return to footnote 71 referrer

Footnote 72

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as British, Anglo, Celtic, Cornish, Gaelic, Jersey Islander, Manx, United Empire Loyalist, United Kingdom, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: English, Irish, Scottish and Welsh.

Return to footnote 72 referrer

Footnote 73

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as Arab, Assyrian, Kuwaiti, Libyan, Middle Eastern, Saudi Arabian, Yemeni, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Egyptian, Iraqi, Jordanian, Lebanese, Algerian, Berber, Moroccan, Tunisian, Maghrebi n.i.e., Palestinian and Syrian.

Return to footnote 73 referrer

Footnote 74

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as Arab, Assyrian, Kuwaiti, Libyan, Middle Eastern, Saudi Arabian, Yemeni, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Egyptian, Iraqi, Jordanian, Lebanese, Algerian, Berber, Moroccan, Tunisian, Maghrebi n.i.e., Palestinian and Syrian.

Return to footnote 74 referrer

Footnote 75

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as Arab, Assyrian, Kuwaiti, Libyan, Middle Eastern, Saudi Arabian, Yemeni, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Egyptian, Iraqi, Jordanian, Lebanese, Algerian, Berber, Moroccan, Tunisian, Maghrebi n.i.e., Palestinian and Syrian.

Return to footnote 75 referrer

Footnote 76

In 1996, as in 1991, the 'West Indian' ethnic group includes only responses of 'West Indian'. Other British West Indian origins are included in 'Caribbean, n.i.e.' (or 'Other Caribbean, n.i.e.' in 1991). In 1986, 'Other West Indian' was a general group which included responses of 'West Indian' as well as other British West Indian origins.

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'West Indian', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 76 referrer

Footnote 77

In 1996, as in 1991, the 'West Indian' ethnic group includes only responses of 'West Indian'. Other British West Indian origins are included in 'Caribbean, n.i.e.' (or 'Other Caribbean, n.i.e.' in 1991). In 1986, 'Other West Indian' was a general group which included responses of 'West Indian' as well as other British West Indian origins.

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'West Indian', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 77 referrer

Footnote 78

In 1996, as in 1991, the 'West Indian' ethnic group includes only responses of 'West Indian'. Other British West Indian origins are included in 'Caribbean, n.i.e.' (or 'Other Caribbean, n.i.e.' in 1991). In 1986, 'Other West Indian' was a general group which included responses of 'West Indian' as well as other British West Indian origins.

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'West Indian', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 78 referrer

Footnote 79

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as African, Black African, Bantu, Beninese, Cameroonian, Guinean, Ivorian (Black), Malagasy (Black), Malian, Senegalese (Black), Seychellois (Black), Sierra Leonian, Swahili, Togolese, Tutsi, West African, Yoruba, Zambian, Zimbabwean (Black), Zulu, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Black, Burundian, East African, Eritrean, Ethiopian, Ghanaian, Kenyan, Mauritian, Nigerian, Rwandan, Somali, South African, Sudanese, Tanzanian, Ugandan and Zairian.

Caution should be used in comparing data for 'African (Black)' between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 79 referrer

Footnote 80

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as African, Black African, Bantu, Beninese, Cameroonian, Guinean, Ivorian (Black), Malagasy (Black), Malian, Senegalese (Black), Seychellois (Black), Sierra Leonian, Swahili, Togolese, Tutsi, West African, Yoruba, Zambian, Zimbabwean (Black), Zulu, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Black, Burundian, East African, Eritrean, Ethiopian, Ghanaian, Kenyan, Mauritian, Nigerian, Rwandan, Somali, South African, Sudanese, Tanzanian, Ugandan and Zairian.

Caution should be used in comparing data for 'African (Black)' between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 80 referrer

Footnote 81

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as African, Black African, Bantu, Beninese, Cameroonian, Guinean, Ivorian (Black), Malagasy (Black), Malian, Senegalese (Black), Seychellois (Black), Sierra Leonian, Swahili, Togolese, Tutsi, West African, Yoruba, Zambian, Zimbabwean (Black), Zulu, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Black, Burundian, East African, Eritrean, Ethiopian, Ghanaian, Kenyan, Mauritian, Nigerian, Rwandan, Somali, South African, Sudanese, Tanzanian, Ugandan and Zairian.

Caution should be used in comparing data for 'African (Black)' between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 81 referrer

Footnote 82

Caution should be used in comparing data for African origins, including 'Somali', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 82 referrer

Footnote 83

Caution should be used in comparing data for African origins, including 'Somali', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 83 referrer

Footnote 84

Caution should be used in comparing data for African origins, including 'Somali', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 84 referrer

Footnote 85

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as Yugoslav, Montenegrin, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Albanian, Bosnian, Croatian, Macedonian, Serbian and Slovenian.

Return to footnote 85 referrer

Footnote 86

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as Yugoslav, Montenegrin, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Albanian, Bosnian, Croatian, Macedonian, Serbian and Slovenian.

Return to footnote 86 referrer

Footnote 87

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as Yugoslav, Montenegrin, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Albanian, Bosnian, Croatian, Macedonian, Serbian and Slovenian.

Return to footnote 87 referrer

Footnote 88

Caution should be used in comparing data for 'Black' between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

In 1996, a new question was introduced to measure the visible minority population, including Blacks, more directly. Please refer to the 'Visible Minority Population' Area Profile for data on Blacks.

For more information on data for 'Black', please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 88 referrer

Footnote 89

Caution should be used in comparing data for 'Black' between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

In 1996, a new question was introduced to measure the visible minority population, including Blacks, more directly. Please refer to the 'Visible Minority Population' Area Profile for data on Blacks.

For more information on data for 'Black', please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 89 referrer

Footnote 90

Caution should be used in comparing data for 'Black' between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

In 1996, a new question was introduced to measure the visible minority population, including Blacks, more directly. Please refer to the 'Visible Minority Population' Area Profile for data on Blacks.

For more information on data for 'Black', please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 90 referrer

Footnote 91

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as South Asian, Kashmiri, Nepalese, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Bangladeshi, Bengali, East Indian, Goan, Gujarati, Pakistani, Punjabi, Sinhalese, Sri Lankan and Tamil.

In 1991, 'South Asian, n.i.e.' was included in 'East Indian, n.i.e.'. In 1996, 'South Asian, n.i.e.' was collected as a separate response.

Return to footnote 91 referrer

Footnote 92

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as South Asian, Kashmiri, Nepalese, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Bangladeshi, Bengali, East Indian, Goan, Gujarati, Pakistani, Punjabi, Sinhalese, Sri Lankan and Tamil.

In 1991, 'South Asian, n.i.e.' was included in 'East Indian, n.i.e.'. In 1996, 'South Asian, n.i.e.' was collected as a separate response.

Return to footnote 92 referrer

Footnote 93

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as South Asian, Kashmiri, Nepalese, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Bangladeshi, Bengali, East Indian, Goan, Gujarati, Pakistani, Punjabi, Sinhalese, Sri Lankan and Tamil.

In 1991, 'South Asian, n.i.e.' was included in 'East Indian, n.i.e.'. In 1996, 'South Asian, n.i.e.' was collected as a separate response.

Return to footnote 93 referrer

Footnote 94

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'Trinidadian/Tobagonian', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 94 referrer

Footnote 95

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'Trinidadian/Tobagonian', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 95 referrer

Footnote 96

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'Trinidadian/Tobagonian', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 96 referrer

Footnote 97

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'Guyanese', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 97 referrer

Footnote 98

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'Guyanese', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 98 referrer

Footnote 99

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'Guyanese', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 99 referrer

Footnote 100

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as Latin American, Central American, South American, Latino, Bolivian, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Argentinian, Brazilian, Central/South American Indian, Chilean, Colombian, Costa Rican, Ecuadorian, Guatemalan, Hispanic, Honduran, Mexican, Nicaraguan, Panamanian, Paraguayan, Peruvian, Salvadorean, Uruguayan and Venezuelan.

Return to footnote 100 referrer

Footnote 101

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as Latin American, Central American, South American, Latino, Bolivian, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Argentinian, Brazilian, Central/South American Indian, Chilean, Colombian, Costa Rican, Ecuadorian, Guatemalan, Hispanic, Honduran, Mexican, Nicaraguan, Panamanian, Paraguayan, Peruvian, Salvadorean, Uruguayan and Venezuelan.

Return to footnote 101 referrer

Footnote 102

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as Latin American, Central American, South American, Latino, Bolivian, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Argentinian, Brazilian, Central/South American Indian, Chilean, Colombian, Costa Rican, Ecuadorian, Guatemalan, Hispanic, Honduran, Mexican, Nicaraguan, Panamanian, Paraguayan, Peruvian, Salvadorean, Uruguayan and Venezuelan.

Return to footnote 102 referrer

Footnote 103

In 1991, 'Eritrean' was included in 'Ethiopian'. In 1996, 'Eritrean' was collected as a separate response.

Caution should be used in comparing data for African origins, including 'Ethiopian', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 103 referrer

Footnote 104

In 1991, 'Eritrean' was included in 'Ethiopian'. In 1996, 'Eritrean' was collected as a separate response.

Caution should be used in comparing data for African origins, including 'Ethiopian', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 104 referrer

Footnote 105

In 1991, 'Eritrean' was included in 'Ethiopian'. In 1996, 'Eritrean' was collected as a separate response.

Caution should be used in comparing data for African origins, including 'Ethiopian', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 105 referrer

Footnote 106

Caution should be used in comparing data for African origins, including 'Ghanaian' between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 106 referrer

Footnote 107

Caution should be used in comparing data for African origins, including 'Ghanaian' between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 107 referrer

Footnote 108

Caution should be used in comparing data for African origins, including 'Ghanaian' between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 108 referrer

Footnote 109

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'Barbadian', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 109 referrer

Footnote 110

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'Barbadian', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 110 referrer

Footnote 111

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins, including 'Barbadian', between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 111 referrer

Footnote 112

Excludes 'Czech' and 'Slovak' which were collected as separate responses in 1996.

Return to footnote 112 referrer

Footnote 113

Excludes 'Czech' and 'Slovak' which were collected as separate responses in 1996.

Return to footnote 113 referrer

Footnote 114

Excludes 'Czech' and 'Slovak' which were collected as separate responses in 1996.

Return to footnote 114 referrer

Footnote 115

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as Scandinavian, Laplander, Nordic, Viking, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Danish, Icelandic, Norwegian and Swedish.

Return to footnote 115 referrer

Footnote 116

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as Scandinavian, Laplander, Nordic, Viking, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Danish, Icelandic, Norwegian and Swedish.

Return to footnote 116 referrer

Footnote 117

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as Scandinavian, Laplander, Nordic, Viking, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Danish, Icelandic, Norwegian and Swedish.

Return to footnote 117 referrer

Footnote 118

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as Caribbean, Belizian, Dominican, Martiniquais, Montserratian, Puerto Rican, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Antiguan, Bahamian, Barbadian, Bermudan, Cuban, Grenadian, Guyanese, Haitian, Jamaican, Kittitian/Nevisian, St. Lucian, Trinidadian/Tobagonian, Vincentian/Grenadinian and West Indian.

In 1996 'Caribbean, n.i.e.' and in 1991 'Other Caribbean, n.i.e.' included British West Indian origins as well as other Caribbean origins. In 1986, this group included mainly non-British West Indian origins.

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 118 referrer

Footnote 119

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as Caribbean, Belizian, Dominican, Martiniquais, Montserratian, Puerto Rican, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Antiguan, Bahamian, Barbadian, Bermudan, Cuban, Grenadian, Guyanese, Haitian, Jamaican, Kittitian/Nevisian, St. Lucian, Trinidadian/Tobagonian, Vincentian/Grenadinian and West Indian.

In 1996 'Caribbean, n.i.e.' and in 1991 'Other Caribbean, n.i.e.' included British West Indian origins as well as other Caribbean origins. In 1986, this group included mainly non-British West Indian origins.

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 119 referrer

Footnote 120

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as Caribbean, Belizian, Dominican, Martiniquais, Montserratian, Puerto Rican, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Antiguan, Bahamian, Barbadian, Bermudan, Cuban, Grenadian, Guyanese, Haitian, Jamaican, Kittitian/Nevisian, St. Lucian, Trinidadian/Tobagonian, Vincentian/Grenadinian and West Indian.

In 1996 'Caribbean, n.i.e.' and in 1991 'Other Caribbean, n.i.e.' included British West Indian origins as well as other Caribbean origins. In 1986, this group included mainly non-British West Indian origins.

Caution should be used in comparing data for Caribbean origins between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for Caribbean origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 120 referrer

Footnote 121

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as European, Caucasian, Eastern European, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Austrian, Belgian, Dutch (Netherlands), Flemish, Frisian, German, Luxembourger, Swiss, Finnish, Danish, Icelandic, Norwegian, Swedish, Scandinavian n.i.e., Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Byelorussian, Czech, Czechoslovakian, Slovak, Hungarian (Magyar), Polish, Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian, Albanian, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Macedonian, Serbian, Slovenian, Yugoslav n.i.e., Cypriot, Greek, Italian, Maltese, Portuguese, Spanish, Basque, Gypsy (Roma), Jewish and Slav.

Return to footnote 121 referrer

Footnote 122

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as European, Caucasian, Eastern European, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Austrian, Belgian, Dutch (Netherlands), Flemish, Frisian, German, Luxembourger, Swiss, Finnish, Danish, Icelandic, Norwegian, Swedish, Scandinavian n.i.e., Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Byelorussian, Czech, Czechoslovakian, Slovak, Hungarian (Magyar), Polish, Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian, Albanian, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Macedonian, Serbian, Slovenian, Yugoslav n.i.e., Cypriot, Greek, Italian, Maltese, Portuguese, Spanish, Basque, Gypsy (Roma), Jewish and Slav.

Return to footnote 122 referrer

Footnote 123

'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere'.

Includes responses such as European, Caucasian, Eastern European, etc.

Excludes the following groups which were collected as separate responses in 1996: Austrian, Belgian, Dutch (Netherlands), Flemish, Frisian, German, Luxembourger, Swiss, Finnish, Danish, Icelandic, Norwegian, Swedish, Scandinavian n.i.e., Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Byelorussian, Czech, Czechoslovakian, Slovak, Hungarian (Magyar), Polish, Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian, Albanian, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Macedonian, Serbian, Slovenian, Yugoslav n.i.e., Cypriot, Greek, Italian, Maltese, Portuguese, Spanish, Basque, Gypsy (Roma), Jewish and Slav.

Return to footnote 123 referrer

Footnote 124

In 1991, 'Taiwanese' was included in 'Chinese'. In 1996, 'Taiwanese' was collected as a separate response.

Return to footnote 124 referrer

Footnote 125

In 1991, 'Taiwanese' was included in 'Chinese'. In 1996, 'Taiwanese' was collected as a separate response.

Return to footnote 125 referrer

Footnote 126

In 1991, 'Taiwanese' was included in 'Chinese'. In 1996, 'Taiwanese' was collected as a separate response.

Return to footnote 126 referrer

Footnote 127

In 1991, 'Eritrean' was included in 'Ethiopian'. In 1996, 'Eritrean' was collected as a separate response.

Caution should be used in comparing data for African origins between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 127 referrer

Footnote 128

In 1991, 'Eritrean' was included in 'Ethiopian'. In 1996, 'Eritrean' was collected as a separate response.

Caution should be used in comparing data for African origins between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 128 referrer

Footnote 129

In 1991, 'Eritrean' was included in 'Ethiopian'. In 1996, 'Eritrean' was collected as a separate response.

Caution should be used in comparing data for African origins between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 129 referrer

Footnote 130

Caution should be used in comparing data for African origins, including 'Nigerian' between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 130 referrer

Footnote 131

Caution should be used in comparing data for African origins, including 'Nigerian' between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 131 referrer

Footnote 132

Caution should be used in comparing data for African origins, including 'Nigerian' between the 1996 and 1991 censuses.

Data for Caribbean, African and Black origins have been affected by changes in the format of the ethnic origin question and the examples listed on the census questionnaire. The 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories, including 'Black', and two write-in spaces. In 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. The 'Black' mark-in group was replaced with the examples 'Haitian', 'Jamaican' and 'Somali'. Respondents who checked the 'Black' mark-in category in 1991 are likely to have written in an African, Caribbean or other ethnic origin response in 1996.

For more information on ethnic origin, including the historical comparability of data for African origins, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 132 referrer

Footnote 133

Includes respondents who belong to a visible minority group.


Visible Minority Population Supplementary Definition:

Refers to the visible minority group to which the respondent belongs. The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as 'persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour'.

The visible minority population includes the following groups: Chinese, South Asian, Black, Arab/West Asian, Filipino, Southeast Asian, Latin American, Japanese, Korean and Pacific Islander.

The 1996 Census was the first census to ask a direct question on visible minorities. Information on the visible minority population is obtained from the population group question (Question 19).

For more information on the visible minority population, please refer to electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 133 referrer

Footnote 134

Includes respondents who reported a single write-in response indicating a Pacific Islander group (for example, 'Fijian' or 'Polynesian') or another single write-in response likely to be a visible minority group (for example, 'Guyanese', 'Mauritian', 'South American' or 'West Indian'). For more information, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 134 referrer

Footnote 135

Includes respondents who reported more than one visible minority group by checking two or more mark-in circles, for example, 'Black and South Asian'. For more information, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 135 referrer

Footnote 136

Includes respondents who reported 'Yes' to Question 18 (Aboriginal Identity, known in the 1996 Census Dictionary as Aboriginal Self-Reporting) as well as repondents who were not considered to be members of a visible minority group. For more information, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product.

Return to footnote 136 referrer

Footnote 137

Age
Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 14, 1996). This variable is derived from date of birth.


Sex
Refers to the gender of the respondent.


Labour Market Activities: Labour Force Activity
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Respondents were classified as either employed, unemployed or not in the labour force.

Employed
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day:
(a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment; or
(b) were absent from their job or business for the entire week because of vacation, illness, a labour dispute at their place of work or other reasons.

Unemployed
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, were without paid work and were available for work and either:
(a) had actively looked for work in the past four weeks; or
(b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or
(c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Not in Labour Force
Refers to those persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes persons who did not work for pay or in self-employment in the week prior to enumeration and (a) did not look for paid work in the four weeks prior to enumeration, (b) were not on temporary lay-off and (c) did not have a new job to start in four weeks or less. It also includes persons who looked for work during the last four weeks but were not available to start work in the week prior to enumeration.

Total Labour Force (in Reference Week)
Refers to all persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day.

Participation Rate
Refers to the total labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population in that group.

Employment-population Ratio
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The employment-population ratio for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over in that group.

Unemployment Rate
Refers to the unemployed labour force expressed as a percentage of the total labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the total labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Note:
The components of Population and Labour Force Activity are illustrated in Figure 9 of the 1996 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-351-XPE.

For information on the comparability of Labour Force Activity with those of previous censuses and with the Labour Force Survey, see Appendix E of the 1996 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-351-XPE.

Return to footnote 137 referrer

Footnote 138

Age
Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 14, 1996). This variable is derived from date of birth.


Sex
Refers to the gender of the respondent.


Labour Market Activities: Labour Force Activity
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Respondents were classified as either employed, unemployed or not in the labour force.

Employed
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day:
(a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment; or
(b) were absent from their job or business for the entire week because of vacation, illness, a labour dispute at their place of work or other reasons.

Unemployed
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, were without paid work and were available for work and either:
(a) had actively looked for work in the past four weeks; or
(b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or
(c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Not in Labour Force
Refers to those persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes persons who did not work for pay or in self-employment in the week prior to enumeration and (a) did not look for paid work in the four weeks prior to enumeration, (b) were not on temporary lay-off and (c) did not have a new job to start in four weeks or less. It also includes persons who looked for work during the last four weeks but were not available to start work in the week prior to enumeration.

Total Labour Force (in Reference Week)
Refers to all persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day.

Participation Rate
Refers to the total labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population in that group.

Employment-population Ratio
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The employment-population ratio for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over in that group.

Unemployment Rate
Refers to the unemployed labour force expressed as a percentage of the total labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the total labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Note:
The components of Population and Labour Force Activity are illustrated in Figure 9 of the 1996 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-351-XPE.

For information on the comparability of Labour Force Activity with those of previous censuses and with the Labour Force Survey, see Appendix E of the 1996 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-351-XPE.

Return to footnote 138 referrer

Footnote 139

Age
Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 14, 1996). This variable is derived from date of birth.


Sex
Refers to the gender of the respondent.


Labour Market Activities: Labour Force Activity
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Respondents were classified as either employed, unemployed or not in the labour force.

Employed
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day:
(a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment; or
(b) were absent from their job or business for the entire week because of vacation, illness, a labour dispute at their place of work or other reasons.

Unemployed
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, were without paid work and were available for work and either:
(a) had actively looked for work in the past four weeks; or
(b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or
(c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Not in Labour Force
Refers to those persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes persons who did not work for pay or in self-employment in the week prior to enumeration and (a) did not look for paid work in the four weeks prior to enumeration, (b) were not on temporary lay-off and (c) did not have a new job to start in four weeks or less. It also includes persons who looked for work during the last four weeks but were not available to start work in the week prior to enumeration.

Total Labour Force (in Reference Week)
Refers to all persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day.

Participation Rate
Refers to the total labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population in that group.

Employment-population Ratio
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The employment-population ratio for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over in that group.

Unemployment Rate
Refers to the unemployed labour force expressed as a percentage of the total labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the total labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Note:
The components of Population and Labour Force Activity are illustrated in Figure 9 of the 1996 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-351-XPE.

For information on the comparability of Labour Force Activity with those of previous censuses and with the Labour Force Survey, see Appendix E of the 1996 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-351-XPE.

Return to footnote 139 referrer

Footnote 140

Household, Private:
Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.


Labour Market Activities: Presence of Children
This variable classifies the population 15 years of age and over in private households into those with no children at home and those with children at home. Those persons with children at home are further classified on the basis of the age groups of all of their children.

This variable is based on census family concept. It is derived specifically for the purposes of analysis and dissemination of census labour force activity data.

The term 'children' is also referred to as 'never-married sons and/or daughters' in the census. It includes all blood, step- or adopted sons and daughters who have never married, regardless of age, in census families (in private households), who are living in the same dwelling as their parent(s). Sons and daughters who are currently or were previously married, or who are living common-law, are not considered to be members of their parent(s)' census family, even if they are living in the same dwelling.


Labour Market Activities: Labour Force Activity
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Respondents were classified as either employed, unemployed or not in the labour force.

Employed
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day:
(a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment; or
(b) were absent from their job or business for the entire week because of vacation, illness, a labour dispute at their place of work or other reasons.

Unemployed
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, were without paid work and were available for work and either:
(a) had actively looked for work in the past four weeks; or
(b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or
(c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Not in Labour Force
Refers to those persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes persons who did not work for pay or in self-employment in the week prior to enumeration and (a) did not look for paid work in the four weeks prior to enumeration, (b) were not on temporary lay-off and (c) did not have a new job to start in four weeks or less. It also includes persons who looked for work during the last four weeks but were not available to start work in the week prior to enumeration.

Total Labour Force (in Reference Week)
Refers to all persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day.

Participation Rate
Refers to the total labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population in that group.

Employment-population Ratio
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The employment-population ratio for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over in that group.

Unemployment Rate
Refers to the unemployed labour force expressed as a percentage of the total labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the total labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Note:
The components of Population and Labour Force Activity are illustrated in Figure 9 of the 1996 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-351-XPE.

For information on the comparability of Labour Force Activity with those of previous censuses and with the Labour Force Survey, see Appendix E of the 1996 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-351-XPE.

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Footnote 141

Sex
Refers to the gender of the respondent.


Household, Private:
Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.


Labour Market Activities: Presence of Children
This variable classifies the population 15 years of age and over in private households into those with no children at home and those with children at home. Those persons with children at home are further classified on the basis of the age groups of all of their children.

This variable is based on census family concept. It is derived specifically for the purposes of analysis and dissemination of census labour force activity data.

The term 'children' is also referred to as 'never-married sons and/or daughters' in the census. It includes all blood, step- or adopted sons and daughters who have never married, regardless of age, in census families (in private households), who are living in the same dwelling as their parent(s). Sons and daughters who are currently or were previously married, or who are living common-law, are not considered to be members of their parent(s)' census family, even if they are living in the same dwelling.


Labour Market Activities: Labour Force Activity
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Respondents were classified as either employed, unemployed or not in the labour force.

Employed
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day:
(a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment; or
(b) were absent from their job or business for the entire week because of vacation, illness, a labour dispute at their place of work or other reasons.

Unemployed
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, were without paid work and were available for work and either:
(a) had actively looked for work in the past four weeks; or
(b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or
(c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Not in Labour Force
Refers to those persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes persons who did not work for pay or in self-employment in the week prior to enumeration and (a) did not look for paid work in the four weeks prior to enumeration, (b) were not on temporary lay-off and (c) did not have a new job to start in four weeks or less. It also includes persons who looked for work during the last four weeks but were not available to start work in the week prior to enumeration.

Total Labour Force (in Reference Week)
Refers to all persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day.

Participation Rate
Refers to the total labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population in that group.

Employment-population Ratio
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The employment-population ratio for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over in that group.

Unemployment Rate
Refers to the unemployed labour force expressed as a percentage of the total labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the total labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Note:
The components of Population and Labour Force Activity are illustrated in Figure 9 of the 1996 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-351-XPE.

For information on the comparability of Labour Force Activity with those of previous censuses and with the Labour Force Survey, see Appendix E of the 1996 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-351-XPE.

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Footnote 142

Sex
Refers to the gender of the respondent.


Household, Private:
Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.


Labour Market Activities: Presence of Children
This variable classifies the population 15 years of age and over in private households into those with no children at home and those with children at home. Those persons with children at home are further classified on the basis of the age groups of all of their children.

This variable is based on census family concept. It is derived specifically for the purposes of analysis and dissemination of census labour force activity data.

The term 'children' is also referred to as 'never-married sons and/or daughters' in the census. It includes all blood, step- or adopted sons and daughters who have never married, regardless of age, in census families (in private households), who are living in the same dwelling as their parent(s). Sons and daughters who are currently or were previously married, or who are living common-law, are not considered to be members of their parent(s)' census family, even if they are living in the same dwelling.


Labour Market Activities: Labour Force Activity
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Respondents were classified as either employed, unemployed or not in the labour force.

Employed
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day:
(a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment; or
(b) were absent from their job or business for the entire week because of vacation, illness, a labour dispute at their place of work or other reasons.

Unemployed
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, were without paid work and were available for work and either:
(a) had actively looked for work in the past four weeks; or
(b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or
(c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Not in Labour Force
Refers to those persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes persons who did not work for pay or in self-employment in the week prior to enumeration and (a) did not look for paid work in the four weeks prior to enumeration, (b) were not on temporary lay-off and (c) did not have a new job to start in four weeks or less. It also includes persons who looked for work during the last four weeks but were not available to start work in the week prior to enumeration.

Total Labour Force (in Reference Week)
Refers to all persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day.

Participation Rate
Refers to the total labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population in that group.

Employment-population Ratio
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The employment-population ratio for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over in that group.

Unemployment Rate
Refers to the unemployed labour force expressed as a percentage of the total labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the total labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Note:
The components of Population and Labour Force Activity are illustrated in Figure 9 of the 1996 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-351-XPE.

For information on the comparability of Labour Force Activity with those of previous censuses and with the Labour Force Survey, see Appendix E of the 1996 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-351-XPE.

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Footnote 143

Labour Market Activities: Industry (Based on 1980 Standard Industrial Classification)
Refers to the general nature of the business carried out in the establishment where the person worked, as indicated by the name of the employer and the kind of business, industry or service. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. If the person did not have a job during the week prior to enumeration, data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 1995. Persons with two or more jobs were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

The 1996 industry data are produced according to the 1980 Standard Industrial Classification. This classification consists of a systematic and comprehensive arrangement of industries structured into 18 divisions, 75 major groups and 296 groups. These industrial groups are based on the general nature of the establishment's business, industry or service. For further information on the classification, see the Standard Industrial Classification, 1980, Catalogue No. 12-501E.


Labour Market Activities: Total Labour Force (in Reference Week)
Refers to all persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day.

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Footnote 144

Unemployed persons 15 years of age and over who have never worked for pay or profit or who had worked only prior to January 1st of the previous year.

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Footnote 145

This category is also referred to as the 'Experienced Labour Force'.


Labour Market Activities: Experienced Labour Force
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, and who had last worked for pay or in self-employment in either 1995 or in 1996. The experienced labour force can be derived by excluding from the total labour force those unemployed persons 15 years of age and over who have never worked or who had last worked prior to January 1, 1995 only.

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Footnote 146

View the 'Industry Data Quality Notes' by choosing 'Summary' from the 'File' menu.

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Footnote 147

View the 'Industry Data Quality Notes' by choosing 'Summary' from the 'File' menu.

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Footnote 148

View the 'Industry Data Quality Notes' by choosing 'Summary' from the 'File' menu.

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Footnote 149

Labour Market Activities: Occupation (Based on 1991 Standard Occupational Classification)
Refers to the kind of work persons were doing during the reference week, as determined by their kind of work and the description of the most important duties in their job. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. If the person did not have a job during the week prior to enumeration, the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 1995. Persons with two or more jobs were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.


Labour Market Activities: Total Labour Force (in Reference Week)
Refers to all persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day.


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Footnote 150

Unemployed persons 15 years of age and over who have never worked for pay or profit or who had worked only prior to January 1st of the previous year.

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Footnote 151

This category is also referred to as the 'Experienced Labour Force'.


Labour Market Activities: Experienced Labour Force
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, and who had last worked for pay or in self-employment in either 1995 or in 1996. The experienced labour force can be derived by excluding from the total labour force those unemployed persons 15 years of age and over who have never worked or who had last worked prior to January 1, 1995 only.

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Footnote 152

Labour Market Activities: Occupation (Based on 1991 Standard Occupational Classification)
Refers to the kind of work persons were doing during the reference week, as determined by their kind of work and the description of the most important duties in their job. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. If the person did not have a job during the week prior to enumeration, the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 1995. Persons with two or more jobs were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

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Footnote 153

Unemployed persons 15 years of age and over who have never worked for pay or profit or who had worked only prior to January 1st of the previous year.

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Footnote 154

This category is also referred to as the 'Experienced Labour Force'.


Labour Market Activities: Experienced Labour Force
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, and who had last worked for pay or in self-employment in either 1995 or in 1996. The experienced labour force can be derived by excluding from the total labour force those unemployed persons 15 years of age and over who have never worked or who had last worked prior to January 1, 1995 only.

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Footnote 155

Labour Market Activities: Occupation (Based on 1991 Standard Occupational Classification)
Refers to the kind of work persons were doing during the reference week, as determined by their kind of work and the description of the most important duties in their job. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. If the person did not have a job during the week prior to enumeration, the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 1995. Persons with two or more jobs were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

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Footnote 156

Unemployed persons 15 years of age and over who have never worked for pay or profit or who had worked only prior to January 1st of the previous year.

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Footnote 157

This category is also referred to as the 'Experienced Labour Force'.


Labour Market Activities: Experienced Labour Force
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, and who had last worked for pay or in self-employment in either 1995 or in 1996. The experienced labour force can be derived by excluding from the total labour force those unemployed persons 15 years of age and over who have never worked or who had last worked prior to January 1, 1995 only.

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Footnote 158

Labour Market Activities: Class of Worker
This variable classifies persons who reported a job into those who (a) worked mainly for wages, salaries, commissions or payments 'in kind' (payments in goods or services rather than money), (b) worked without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice owned or operated by a related household member, (c) worked mainly for themselves, with or without paid help. The job reported was the one held in the week prior to enumeration if the person was employed, or the job of longest duration since January 1, 1995, if the person was not employed during the reference week. Persons with two or more jobs in the reference week were to provide information for the job at which they worked the most hours. Incorporation status refers to the legal status of a business or farm. An incorporated business is a business or farm which has been formed into a legal corporation, having a legal entity under either federal or provincial laws.


Labour Market Activities: Total Labour Force (in Reference Week)
Refers to all persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day.

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Footnote 159

Unemployed persons 15 years of age and over who have never worked for pay or profit or who had worked only prior to January 1st of the previous year.

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Footnote 160

This category is also referred to as the 'Experienced Labour Force'.


Labour Market Activities: Experienced Labour Force
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, and who had last worked for pay or in self-employment in either 1995 or in 1996. The experienced labour force can be derived by excluding from the total labour force those unemployed persons 15 years of age and over who have never worked or who had last worked prior to January 1, 1995 only.

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Footnote 161

Labour Market Activities: Class of Worker
This variable classifies persons who reported a job into those who (a) worked mainly for wages, salaries, commissions or payments 'in kind' (payments in goods or services rather than money), (b) worked without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice owned or operated by a related household member, (c) worked mainly for themselves, with or without paid help. The job reported was the one held in the week prior to enumeration if the person was employed, or the job of longest duration since January 1, 1995, if the person was not employed during the reference week. Persons with two or more jobs in the reference week were to provide information for the job at which they worked the most hours. Incorporation status refers to the legal status of a business or farm. An incorporated business is a business or farm which has been formed into a legal corporation, having a legal entity under either federal or provincial laws.

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Footnote 162

Unemployed persons 15 years of age and over who have never worked for pay or profit or who had worked only prior to January 1st of the previous year.

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Footnote 163

This category is also referred to as the 'Experienced Labour Force'.


Labour Market Activities: Experienced Labour Force
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, and who had last worked for pay or in self-employment in either 1995 or in 1996. The experienced labour force can be derived by excluding from the total labour force those unemployed persons 15 years of age and over who have never worked or who had last worked prior to January 1, 1995 only.

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Footnote 164

Labour Market Activities: Class of Worker
This variable classifies persons who reported a job into those who (a) worked mainly for wages, salaries, commissions or payments 'in kind' (payments in goods or services rather than money), (b) worked without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice owned or operated by a related household member, (c) worked mainly for themselves, with or without paid help. The job reported was the one held in the week prior to enumeration if the person was employed, or the job of longest duration since January 1, 1995, if the person was not employed during the reference week. Persons with two or more jobs in the reference week were to provide information for the job at which they worked the most hours. Incorporation status refers to the legal status of a business or farm. An incorporated business is a business or farm which has been formed into a legal corporation, having a legal entity under either federal or provincial laws.

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Footnote 165

Unemployed persons 15 years of age and over who have never worked for pay or profit or who had worked only prior to January 1st of the previous year.

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Footnote 166

This category is also referred to as the 'Experienced Labour Force'.


Labour Market Activities: Experienced Labour Force
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, and who had last worked for pay or in self-employment in either 1995 or in 1996. The experienced labour force can be derived by excluding from the total labour force those unemployed persons 15 years of age and over who have never worked or who had last worked prior to January 1, 1995 only.

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Footnote 167

Household Activities: Hours Spent Doing Unpaid Housework
Refers to the number of hours persons spent doing unpaid housework, yard work or home maintenance in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. It includes hours spent doing housework for one's own household or the household of others. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents.

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Footnote 168

Household Activities: Hours Spent Doing Unpaid Housework
Refers to the number of hours persons spent doing unpaid housework, yard work or home maintenance in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. It includes hours spent doing housework for one's own household or the household of others. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents.

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Footnote 169

Household Activities: Hours Spent Doing Unpaid Housework
Refers to the number of hours persons spent doing unpaid housework, yard work or home maintenance in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. It includes hours spent doing housework for one's own household or the household of others. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents.

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Footnote 170

Household Activities: Hours Spent Looking After Children, Without Pay
Refers to the number of hours persons spent taking care of their own or someone else's children without pay in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents.


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Footnote 171

Household Activities: Hours Spent Looking After Children, Without Pay
Refers to the number of hours persons spent taking care of their own or someone else's children without pay in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents.


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Footnote 172

Household Activities: Hours Spent Looking After Children, Without Pay
Refers to the number of hours persons spent taking care of their own or someone else's children without pay in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents.


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Footnote 173

Household Activities: Hours Spent Providing Unpaid Care or Assistance to Seniors
Refers to the number of hours persons spent providing unpaid care or assistance to seniors in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents.

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Footnote 174

Household Activities: Hours Spent Providing Unpaid Care or Assistance to Seniors
Refers to the number of hours persons spent providing unpaid care or assistance to seniors in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents.

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Footnote 175

Household Activities: Hours Spent Providing Unpaid Care or Assistance to Seniors
Refers to the number of hours persons spent providing unpaid care or assistance to seniors in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents.

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Footnote 176

Labour Market Activities: Employed
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day:

(a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment; or
(b) were absent from their job or business for the entire week because of vacation, illness, a labour dispute at their place of work or other reasons.


Journey to Work: Place of Work Status
Refers to the place of work of non-institutional residents 15 years of age and over who have worked since January 1, 1995. The variable usually relates to the individual's job held in the week prior to enumeration. However, if the person had not worked during that week but had worked at some time since January 1, 1995, the information relates to the job held longest during that period.

Supplementary Definition:
Worked at home - Persons whose job is located in the same building as their place of residence, persons who live and work on the same farm, and teleworkers who spend most of their work week working at home.

Worked outside Canada - Persons who work as diplomats, Armed Forces personnel and other persons enumerated abroad. Includes also recent immigrants who may not currently be employed but whose job of longest duration since January 1, 1995 was held outside Canada.

No fixed workplace address - Persons who do not go from home to the same workplace location at the beginning of each shift. Such persons include building and landscape contractors, travelling salespersons, independent truck drivers, etc.

Worked at the address specified below - Persons who are not included in the categories described above and who report to the same (usual) workplace location at the beginning of each shift are included here. Respondents were asked to provide the street address, city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve, province/territory and postal code of their workplace. If the full street address was not known, the name of the building or nearest street intersection could be substituted.

Teleworkers who spend less than one-half of their work week working at their home office were asked to report the full address of their employer. Persons whose actual workplace location varied but who reported regularly to an employer's headquarters at the beginning of each shift were asked to report the full address of the headquarters.

For more information on the comparability of place of work status with previous censuses, please refer to the appendix on Historical Comparability of Journey to Work Data in the electronic documentation supplied with this product.


Note on Comparability of 1996 Place of Work Data:
Working at home can be measured in different ways. In the Census, the 'worked at home' category includes persons who live and work at the same physical location, such as farmers, teleworkers and work camp workers. In addition, the 1996 Census Guide instructed persons who worked part of the time at home and part of the time at an employer's address to indicate that they worked at home if most of their time was spent working at home (e.g. 3 days out of 5).

The 1995 Survey of Work Arrangements asked respondents whether they did some or all of their paid work at home. The difference between the 1996 Census and the 1995 Survey of Work Arrangements work at home data is the result of differences in the way these workers are measured.

The place of work question has been asked in virtually the same format in each census since 1971. However, the term 'no fixed workplace address' replaced 'no usual place of work' in 1996. For 1996, the Census questionnaire was modified by adding a check box for the 'no fixed workplace address' response category. In previous censuses, respondents were asked to write 'no usual place of work' in the address fields. It is believed that previous censuses have undercounted the number of persons with 'no fixed workplace address'.

Annexations, incorporations and amalgamations of municipalities could create some difficulties when comparing spatial units and structures which change over time.

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Footnote 177

Labour Market Activities: Employed
Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day:

(a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment; or
(b) were absent from their job or business for the entire week because of vacation, illness, a labour dispute at their place of work or other reasons.


Journey to Work: Mode of Transportation
Refers to the mode of transportation to work of non-institutional residents 15 years of age and over who have worked since January 1, 1995. Persons who indicated in the place of work question that they either had no fixed workplace address, or specified a usual place of work address, were asked to identify the mode of transportation they most frequently used to commute between home and work. The variable usually relates to the individual's job in the week prior to enumeration. However, if the person had not worked during that week but had worked at some time since January 1, 1995, the information relates to the job held longest during that period.

Supplementary Definition:
Persons who use more than one mode of transportation were asked to identify the single mode they used for most of the travel distance. As a result, the question provides data on the primary mode of transportation to work. It does not measure multiple modes of transportation, nor does it measure seasonal variation in mode of transportation or trips made for purposes other than the commute between home and work.


Note on Comparability of 1996 Place of Work Data:
The place of work question has been asked in virtually the same format in each census since 1971. However, the term 'no fixed workplace' replaced 'no usual place of work' in 1996. For 1996, the Census questionnaire was modified by adding a check box for the 'no fixed workplace' response category. In previous censuses, respondents were asked to write 'no usual place of work' in the address fields. It is believed that previous censuses have undercounted the number of persons with 'no fixed workplace'.

Annexations, incorporations and amalgamations of municipalities could create some difficulties when comparing spatial units and structures which change over time.

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Footnote 178

Schooling: School Attendance

Refers to either full-time or part-time (day or evening) attendance at school, college or university during the eight-month period between September 1995 and May 14, 1996. Attendance is counted only for courses which could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

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Footnote 179

Schooling: Highest Level of

Refers to the highest grade or year of elementary or secondary school attended, or the highest year of university or other non-university completed. University education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than other non-university. Also, the attainment of a degree, certificate or diploma is considered to be at a higher level than years completed or attended without an educational qualification.


Note on Data Quality for Highest Level of Schooling:

The overall quality of the education variables from the 1996 Census is acceptable. However, a specific data problem has been identified. There is an inconsistency in the 'Highest Grade of Elementary-secondary' variable in the province of Quebec. The proportion of persons with the value of 'No schooling or kindergarten only' has increased from 0.8% (44,440) in 1991 to 1.2% (72,070) in 1996. The problem appears to be the wording of Question 24 on the French 2B Census questionnaire. The 'Highest Level of Schooling' and 'Total Years of Schooling' variables are also affected as they are derived from a number of education questions including 'Highest Grade of Elementary-secondary'.

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Footnote 180

Includes 'Never attended school or attended kindergarten only'.

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Footnote 181

Refers to courses completed at postsecondary institutions which normally require a secondary school graduation certificate or equivalent for entrance, as well as to other courses in related or like institutions which may not require a secondary school graduation certificate for entrance.

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Footnote 182

Includes trades certificate or diploma, other non-university certificate or diploma and university certificate or diploma below bachelor level.

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Footnote 183

Includes trades certificate or diploma, other non-university certificate or diploma and university certificate or diploma below bachelor level.

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Footnote 184

Schooling: Major Field of Study (MFS)

Refers to the predominant discipline or area of learning or training of a person's highest postsecondary degree, certificate or diploma. The major field of study classification structure consists of 10 broad or major categories: educational, recreational and counselling services; fine and applied arts; humanities and related fields; social sciences and related fields; commerce, management and business administration; agricultural and biological sciences/technologies; engineering and applied sciences; engineering and applied science technologies and trades; health professions, sciences and technologies; and mathematics and physical sciences. This structure is, in turn, subdivided into over 100 'minor' classification categories and about 425 'unit' groups.

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Footnote 185

Schooling: Major Field of Study (MFS)

Refers to the predominant discipline or area of learning or training of a person's highest postsecondary degree, certificate or diploma. The major field of study classification structure consists of 10 broad or major categories: educational, recreational and counselling services; fine and applied arts; humanities and related fields; social sciences and related fields; commerce, management and business administration; agricultural and biological sciences/technologies; engineering and applied sciences; engineering and applied science technologies and trades; health professions, sciences and technologies; and mathematics and physical sciences. This structure is, in turn, subdivided into over 100 'minor' classification categories and about 425 'unit' groups.

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Footnote 186

Mobility 1: Mobility Status - Place of Residence 1 Year Ago

Refers to the relationship between a person's usual place of residence on Census Day and his or her usual place of residence one year earlier. A person is classified as a non-mover if no difference exists. Otherwise, a person is classed as a mover and this categorization is called Mobility Status (1 Year Ago). Within the category movers, a further distinction is made between non-migrants and migrants; this difference is called migration status.

Non-movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at the same address which they occupied one year earlier.

Movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at a different address than the one at which they resided one year earlier.

Non-migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living at a different address but in the same census subdivision (CSD) that they occupied one year earlier.

Migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were residing in a different CSD one year earlier (internal migrants) or who were living outside Canada one year earlier (external migrants).

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Footnote 187

Mobility 5: Mobility Status - Place of Residence 5 Years Ago

Refers to the relationship between a person's usual place of residence on Census Day and his or her usual place of residence five years earlier. A person is classified as a non-mover if no difference exists. Otherwise, a person is classed as a mover and this categorization is called Mobility Status (5 Years Ago). Within the category movers, a further distinction is made between non-migrants and migrants; this difference is called migration status.

Non-movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at the same address which they occupied five years earlier.

Movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at a different address than the one at which they resided five years earlier.

Non-migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living at a different address but in the same census subdivision (CSD) that they occupied five years earlier.

Migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were residing in a different CSD five years earlier (internal migrants) or who were living outside Canada five years earlier (external migrants).

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Footnote 188

Includes persons who did not work in 1995 but reported employment income.


Income: Employment Income/Earnings

Refers to total income received by persons 15 years of age and over during 1995 as:

Wages and Salaries

Refers to gross wages and salaries before deductions for such items as income tax, pensions and unemployment insurance. Included in this source are military pay and allowances, tips, commissions and cash bonuses, as well as all types of casual earnings during calendar year 1995. The value of taxable allowances and benefits provided by employers, such as free lodging and free automobile use, is excluded.

Net Non-farm Income from Unincorporated Business and/or Professional Practice

Refers to net income (gross receipts minus expenses of operation such as wages, rents and depreciation) received during calendar year 1995 from the respondent's non-farm unincorporated business or professional practice. In the case of partnerships, only the respondent's share was reported. Also included is net income of persons babysitting in their own homes, self-employed fishermen, hunters and trappers, operators of direct distributorships such as those selling and delivering cosmetics, as well as from freelance activities of artists, writers, music teachers, hairdressers, dressmakers, etc.

Net Farm Income

Refers to net income (gross receipts from farm sales minus depreciation and cost of operation) received during calendar year 1995 from the operation of a farm, either on own account or in partnership. In the case of partnerships, only the respondent's share of income was reported. Also included are cash advances, dividends from cooperatives, gross insurance proceeds and all rebates and farm-support payments to farmers from federal, provincial and regional agricultural programs (e.g., milk subsidies and marketing board payments). However, the value of income 'in kind', such as agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm, is excluded.

Supplementary definition:

Average Income of Individuals

Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

This concept and procedure applies to total income, employment income, wages and salaries and any other component of income.

Median Income of Individuals

The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e. the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median.

This concept and procedure applies to total income, employment income, wages and salaries and any other component of income.

Standard Error of Average Income

Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be approximately two and a half standard errors.


Sex

Refers to the gender of the respondent.


Labour Market Activities: Work Activity in 1995 (Derived)

Refers to the number of weeks in which a person worked for pay or in self-employment in 1995 at all jobs held, even if only for a few hours, and whether these weeks were mostly full time (30 hours or more per week) or mostly part time (less than 30 hours per week). Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents.

Weeks worked in the reference year include weeks of paid vacation, weeks on sick leave with pay and all weeks in which training was paid for by the employer. Persons who worked less than a year but who were paid on a twelve-month basis, such as school teachers, were instructed to report 52 weeks. Persons who operated a farm, business or professional practice for the full year, including weeks of vacation, were also instructed to report 52 weeks.

The term 'full-year full-time workers' refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who worked 49-52 weeks on a full time basis in the reference year for pay or in self-employment.

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Footnote 189

Worked 49-52 weeks in 1995, mostly full time.

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Footnote 190

Worked 49-52 weeks in 1995, mostly part time, or worked 1-49 weeks.

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Footnote 191

Includes persons who did not work in 1995 but reported employment income.

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Footnote 192

Worked 49-52 weeks in 1995, mostly full time.

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Footnote 193

Worked 49-52 weeks in 1995, mostly part time, or worked 1-49 weeks.

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Footnote 194

Includes persons who did not work in 1995 but reported employment income.

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Footnote 195

Worked 49-52 weeks in 1995, mostly full time.

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Footnote 196

Worked 49-52 weeks in 1995, mostly part time, or worked 1-49 weeks.

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Footnote 197

Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding of the data.


Income: Composition of Income

The composition of the total income of a population group or a geographic area refers to the relative share of each income source or group of sources, expressed as a percentage of the aggregate total income of that group or area.

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Footnote 198

Income: Total Income

Refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 1995 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total);
- net farm income;
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice;
- federal Child Tax benefits;
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement;
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan;
- benefits from Unemployment Insurance;
- other income from government sources;
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income;
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs;
- other money income.

Receipts Not Counted as Income

Gambling gains and losses, money inherited during the year, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property or personal belongings, income tax refunds, loans received, loans repaid to an individual as the lender, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates of property taxes and other taxes, and refunds of pension contributions were excluded as was all income 'in kind' such as free meals, living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average Income of Individuals

Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

This concept and procedure applies to total income, employment income, wages and salaries and any other component of income.

Median Income of Individuals

The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e. the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median.

This concept and procedure applies to total income, employment income, wages and salaries and any other component of income.

Standard Error of Average Income

Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be approximately two and a half standard errors.


Sex

Refers to the gender of the respondent.

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Footnote 199

Including loss.

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Footnote 200

For persons with income.

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Footnote 201

For persons with income.

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Footnote 202

For persons with income.

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Footnote 203

Including loss.

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Footnote 204

For persons with income.

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Footnote 205

For persons with income.

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Footnote 206

For persons with income.

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Footnote 207

Including loss.

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Footnote 208

For persons with income.

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Footnote 209

For persons with income.

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Footnote 210

For persons with income.

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Footnote 211

Includes male and female lone-parent families.


Income: Census Family Total Income

The total income of a census family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.

Total Income

Refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 1995 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total);
- net farm income;
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice;
- federal Child Tax benefits;
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement;
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan;
- benefits from Unemployment Insurance;
- other income from government sources;
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income;
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs;
- other money income.

Receipts Not Counted as Income

Gambling gains and losses, money inherited during the year, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property or personal belongings, income tax refunds, loans received, loans repaid to an individual as the lender, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates of property taxes and other taxes, and refunds of pension contributions were excluded as was all income 'in kind' such as free meals, living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average Income of Census Families and Non-family Persons 15 Years of Age and Over

Average census family income refers to the weighted mean total income of census families.

Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (e.g., husband-wife families with working wives) by the number of families in that group, whether or not they reported income. Similarly, the average income of a group of non-family persons is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of the specified group by the number of all non-family persons 15 years of age and over in the group, whether or not they reported income.

Median Income of Census Families and Non-family Persons 15 Years of Age and Over

The median income of a specified group of census families or non-family persons 15 years of age and over is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e. the incomes of the first half of the families or non-family persons are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median.

The median income of census families and non-family persons is calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard Error of Average Income

Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be approximately two and a half standard errors.


Census Family Structure

Refers to the classification of census families into families of now-married couples (with or without never-married sons or daughters of either or both spouses), families of common-law couples (with or without never-married sons or daughters of either or both partners) and lone-parent families by sex of parent.

Supplementary definition:

Families of now-married couples and those of common-law couples together constitute 'husband-wife families'.

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Footnote 212

Including loss.

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Footnote 213

Income: Census Family Total Income

The total income of a census family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.

Total Income

Refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 1995 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total);
- net farm income;
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice;
- federal Child Tax benefits;
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement;
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan;
- benefits from Unemployment Insurance;
- other income from government sources;
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income;
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs;
- other money income.

Receipts Not Counted as Income

Gambling gains and losses, money inherited during the year, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property or personal belongings, income tax refunds, loans received, loans repaid to an individual as the lender, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates of property taxes and other taxes, and refunds of pension contributions were excluded as was all income 'in kind' such as free meals, living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average Income of Census Families and Non-family Persons 15 Years of Age and Over

Average census family income refers to the weighted mean total income of census families.

Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (e.g., husband-wife families with working wives) by the number of families in that group, whether or not they reported income. Similarly, the average income of a group of non-family persons is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of the specified group by the number of all non-family persons 15 years of age and over in the group, whether or not they reported income.

Median Income of Census Families and Non-family Persons 15 Years of Age and Over

The median income of a specified group of census families or non-family persons 15 years of age and over is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e. the incomes of the first half of the families or non-family persons are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median.

The median income of census families and non-family persons is calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard Error of Average Income

Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be approximately two and a half standard errors.


Census Family Structure

Refers to the classification of census families into families of now-married couples (with or without never-married sons or daughters of either or both spouses), families of common-law couples (with or without never-married sons or daughters of either or both partners) and lone-parent families by sex of parent.

Supplementary definition:

Families of now-married couples and those of common-law couples together constitute 'husband-wife families'.

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Footnote 214

Including loss.

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Footnote 215

Census Family Structure

Refers to the classification of census families into families of now-married couples (with or without never-married sons or daughters of either or both spouses), families of common-law couples (with or without never-married sons or daughters of either or both partners) and lone-parent families by sex of parent.

Supplementary definition:

Families of now-married couples and those of common-law couples together constitute 'husband-wife families'.


Income: Census Family Total Income

The total income of a census family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.

Total Income

Refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 1995 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total);
- net farm income;
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice;
- federal Child Tax benefits;
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement;
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan;
- benefits from Unemployment Insurance;
- other income from government sources;
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income;
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs;
- other money income.

Receipts Not Counted as Income

Gambling gains and losses, money inherited during the year, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property or personal belongings, income tax refunds, loans received, loans repaid to an individual as the lender, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates of property taxes and other taxes, and refunds of pension contributions were excluded as was all income 'in kind' such as free meals, living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average Income of Census Families and Non-family Persons 15 Years of Age and Over

Average census family income refers to the weighted mean total income of census families.

Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (e.g., husband-wife families with working wives) by the number of families in that group, whether or not they reported income. Similarly, the average income of a group of non-family persons is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of the specified group by the number of all non-family persons 15 years of age and over in the group, whether or not they reported income.

Median Income of Census Families and Non-family Persons 15 Years of Age and Over

The median income of a specified group of census families or non-family persons 15 years of age and over is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e. the incomes of the first half of the families or non-family persons are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median.

The median income of census families and non-family persons is calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard Error of Average Income

Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be approximately two and a half standard errors.

Return to footnote 215 referrer

Footnote 216

Income: Census Family Total Income

The total income of a census family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.

Total Income

Refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 1995 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total);
- net farm income;
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice;
- federal Child Tax benefits;
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement;
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan;
- benefits from Unemployment Insurance;
- other income from government sources;
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income;
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs;
- other money income.

Receipts Not Counted as Income

Gambling gains and losses, money inherited during the year, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property or personal belongings, income tax refunds, loans received, loans repaid to an individual as the lender, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates of property taxes and other taxes, and refunds of pension contributions were excluded as was all income 'in kind' such as free meals, living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average Income of Census Families and Non-family Persons 15 Years of Age and Over

Average census family income refers to the weighted mean total income of census families.

Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (e.g., husband-wife families with working wives) by the number of families in that group, whether or not they reported income. Similarly, the average income of a group of non-family persons is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of the specified group by the number of all non-family persons 15 years of age and over in the group, whether or not they reported income.

Median Income of Census Families and Non-family Persons 15 Years of Age and Over

The median income of a specified group of census families or non-family persons 15 years of age and over is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e. the incomes of the first half of the families or non-family persons are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median.

The median income of census families and non-family persons is calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard Error of Average Income

Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be approximately two and a half standard errors.


Census Family Status

Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not they are members of a census family.

Family persons refers to household members who belong to a census family

Non-family persons refers to household members who do not belong to a census family. They may be related to Person 1, the household reference person (e.g., Person 1's divorced brother, brother-in-law, cousin, grandparent), or unrelated (e.g., lodger, room-mate, employee). A person living alone is always a non-family person.


Sex

Refers to the gender of the respondent.


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Footnote 217

Including loss.

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Footnote 218

Including loss.

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Footnote 219

Including loss.

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Footnote 220

Economic Family

Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

Supplementary definition:

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either male or female spouse, male or female common-law partner or never-married son or daughter with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example: a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons.

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Footnote 221

Income: Incidence of Low Income

The incidence of low income is the proportion or percentage of economic families or unattached individuals in a given classification below the low income cut-offs. These incidence rates are calculated from unrounded estimates of economic families and unattached individuals 15 years of age and over. Since all members of an economic family share a common status, incidence of low income can also be calculated for the population in private households.

Income Status

Refers to the position of an economic family or an unattached individual 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income cut-offs (LICOs).

Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs)

Measures of low income known as low income cut-offs (LICOs) were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. These data indicated that Canadian families spent, on average, 42% in 1969, 38.5% in 1978, 36.2% in 1986 and 34.7% in 1992 of their income on basic necessities. By adding the original difference of 20 percentage points to the basic level of expenditure on necessities, new low income cut-offs were set at income levels differentiated by family size and degree of urbanization. Since then, these cut-offs have been updated yearly by changes in the consumer price index.

Note: For more information on Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs) and for the 1990 and 1995 matrices of Low Income Cut-offs, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product. c:\Rec96cen\Document\English\Other\Specnotes.txt

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Footnote 222

Unattached Individual

Refers to a household member who is not a member of an economic family. Unattached individuals may either live alone or in a household where they are not related to any other member of that household. Income statistics are produced for unattached individuals who are at least 15 years of age.

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Footnote 223

Income: Incidence of Low Income

The incidence of low income is the proportion or percentage of economic families or unattached individuals in a given classification below the low income cut-offs. These incidence rates are calculated from unrounded estimates of economic families and unattached individuals 15 years of age and over. Since all members of an economic family share a common status, incidence of low income can also be calculated for the population in private households.

Income Status

Refers to the position of an economic family or an unattached individual 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income cut-offs (LICOs).

Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs)

Measures of low income known as low income cut-offs (LICOs) were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. These data indicated that Canadian families spent, on average, 42% in 1969, 38.5% in 1978, 36.2% in 1986 and 34.7% in 1992 of their income on basic necessities. By adding the original difference of 20 percentage points to the basic level of expenditure on necessities, new low income cut-offs were set at income levels differentiated by family size and degree of urbanization. Since then, these cut-offs have been updated yearly by changes in the consumer price index.

Note: For more information on Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs) and for the 1990 and 1995 matrices of Low Income Cut-offs, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product. c:\Rec96cen\Document\English\Other\Specnotes.txt

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Footnote 224

Household, Private

Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.

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Footnote 225

Income: Incidence of Low Income

The incidence of low income is the proportion or percentage of economic families or unattached individuals in a given classification below the low income cut-offs. These incidence rates are calculated from unrounded estimates of economic families and unattached individuals 15 years of age and over. Since all members of an economic family share a common status, incidence of low income can also be calculated for the population in private households.

Income Status

Refers to the position of an economic family or an unattached individual 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income cut-offs (LICOs).

Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs)

Measures of low income known as low income cut-offs (LICOs) were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. These data indicated that Canadian families spent, on average, 42% in 1969, 38.5% in 1978, 36.2% in 1986 and 34.7% in 1992 of their income on basic necessities. By adding the original difference of 20 percentage points to the basic level of expenditure on necessities, new low income cut-offs were set at income levels differentiated by family size and degree of urbanization. Since then, these cut-offs have been updated yearly by changes in the consumer price index.

Note: For more information on Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs) and for the 1990 and 1995 matrices of Low Income Cut-offs, please refer to the electronic documentation supplied with this product. c:\Rec96cen\Document\English\Other\Specnotes.txt

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Footnote 226

Income: Household Total Income

The total income of a household is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that household.

Total Income

Refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 1995 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total);
- net farm income;
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice;
- federal Child Tax benefits;
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement;
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan;
- benefits from Unemployment Insurance;
- other income from government sources;
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income;
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs;
- other money income.

Receipts Not Counted as Income

Gambling gains and losses, money inherited during the year, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property or personal belongings, income tax refunds, loans received, loans repaid to an individual as the lender, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates of property taxes and other taxes, and refunds of pension contributions were excluded as was all income 'in kind' such as free meals, living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average Income of Households

Average household income refers to the weighted mean total income of households.

Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of households (e.g., family households) by the number of households in that group, whether or not they reported income.

Median Income of Households

The median income of a specified group of households is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e. the incomes of the first half of households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median.

The median income of households is calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard Error of Average Income

Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be approximately two and a half standard errors.


Household, Private

Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.


Household Size

Refers to the number of persons in a private household.

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Footnote 227

Including loss.

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Footnote 228

Including loss.

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Footnote 229

Including loss.

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Footnote 230

Economic Family

Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.


Household, Private

Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.

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Footnote 231

Economic Family Status

Refers to the classification of population according to whether or not they are members of an economic family.

Economic family persons refers to two or more household members who are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption and thereby constitute an economic family.

Unattached individuals refers to household members who are not members of an economic family. A person living alone is always an unattached individual.

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Footnote 232

Economic Family Status

Refers to the classification of population according to whether or not they are members of an economic family.

Economic family persons refers to two or more household members who are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption and thereby constitute an economic family.

Unattached individuals refers to household members who are not members of an economic family. A person living alone is always an unattached individual.

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Footnote 233

Census Family Structure

Refers to the classification of census families into families of now-married couples (with or without never-married sons or daughters of either or both spouses), families of common-law couples (with or without never-married sons or daughters of either or both partners) and lone-parent families by sex of parent.


Census Family Status

Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not they are members of a census family.

Family persons refers to household members who belong to a census family. They, in turn, are further classified as follows:

Spouses refers to persons of opposite sex who are legally married to each other and living in the same dwelling.

Common-law partners are two persons of opposite sex who are not legally married to each other but live together as husband and wife in the same dwelling.

Lone parent refers to a mother or a father, with no spouse or common-law partner present, living in a dwelling with one or more never-married sons and/or daughters.

Never-married sons and/or daughters refers to blood, step or adopted sons and daughters who have never married (regardless of age) and are living in the same dwelling as their parent(s). Sons and daughters who are currently or were previously married, or who are living common-law, are not considered to be members of their parent(s)' census family even if they are living in the same dwelling. In addition, those never-married sons and daughters who do not live in the same dwelling as their parent(s) are not considered members of their parent(s)' census family.


Labour Market Activities: Labour Force Activity

Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Respondents were classified as either employed, unemployed or not in the labour force.

Employed

Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day:
(a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment; or
(b) were absent from their job or business for the entire week because of vacation, illness, a labour dispute at their place of work or other reasons.

Unemployed

Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, were without paid work and were available for work and either:
(a) had actively looked for work in the past four weeks; or
(b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or
(c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Not in Labour Force

Refers to those persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes persons who did not work for pay or in self-employment in the week prior to enumeration and (a) did not look for paid work in the four weeks prior to enumeration, (b) were not on temporary lay-off and (c) did not have a new job to start in four weeks or less. It also includes persons who looked for work during the last four weeks but were not available to start work in the week prior to enumeration.

Total Labour Force (in Reference Week)

Refers to all persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day.

Participation Rate

Refers to the total labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population in that group.

Employment-population Ratio

Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The employment-population ratio for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over in that group.

Unemployment Rate

Refers to the unemployed labour force expressed as a percentage of the total labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the total labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

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Footnote 234

Dwelling, Occupied Private

Refers to a private dwelling in which a person or a group of persons are permanently residing. Also included are private dwellings whose usual residents are temporarily absent on Census Day. Unless otherwise specified, all data in housing reports are for occupied private dwellings rather than unoccupied private dwellings or dwellings occupied solely by foreign and/or temporary residents.

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Footnote 235

Rooms

Refers to the number of rooms in a dwelling. A room is an enclosed area within a dwelling which is finished and suitable for year-round living.


Dwelling

Refers to a set of living quarters in which a person or a group of persons reside or could reside.

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Footnote 236

Users of 1996 Census data on Number of Bedrooms are cautioned that the counts for dwellings having no bedroom may be too high, due to the editing procedure used in processing the 1996 data. It is estimated that, at the national level, the counts for dwellings with no bedroom may be over-reported by 25%. These dwellings would have been classified as having one bedroom. The over-reporting is concentrated among dwellings with two rooms.


Bedrooms

Refers to all rooms designed and furnished as bedrooms and used mainly for sleeping purposes, even though the use may be occasional (i.e., spare bedroom).


Dwelling

Refers to a set of living quarters in which a person or a group of persons reside or could reside.

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Footnote 237

Value of Dwelling

Refers to the dollar amount expected by the owner if the dwelling were to be sold.


Dwelling

Refers to a set of living quarters in which a person or a group of persons reside or could reside.

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Footnote 238

Tenure

Refers to whether some member of the household owns or rents the dwelling, or whether the dwelling is Band housing (on an Indian reserve or settlement).

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Footnote 239

Tenure

Refers to whether some member of the household owns or rents the dwelling, or whether the dwelling is Band housing (on an Indian reserve or settlement).

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Footnote 240

Condition of Dwelling

Refers to whether, in the judgement of the respondent, the dwelling requires any repairs (excluding desirable remodelling or additions).

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Footnote 241

Condition of Dwelling

Refers to whether, in the judgement of the respondent, the dwelling requires any repairs (excluding desirable remodelling or additions).

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Footnote 242

Period of Construction

Refers to the period in time during which the building or dwelling was originally constructed.

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Footnote 243

Period of Construction

Refers to the period in time during which the building or dwelling was originally constructed.

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Footnote 244

Period of Construction

Refers to the period in time during which the building or dwelling was originally constructed.

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Footnote 245

Period of Construction

Refers to the period in time during which the building or dwelling was originally constructed.

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Footnote 246

Period of Construction

Refers to the period in time during which the building or dwelling was originally constructed.

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Footnote 247

Period of Construction

Refers to the period in time during which the building or dwelling was originally constructed.

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Footnote 248

Household, Private

Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.


Household Type

Refers to the basic division of private households into family and non-family households. Family household refers to a household that contains at least one census family, that is a married couple with or without never-married sons or daughters, or a couple living common-law with or without never-married sons or daughters, or a lone parent living with one or more never-married sons or daughters (lone-parent family). One-family household refers to a single census family (with or without other non-family persons) that occupies a private dwelling. Multiple-family household refers to one in which two or more census families (with or without additional non-family persons) occupy the same private dwelling.

Non-family household refers to either one person living alone in a private dwelling or to a group of two or more people who share a private dwelling, but who do not constitute a census family.


Census Family

Refers to a now-married couple (with or without never-married sons and/or daughters of either or both spouses), a couple living common-law (with or without never-married sons and/or daughters of either or both partners) or a lone parent of any marital status, with at least one never-married son or daughter living in the same dwelling.


Census Family Status

Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not they are members of a census family.

Family persons refers to household members who belong to a census family. They, in turn, are further classified as follows:

Spouses refers to persons of opposite sex who are legally married to each other and living in the same dwelling.

Common-law partners are two persons of opposite sex who are not legally married to each other but live together as husband and wife in the same dwelling.

Lone parent refers to a mother or a father, with no spouse or common-law partner present, living in a dwelling with one or more never-married sons and/or daughters.

Never-married sons and/or daughters refers to blood, step or adopted sons and daughters who have never married (regardless of age) and are living in the same dwelling as their parent(s). Sons and daughters who are currently or were previously married, or who are living common-law, are not considered to be members of their parent(s)' census family even if they are living in the same dwelling. In addition, those never-married sons and daughters who do not live in the same dwelling as their parent(s) are not considered members of their parent(s)' census family.

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Footnote 249

Household, Private

Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.

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Footnote 250

Rent, Gross

Refers to the total average monthly payments paid by tenant households to secure shelter.

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Footnote 251

Gross Rent as a Percentage of Household Income

Refers to the proportion of average monthly 1995 total household income which is spent on gross rent (for tenant-occupied dwellings). Calculation - Gross Rent X 100 ÷ Total annual household income in 1995 ÷ 12.

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Footnote 252

Owner's Major Payments

Refers to the total average monthly payments made by owner households to secure shelter.

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Footnote 253

Owner's Major Payments or Gross Rent as a Percentage of Household Income

Refers to the proportion of average monthly 1995 total household income which is spent on owner's major payments (in the case of owner-occupied dwellings) or on gross rent (in the case of tenant-occupied dwellings).

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Population, 1996 (100% data) Footnote 1 129,379
Total population by sex and age groups (100% data) Footnote 2 129,380
Male, total 63,455
0-4 4,690
5-9 5,120
10-14 4,965
15 950
16 920
17 915
18 870
19 885
15-19 4,540
20-24 4,185
25-29 4,145
30-34 5,225
35-39 5,665
40-44 5,305
45-49 5,475
50-54 3,750
55-59 2,920
60-64 2,500
65-69 1,950
70-74 1,410
75-79 815
80-84 485
85+ 305
Female, total 65,920
0-4 4,470
5-9 4,820
10-14 4,620
15 960
16 835
17 845
18 890
19 855
15-19 4,380
20-24 3,945
25-29 4,560
30-34 5,810
35-39 6,550
40-44 6,040
45-49 5,520
50-54 3,575
55-59 2,705
60-64 2,385
65-69 2,140
70-74 1,795
75-79 1,200
80-84 815
85+ 595
Total population 15 years and over by legal marital status (100% data) Footnote 3 100,695
Never married (single) 28,085
Legally married (and not separated) 60,860
Separated, but still legally married 2,455
Divorced 4,540
Widowed 4,750
Total number of census families in private households by family size (20% sample data) Footnote 4 35,245
Size of census family, 2 persons 11,605
Size of census family, 3 persons 8,010
Size of census family, 4 persons 10,495
Size of census family, 5 or more persons 5,130
Total husband-wife families by family structure (20% sample data) Footnote 5 31,715
Total families of now-married couples 29,975
Total without sons and/or daughters at home 8,680
Total with sons and/or daughters at home 21,295
1 son or daughter 6,490
2 sons and/or daughters 9,845
3 or more sons and/or daughters 4,965
Total families of common-law couples 1,740
Total without sons and/or daughters at home 960
Total with sons and/or daughters at home 780
1 son or daughter 440
2 sons and/or daughters 240
3 or more sons and/or daughters 95
Total lone-parent families by sex of parent (20% sample data) Footnote 6 3,530
Male parent 590
1 son or daughter 375
2 sons and/or daughters 130
3 or more sons and/or daughters 90
Female parent 2,940
1 son or daughter 1,590
2 sons and/or daughters 950
3 or more sons and/or daughters 395
Total number of never-married sons and/or daughters at home (20% sample data) 49,210
Under 6 years of age 10,975
6 - 14 years 17,400
15 - 17 years 5,380
18 - 24 years 10,025
25 years and over 5,435
Average number of never-married sons and/or daughters at home per census family Footnote 7 1.4
Total number of persons in private households (20% sample data) Footnote 8 128,795
Number of non-family persons 12,620
Living with relatives Footnote 9 4,465
Living with non-relatives only Footnote 10 2,660
Living alone 5,490
Number of family persons 116,175
Average number of persons per census family 3.3
Total number of persons 65 years and over (20% sample data) Footnote 11 11,125
Number of non-family persons 65 years and over 3,890
Living with relatives Footnote 12 1,685
Living with non-relatives only Footnote 13 215
Living alone 1,990
Number of family persons 65 years and over 7,235
Total number of occupied private dwellings by structural type of dwelling (20% sample data) Footnote 14 40,220
Single-detached house 28,475
Semi-detached house 905
Row house 2,360
Apartment, detached duplex 1,045
Apartment building, five or more storeys 4,810
Apartment building, less than five storeys 2,585
Other single attached house 40
Movable dwelling Footnote 15 0
Total number of private households by household size (20% sample data) Footnote 16 40,225
1 person 5,490
2 persons 9,965
3 persons 7,330
4 - 5 persons 14,705
6 or more persons 2,730
Total population by citizenship (20% sample data) Footnote 17 128,915
Canadian citizenship 113,640
Citizenship other than Canadian 15,280
Total population by place of birth (20% sample data) Footnote 18 128,920
Non-immigrant population Footnote 19 78,430
Born in province of residence 71,035
Total immigrants by selected countries of birth Footnote 20 49,515
United Kingdom 4,545
Italy 5,395
United States 1,070
Hong Kong 12,495
India 1,250
China, People's Republic of 4,365
Poland 590
Philippines 820
Germany 1,030
Portugal 435
Viet Nam 225
Netherlands 560
Jamaica 1,045
Greece 1,290
Guyana 385
Sri Lanka 195
Lebanon 235
France 140
Trinidad and Tobago 685
Yugoslavia Footnote 21 350
Hungary 400
Haiti 0
Taiwan 515
Iran Footnote 22 1,130
Romania 235
Korea, South Footnote 23 550
Ukraine 215
Pakistan 355
El Salvador 60
Egypt 215
Croatia 225
Russian Federation 495
Ireland, Republic of (Eire) 255
South Africa, Republic of 435
Mexico 85
Austria 220
Chile 110
Belgium 65
Fiji 0
Morocco 135
Denmark Footnote 24 85
Czechoslovakia, n.i.e. Footnote 25 105
Malaysia 215
Cambodia Footnote 26 70
Switzerland 125
Tanzania, United Republic of 385
Kenya 505
Iraq 235
Somalia 35
Israel 710
All other places of birth 4,215
Non-permanent residents Footnote 27 970
Total recent immigrants by selected countries of birth (20% sample data) Footnote 28 12,850
Hong Kong 6,650
China, People's Republic of 2,185
India 130
Philippines 365
Sri Lanka 70
Poland 60
Taiwan 220
Viet Nam 0
United States 250
United Kingdom 210
Yugoslavia Footnote 29 15
Iran Footnote 30 505
Jamaica 110
Lebanon 30
Romania 50
Pakistan 125
Korea, South Footnote 31 105
Guyana 10
Trinidad and Tobago 135
El Salvador 20
Somalia 30
France 0
Haiti 0
Russian Federation 180
Iraq 120
Portugal 0
Bosnia and Herzegovina 15
Mexico 0
Germany 40
Egypt 0
Ukraine 60
Ghana 15
Ethiopia Footnote 32 0
South Africa, Republic of 10
Bangladesh 0
Afghanistan 10
Peru 10
Guatemala 0
Fiji 0
Morocco 10
All other places of birth 1,080
Total immigrant population by period of immigration (20% sample data) Footnote 33 49,520
Before 1961, period of immigration 7,670
1961-1970, period of immigration 8,335
1971-1980, period of immigration 9,055
1981-1990, period of immigration 11,605
1991-1996, period of immigration Footnote 34 12,850
Total immigrant population by age at immigration (20% sample data) Footnote 35 49,520
0-4 years, age at immigration 4,280
5-19 years, age at immigration 14,970
20 years and over, age at immigration 30,275
Total population by mother tongue (20% sample data) Footnote 36 128,920
Single responses 126,790
English 79,245
French 1,295
Non-official languages 46,245
Italian 7,875
Chinese 20,255
German 1,740
Portuguese 555
Polish 535
Ukrainian 275
Spanish 885
Dutch 620
Punjabi 325
Greek 1,645
Arabic 905
Tagalog (Pilipino) 500
Hungarian 605
Vietnamese 80
Cree 0
Persian (Farsi) 1,160
Croatian 310
Gujarati 805
Korean 640
Russian 940
Hindi 380
Tamil 150
Japanese 100
Creoles 55
Finnish 305
Czech 140
Armenian 455
Yiddish 140
Urdu 410
Inuktitut (Eskimo) 0
Romanian 155
Ojibway 0
Danish 80
Slovak 85
Macedonian 455
Khmer (Cambodian) 55
Norwegian 0
Hebrew 520
Estonian 140
Swedish 10
Lao 25
Lithuanian 35
Serbian 70
Latvian (Lettish) 110
Slovenian 105
Turkish 175
Bengali 115
Maltese 45
Flemish 10
Montagnais-Naskapi 0
Bulgarian 75
Micmac 0
Gaelic languages 0
South Slave 0
Chipewyan 0
Dogrib 0
Kutchin-Gwich'in (Loucheux) 0
Tlingit 0
Serbo-Croatian 20
Dakota/Sioux 0
Malay-Bahasa 100
Blackfoot 0
Malayalam 90
Thai 10
Kurdish 35
Pashto 0
Other languages Footnote 37 910
Multiple responses 2,125
English and French 165
English and non-official language 1,870
French and non-official language 85
English, French and non-official language 10
Total population by knowledge of official languages (20% sample data) Footnote 38 128,915
English only 114,700
French only 30
English and French 9,545
Neither English nor French 4,645
Total population by first official language spoken (20% sample data) Footnote 39 128,915
English 122,130
French 1,305
English and French 915
Neither English nor French 4,565
Official language minority - (number) Footnote 40 1,765
Official language minority - (percentage) Footnote 41 1.4
Total population by home language (20% sample data) Footnote 42 128,920
Single responses 125,260
English 96,395
French 460
Non-official languages 28,405
Chinese 17,985
Italian 2,530
Portuguese 195
Spanish 495
German 315
Polish 215
Punjabi 190
Greek 690
Vietnamese 55
Arabic 520
Cree 0
Tagalog (Pilipino) 185
Ukrainian 20
Persian (Farsi) 875
Korean 405
Hungarian 230
Tamil 55
Gujarati 330
Croatian 75
Armenian 310
Inuktitut (Eskimo) 0
Hindi 180
Urdu 185
Japanese 40
Russian 535
Creoles 0
Dutch 15
Khmer (Cambodian) 95
Ojibway 0
Romanian 30
Czech 40
Lao 0
Macedonian 175
Finnish 105
Montagnais-Naskapi 0
Hebrew 325
Yiddish 15
Serbian 35
Bengali 50
Slovak 10
Estonian 30
Turkish 100
Lithuanian 0
Latvian (Lettish) 25
Micmac 0
Slovenian 40
Bulgarian 25
Serbo-Croatian 25
Dakota/Sioux 0
South Slave 0
Malay-Bahasa 55
Maltese 10
Blackfoot 0
Dogrib 0
Danish 0
Swedish 15
Malayalam 15
Thai 0
Kurdish 30
Pashto 0
Flemish 0
Chipewyan 0
Kutchin-Gwich'in (Loucheux) 0
Norwegian 0
Gaelic languages 0
Tlingit 0
Other languages Footnote 43 505
Multiple responses 3,660
English and French 100
English and non-official language 3,525
French and non-official language 10
English, French and non-official language 20
Knowledge of non-official languages (20% sample data): Italian Footnote 44 11,235
German 2,920
Chinese 21,700
Spanish 1,985
Portuguese 730
Ukrainian 405
Polish 695
Dutch 790
Punjabi 580
Arabic 1,340
Greek 2,400
Tagalog (Pilipino) 680
Vietnamese 145
Hindi 1,120
Hungarian 715
Cree 0
Russian 1,230
Gujarati 1,300
Yiddish 350
Hebrew 1,490
Urdu 715
Creoles 60
Persian (Farsi) 1,325
Croatian 400
Japanese 260
Korean 745
Tamil 165
Finnish 345
Armenian 525
Romanian 240
Ojibway 0
Czech 185
Danish 85
Non-verbal languages 135
Inuktitut (Eskimo) 0
Turkish 460
Macedonian 775
Slovak 75
Khmer (Cambodian) 95
Swedish 55
Swahili 415
Norwegian 10
Lao 25
Malay-Bahasa 240
Serbian 105
Lithuanian 55
Estonian 165
Latvian (Lettish) 140
Bengali 115
Maltese 60
Flemish 10
Slovenian 95
Gaelic languages 20
Sinhalese 65
Montagnais-Naskapi 0
Serbo-Croatian 25
Thai 15
Micmac 0
Blackfoot 0
Bulgarian 95
Malayalam 90
Dakota/Sioux 0
South Slave 0
Icelandic 10
Nishga 0
Frisian 10
Chipewyan 0
Kutchin-Gwich'in (Loucheux) 0
Tlingit 0
Dogrib 0
Kurdish 30
Pashto 0
Other languages Footnote 45 1,410
Total population by Aboriginal groups and non-Aboriginal population (20% sample data) Footnote 46 128,915
Total Aboriginal population 270
North American Indian single response Footnote 47 190
Métis single response 55
Inuit single response 20
Multiple Aboriginal responses 0
Other Aboriginal response Footnote 48 0
Total non-Aboriginal population 128,645
Total population by ethnic origin (single and multiple responses) (20% sample data) Footnote 49 128,915
Total population - Single responses Footnote 50 89,640
Total population - Multiple responses Footnote 51 39,280
Canadian - Total responses Footnote 52 23,990
Canadian - Single responses Footnote 53 10,070
Canadian - Multiple responses Footnote 54 13,920
French - Total responses 6,530
French - Single responses 870
French - Multiple responses 5,660
English - Total responses 29,225
English - Single responses 9,355
English - Multiple responses 19,870
Chinese - Total responses Footnote 55 23,635
Chinese - Single responses Footnote 56 22,155
Chinese - Multiple responses Footnote 57 1,480
Italian - Total responses 18,155
Italian - Single responses 14,060
Italian - Multiple responses 4,095
German - Total responses 7,860
German - Single responses 2,075
German - Multiple responses 5,790
Scottish - Total responses 15,950
Scottish - Single responses 2,445
Scottish - Multiple responses 13,500
Irish - Total responses 13,460
Irish - Single responses 1,800
Irish - Multiple responses 11,655
East Indian - Total responses Footnote 58 4,695
East Indian - Single responses Footnote 59 3,705
East Indian - Multiple responses Footnote 60 990
North American Indian - Total responses 680
North American Indian - Single responses 95
North American Indian - Multiple responses 590
Ukrainian - Total responses 2,045
Ukrainian - Single responses 635
Ukrainian - Multiple responses 1,410
Dutch (Netherlands) - Total responses Footnote 61 3,345
Dutch (Netherlands) - Single responses Footnote 62 1,190
Dutch (Netherlands) - Multiple responses Footnote 63 2,155
Polish - Total responses 3,220
Polish - Single responses 780
Polish - Multiple responses 2,440
Portuguese - Total responses 1,530
Portuguese - Single responses 810
Portuguese - Multiple responses 715
Filipino - Total responses 1,065
Filipino - Single responses 840
Filipino - Multiple responses 225
Jewish - Total responses 6,920
Jewish - Single responses 4,155
Jewish - Multiple responses 2,760
Greek - Total responses 3,180
Greek - Single responses 2,365
Greek - Multiple responses 805
Jamaican - Total responses Footnote 64 1,470
Jamaican - Single responses Footnote 65 950
Jamaican - Multiple responses Footnote 66 515
Vietnamese - Total responses 185
Vietnamese - Single responses 115
Vietnamese - Multiple responses 75
Hungarian (Magyar) - Total responses 1,340
Hungarian (Magyar) - Single responses 610
Hungarian (Magyar) - Multiple responses 735
Lebanese - Total responses 305
Lebanese - Single responses 140
Lebanese - Multiple responses 165
Spanish - Total responses 855
Spanish - Single responses 245
Spanish - Multiple responses 610
Haitian - Total responses Footnote 67 0
Haitian - Single responses Footnote 68 0
Haitian - Multiple responses Footnote 69 0
Korean - Total responses 870
Korean - Single responses 765
Korean - Multiple responses 105
Québécois - Total responses 10
Québécois - Single responses 0
Québécois - Multiple responses 0
Croatian - Total responses 535
Croatian - Single responses 345
Croatian - Multiple responses 190
Iranian - Total responses 1,385
Iranian - Single responses 1,230
Iranian - Multiple responses 155
Japanese - Total responses 445
Japanese - Single responses 250
Japanese - Multiple responses 195
Métis - Total responses 105
Métis - Single responses 35
Métis - Multiple responses 70
Norwegian - Total responses 270
Norwegian - Single responses 20
Norwegian - Multiple responses 250
Russian - Total responses 1,355
Russian - Single responses 320
Russian - Multiple responses 1,040
British, n.i.e. - Total responses Footnote 70 870
British, n.i.e. - Single responses Footnote 71 280
British, n.i.e. - Multiple responses Footnote 72 595
Romanian - Total responses 355
Romanian - Single responses 140
Romanian - Multiple responses 215
Danish - Total responses 375
Danish - Single responses 100
Danish - Multiple responses 270
Finnish - Total responses 675
Finnish - Single responses 340
Finnish - Multiple responses 330
Inuit - Total responses 15
Inuit - Single responses 10
Inuit - Multiple responses 10
Arab, n.i.e. - Total responses Footnote 73 315
Arab, n.i.e. - Single responses Footnote 74 225
Arab, n.i.e. - Multiple responses Footnote 75 90
Sri Lankan - Total responses 95
Sri Lankan - Single responses 55
Sri Lankan - Multiple responses 40
Belgian - Total responses 160
Belgian - Single responses 40
Belgian - Multiple responses 120
West Indian - Total responses Footnote 76 430
West Indian - Single responses Footnote 77 275
West Indian - Multiple responses Footnote 78 155
Swedish - Total responses 480
Swedish - Single responses 45
Swedish - Multiple responses 440
Punjabi - Total responses 140
Punjabi - Single responses 100
Punjabi - Multiple responses 40
African (Black), n.i.e. - Total responses Footnote 79 605
African (Black), n.i.e. - Single responses Footnote 80 225
African (Black), n.i.e. - Multiple responses Footnote 81 375
Serbian - Total responses 135
Serbian - Single responses 75
Serbian - Multiple responses 55
Somali - Total responses Footnote 82 65
Somali - Single responses Footnote 83 65
Somali - Multiple responses Footnote 84 0
Austrian - Total responses 695
Austrian - Single responses 230
Austrian - Multiple responses 465
Yugoslav, n.i.e. - Total responses Footnote 85 390
Yugoslav, n.i.e. - Single responses Footnote 86 155
Yugoslav, n.i.e. - Multiple responses Footnote 87 235
Black - Total responses Footnote 88 230
Black - Single responses Footnote 89 115
Black - Multiple responses Footnote 90 115
Welsh - Total responses 1,295
Welsh - Single responses 140
Welsh - Multiple responses 1,155
Pakistani - Total responses 205
Pakistani - Single responses 150
Pakistani - Multiple responses 55
South Asian, n.i.e. - Total responses Footnote 91 170
South Asian, n.i.e. - Single responses Footnote 92 155
South Asian, n.i.e. - Multiple responses Footnote 93 15
Armenian - Total responses 675
Armenian - Single responses 525
Armenian - Multiple responses 150
Czech - Total responses 310
Czech - Single responses 115
Czech - Multiple responses 190
Egyptian - Total responses 210
Egyptian - Single responses 175
Egyptian - Multiple responses 35
Chilean - Total responses 115
Chilean - Single responses 10
Chilean - Multiple responses 100
Swiss - Total responses 540
Swiss - Single responses 135
Swiss - Multiple responses 400
Trinidadian/Tobagonian - Total responses Footnote 94 375
Trinidadian/Tobagonian - Single responses Footnote 95 190
Trinidadian/Tobagonian - Multiple responses Footnote 96 190
Guyanese - Total responses Footnote 97 305
Guyanese - Single responses Footnote 98 85
Guyanese - Multiple responses Footnote 99 215
American - Total responses 1,015
American - Single responses 90
American - Multiple responses 925
Latin/Central/South American, n.i.e. - Total responses Footnote 100 55
Latin/Central/South American, n.i.e. - Single responses Footnote 101 10
Latin/Central/South American, n.i.e. - Multiple responses Footnote 102 45
Slovak - Total responses 215
Slovak - Single responses 135
Slovak - Multiple responses 80
Salvadorean - Total responses 25
Salvadorean - Single responses 25
Salvadorean - Multiple responses 0
Macedonian - Total responses 955
Macedonian - Single responses 600
Macedonian - Multiple responses 355
Acadian - Total responses 35
Acadian - Single responses 0
Acadian - Multiple responses 35
Tamil - Total responses 35
Tamil - Single responses 15
Tamil - Multiple responses 25
Cambodian - Total responses 30
Cambodian - Single responses 30
Cambodian - Multiple responses 0
Slovenian - Total responses 140
Slovenian - Single responses 75
Slovenian - Multiple responses 60
Maltese - Total responses 205
Maltese - Single responses 75
Maltese - Multiple responses 130
Laotian - Total responses 0
Laotian - Single responses 0
Laotian - Multiple responses 0
Ethiopian - Total responses Footnote 103 0
Ethiopian - Single responses Footnote 104 0
Ethiopian - Multiple responses Footnote 105 0
Ghanaian - Total responses Footnote 106 85
Ghanaian - Single responses Footnote 107 20
Ghanaian - Multiple responses Footnote 108 65
Lithuanian - Total responses 250
Lithuanian - Single responses 30
Lithuanian - Multiple responses 215
Afghan - Total responses 0
Afghan - Single responses 0
Afghan - Multiple responses 0
Icelandic - Total responses 70
Icelandic - Single responses 10
Icelandic - Multiple responses 65
Estonian - Total responses 335
Estonian - Single responses 160
Estonian - Multiple responses 175
Turk - Total responses 260
Turk - Single responses 195
Turk - Multiple responses 70
Latvian - Total responses 190
Latvian - Single responses 120
Latvian - Multiple responses 75
Barbadian - Total responses Footnote 109 145
Barbadian - Single responses Footnote 110 70
Barbadian - Multiple responses Footnote 111 70
Syrian - Total responses 20
Syrian - Single responses 0
Syrian - Multiple responses 20
Czechoslovakian - Total responses Footnote 112 175
Czechoslovakian - Single responses Footnote 113 45
Czechoslovakian - Multiple responses Footnote 114 125
Mexican - Total responses 30
Mexican - Single responses 20
Mexican - Multiple responses 10
Peruvian - Total responses 70
Peruvian - Single responses 50
Peruvian - Multiple responses 20
Moroccan - Total responses 145
Moroccan - Single responses 0
Moroccan - Multiple responses 145
Iraqi - Total responses 255
Iraqi - Single responses 185
Iraqi - Multiple responses 70
Bosnian - Total responses 20
Bosnian - Single responses 15
Bosnian - Multiple responses 0
Palestinian - Total responses 380
Palestinian - Single responses 265
Palestinian - Multiple responses 120
Scandinavian, n.i.e. - Total responses Footnote 115 60
Scandinavian, n.i.e. - Single responses Footnote 116 10
Scandinavian, n.i.e. - Multiple responses Footnote 117 50
Caribbean, n.i.e. - Total responses Footnote 118 60
Caribbean, n.i.e. - Single responses Footnote 119 15
Caribbean, n.i.e. - Multiple responses Footnote 120 40
European, n.i.e. - Total responses Footnote 121 90
European, n.i.e. - Single responses Footnote 122 35
European, n.i.e. - Multiple responses Footnote 123 55
Bulgarian - Total responses 125
Bulgarian - Single responses 65
Bulgarian - Multiple responses 55
Guatemalan - Total responses 15
Guatemalan - Single responses 0
Guatemalan - Multiple responses 10
Bangladeshi - Total responses 0
Bangladeshi - Single responses 0
Bangladeshi - Multiple responses 0
Taiwanese - Total responses Footnote 124 75
Taiwanese - Single responses Footnote 125 25
Taiwanese - Multiple responses Footnote 126 45
Colombian - Total responses 30
Colombian - Single responses 25
Colombian - Multiple responses 0
Eritrean - Total responses Footnote 127 0
Eritrean - Single responses Footnote 128 0
Eritrean - Multiple responses Footnote 129 0
Fijian - Total responses 0
Fijian - Single responses 0
Fijian - Multiple responses 0
Ecuadorian - Total responses 40
Ecuadorian - Single responses 25
Ecuadorian - Multiple responses 15
Algerian - Total responses 0
Algerian - Single responses 0
Algerian - Multiple responses 0
Nigerian - Total responses Footnote 130 85
Nigerian - Single responses Footnote 131 10
Nigerian - Multiple responses Footnote 132 75
Hispanic - Total responses 55
Hispanic - Single responses 60
Hispanic - Multiple responses 0
Total - Total population by visible minority population 128,915
Total visible minority population Footnote 133 37,065
Black 3,020
South Asian 4,820
Chinese 23,180
Korean 825
Japanese 385
Southeast Asian 330
Filipino 880
Arab/West Asian 2,135
Latin American 450
Visible minority, n.i.e. Footnote 134 560
Multiple visible minority Footnote 135 475
All others Footnote 136 91,850
Total population 15 years and over by labour force activity (20% sample data) Footnote 137 100,245
In the labour force 68,740
Employed 64,505
Unemployed 4,235
Not in the labour force 31,505
Participation rate 68.6
Employment-population ratio 64.3
Unemployment rate 6.2
Total population 15-24 years by labour force activity (20% sample data) 17,045
In the labour force 9,335
Employed 8,180
Unemployed 1,150
Not in the labour force 7,715
Participation rate 54.8
Employment-population ratio 48.0
Unemployment rate 12.3
Total population 25 years and over by labour force activity (20% sample data) 83,200
In the labour force 59,405
Employed 56,320
Unemployed 3,080
Not in the labour force 23,795
Participation rate 71.4
Employment-population ratio 67.7
Unemployment rate 5.2
Males 15 years and over by labour force activity (20% sample data) Footnote 138 48,585
In the labour force 36,380
Employed 34,235
Unemployed 2,145
Not in the labour force 12,200
Participation rate 74.9
Employment-population ratio 70.5
Unemployment rate 5.9
Males 15-24 years by labour force activity (20% sample data) 8,930
In the labour force 4,730
Employed 4,160
Unemployed 575
Not in the labour force 4,195
Participation rate 53.0
Employment-population ratio 46.6
Unemployment rate 12.2
Males 25 years and over by labour force activity (20% sample data) 39,650
In the labour force 31,650
Employed 30,075
Unemployed 1,575
Not in the labour force 8,005
Participation rate 79.8
Employment-population ratio 75.9
Unemployment rate 5.0
Females 15 years and over by labour force activity (20% sample data) Footnote 139 51,665
In the labour force 32,355
Employed 30,270
Unemployed 2,085
Not in the labour force 19,305
Participation rate 62.6
Employment-population ratio 58.6
Unemployment rate 6.4
Females 15-24 years by labour force activity (20% sample data) 8,115
In the labour force 4,600
Employed 4,025
Unemployed 575
Not in the labour force 3,515
Participation rate 56.7
Employment-population ratio 49.6
Unemployment rate 12.5
Females 25 years and over by labour force activity (20% sample data) 43,550
In the labour force 27,755
Employed 26,250
Unemployed 1,510
Not in the labour force 15,790
Participation rate 63.7
Employment-population ratio 60.3
Unemployment rate 5.4
Population 15 years and over in private households by presence of children and labour force activity (20% sample data) Footnote 140 100,130
In the labour force 68,665
Employed 64,445
Unemployed 4,225
Not in the labour force 31,460
Participation rate 68.6
Employment-population ratio 64.4
Unemployment rate 6.2
Population 15 years and over in private households with no children at home 52,445
In the labour force 31,425
Employed 28,950
Unemployed 2,470
Not in the labour force 21,025
Participation rate 59.9
Employment-population ratio 55.2
Unemployment rate 7.9
Population 15 years and over in private households with children at home 47,680
In the labour force 37,245
Employed 35,490
Unemployed 1,750
Not in the labour force 10,435
Participation rate 78.1
Employment-population ratio 74.4
Unemployment rate 4.7
Population 15 years and over in private households with children under 6 years only 8,885
In the labour force 7,370
Employed 7,060
Unemployed 305
Not in the labour force 1,510
Participation rate 82.9
Employment-population ratio 79.5
Unemployment rate 4.1
Population 15 years and over in private households with children under 6 years and children 6 years and over 6,660
In the labour force 5,185
Employed 4,950
Unemployed 230
Not in the labour force 1,480
Participation rate 77.9
Employment-population ratio 74.3
Unemployment rate 4.4
Population 15 years and over in private households with children 6 years and over only 32,135
In the labour force 24,690
Employed 23,475
Unemployed 1,215
Not in the labour force 7,440
Participation rate 76.8
Employment-population ratio 73.1
Unemployment rate 4.9
Males 15 years and over in private households by presence of children and labour force activity (20% sample data) Footnote 141 48,515
In the labour force 36,340
Employed 34,195
Unemployed 2,145
Not in the labour force 12,175
Participation rate 74.9
Employment-population ratio 70.5
Unemployment rate 5.9
Males 15 years and over in private households with no children at home 25,845
In the labour force 16,535
Employed 15,155
Unemployed 1,380
Not in the labour force 9,310
Participation rate 64.0
Employment-population ratio 58.6
Unemployment rate 8.3
Males 15 years and over in private households with children at home 22,665
In the labour force 19,800
Employed 19,040
Unemployed 760
Not in the labour force 2,860
Participation rate 87.4
Employment-population ratio 84.0
Unemployment rate 3.8
Males 15 years and over in private households with children under 6 years only 4,290
In the labour force 4,060
Employed 3,955
Unemployed 110
Not in the labour force 230
Participation rate 94.6
Employment-population ratio 92.2
Unemployment rate 2.7
Males 15 years and over in private households with children under 6 years and children 6 years and over 3,220
In the labour force 3,030
Employed 2,920
Unemployed 110
Not in the labour force 190
Participation rate 94.1
Employment-population ratio 90.7
Unemployment rate 3.6
Males 15 years and over in private households with children 6 years and over only 15,155
In the labour force 12,710
Employed 12,165
Unemployed 545
Not in the labour force 2,450
Participation rate 83.9
Employment-population ratio 80.3
Unemployment rate 4.3
Females 15 years and over in private households by presence of children and labour force activity (20% sample data) Footnote 142 51,615
In the labour force 32,330
Employed 30,250
Unemployed 2,080
Not in the labour force 19,285
Participation rate 62.6
Employment-population ratio 58.6
Unemployment rate 6.4
Females 15 years and over in private households with no children at home 26,600
In the labour force 14,890
Employed 13,800
Unemployed 1,090
Not in the labour force 11,715
Participation rate 56.0
Employment-population ratio 51.9
Unemployment rate 7.3
Females 15 years and over in private households with children at home 25,010
In the labour force 17,445
Employed 16,450
Unemployed 990
Not in the labour force 7,570
Participation rate 69.8
Employment-population ratio 65.8
Unemployment rate 5.7
Females 15 years and over in private households with children under 6 years only 4,590
In the labour force 3,305
Employed 3,105
Unemployed 195
Not in the labour force 1,285
Participation rate 72.0
Employment-population ratio 67.6
Unemployment rate 5.9
Females 15 years and over in private households with children under 6 years and children 6 years and over 3,440
In the labour force 2,150
Employed 2,030
Unemployed 125
Not in the labour force 1,290
Participation rate 62.5
Employment-population ratio 59.0
Unemployment rate 5.8
Females 15 years and over in private households with children 6 years and over only 16,975
In the labour force 11,980
Employed 11,315
Unemployed 670
Not in the labour force 4,995
Participation rate 70.6
Employment-population ratio 66.7
Unemployment rate 5.6
Total labour force 15 years and over by industry divisions (20% sample data) Footnote 143 68,740
Industry - Not applicable Footnote 144 1,640
All industries Footnote 145 67,095
Division A - Agricultural and related service industries 695
Division B - Fishing and trapping industries 0
Division C - Logging and forestry industries 50
Division D - Mining (including milling), quarrying and oil well industries 75
Division E - Manufacturing industries 8,615
Division F - Construction industries 4,790
Division G - Transportation and storage industries 1,860
Division H - Communication and other utility industries 2,205
Division I - Wholesale trade industries 5,585
Division J - Retail trade industries 8,800
Division K - Finance and insurance industries 4,630
Division L - Real estate operator and insurance agent industries 2,230
Division M - Business service industries 7,130
Division N - Government service industries Footnote 146 2,440
Division O - Educational service industries 4,225
Division P - Health and social service industries Footnote 147 5,345
Division Q - Accommodation, food and beverage service industries 3,135
Division R - Other service industries Footnote 148 5,285
Total labour force 15 years and over by occupational broad categories and occupation major groups (20% sample data) Footnote 149 68,740
Occupation - Not applicable Footnote 150 1,645
All occupations Footnote 151 67,095
A Management occupations 10,350
A0 Senior management occupations 1,785
A1 Specialist managers 2,765
A2 Managers in retail trade, food and accommodation services 2,685
A3 Other managers n.e.c. 3,115
B Business, finance and administrative occupations 16,510
B0 Professional occupations in business and finance 2,180
B1 Finance and insurance administrative occupations 1,255
B2 Secretaries 2,000
B3 Administrative and regulatory occupations 1,810
B4 Clerical supervisors 570
B5 Clerical occupations 8,685
C Natural and applied sciences and related occupations 4,495
C0 Professional occupations in natural and applied sciences 3,180
C1 Technical occupations related to natural and applied sciences 1,315
D Health occupations 2,910
D0 Professional occupations in health 1,090
D1 Nurse supervisors and registered nurses 880
D2 Technical and related occupations in health 590
D3 Assisting occupations in support of health services 355
E Occupations in social science, education, government service and religion 4,475
E0 Judges, lawyers, psychologists, social workers, ministers of religion, and policy and program officers 1,530
E1 Teachers and professors 2,425
E2 Paralegals, social services workers and occupations in education and religion n.e.c. 520
F Occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport 1,785
F0 Professional occupations in art and culture 530
F1 Technical occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport 1,260
G Sales and service occupations 16,030
G0 Sales and service supervisors 220
G1 Wholesale, technical, insurance, real estate sales specialists, and retail, wholesale and grain buyers 3,680
G2 Retail salespersons and sales clerks 3,095
G3 Cashiers 1,045
G4 Chefs and cooks 595
G5 Occupations in food and beverage service 855
G6 Occupations in protective services 665
G7 Occupations in travel and accommodation including attendants in recreation and sport 500
G8 Childcare and home support workers 1,370
G9 Sales and service occupations n.e.c. 4,000
H Trades, transport and equipment operators and related occupations 6,665
H0 Contractors and supervisors in trades and transportation 830
H1 Construction trades 1,065
H2 Stationary engineers, power station operators and electrical trades and telecommunications occupations 515
H3 Machinists, metal forming, shaping and erecting occupations 350
H4 Mechanics 1,000
H5 Other trades n.e.c. 580
H6 Heavy equipment and crane operators including drillers 180
H7 Transportation equipment operators and related workers, excluding labourers 1,415
H8 Trades helpers, construction, and transportation labourers and related occupations 735
I Occupations unique to primary industry 1,260
I0 Occupations unique to agriculture excluding labourers 720
I1 Occupations unique to forestry operations, mining, oil and gas extraction, and fishing, excluding labourers 20
I2 Primary production labourers 520
J Occupations unique to processing, manufacturing and utilities 2,605
J0 Supervisors in manufacturing 305
J1 Machine operators in manufacturing 1,130
J2 Assemblers in manufacturing 670
J3 Labourers in processing, manufacturing and utilities 500
Male labour force 15 years and over by occupational broad categories and occupation major groups (20% sample data) Footnote 152 36,385
Occupation - Not applicable Footnote 153 715
All occupations Footnote 154 35,670
A Management occupations 7,250
A0 Senior management occupations 1,420
A1 Specialist managers 1,815
A2 Managers in retail trade, food and accommodation services 1,760
A3 Other managers n.e.c. 2,250
B Business, finance and administrative occupations 4,735
B0 Professional occupations in business and finance 1,315
B1 Finance and insurance administrative occupations 260
B2 Secretaries 25
B3 Administrative and regulatory occupations 530
B4 Clerical supervisors 235
B5 Clerical occupations 2,365
C Natural and applied sciences and related occupations 3,535
C0 Professional occupations in natural and applied sciences 2,420
C1 Technical occupations related to natural and applied sciences 1,115
D Health occupations 925
D0 Professional occupations in health 660
D1 Nurse supervisors and registered nurses 35
D2 Technical and related occupations in health 185
D3 Assisting occupations in support of health services 40
E Occupations in social science, education, government service and religion 1,695
E0 Judges, lawyers, psychologists, social workers, ministers of religion, and policy and program officers 830
E1 Teachers and professors 730
E2 Paralegals, social services workers and occupations in education and religion n.e.c. 130
F Occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport 890
F0 Professional occupations in art and culture 240
F1 Technical occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport 655
G Sales and service occupations 7,700
G0 Sales and service supervisors 130
G1 Wholesale, technical, insurance, real estate sales specialists, and retail, wholesale and grain buyers 2,400
G2 Retail salespersons and sales clerks 1,385
G3 Cashiers 125
G4 Chefs and cooks 385
G5 Occupations in food and beverage service 265
G6 Occupations in protective services 545
G7 Occupations in travel and accommodation including attendants in recreation and sport 170
G8 Childcare and home support workers 50
G9 Sales and service occupations n.e.c. 2,245
H Trades, transport and equipment operators and related occupations 6,125
H0 Contractors and supervisors in trades and transportation 770
H1 Construction trades 1,035
H2 Stationary engineers, power station operators and electrical trades and telecommunications occupations 505
H3 Machinists, metal forming, shaping and erecting occupations 345
H4 Mechanics 990
H5 Other trades n.e.c. 480
H6 Heavy equipment and crane operators including drillers 180
H7 Transportation equipment operators and related workers, excluding labourers 1,175
H8 Trades helpers, construction, and transportation labourers and related occupations 645
I Occupations unique to primary industry 1,060
I0 Occupations unique to agriculture excluding labourers 585
I1 Occupations unique to forestry operations, mining, oil and gas extraction, and fishing, excluding labourers 15
I2 Primary production labourers 455
J Occupations unique to processing, manufacturing and utilities 1,755
J0 Supervisors in manufacturing 235
J1 Machine operators in manufacturing 785
J2 Assemblers in manufacturing 450
J3 Labourers in processing, manufacturing and utilities 285
Female labour force 15 years and over by occupational broad categories and occupation major groups (20% sample data) Footnote 155 32,355
Occupation - Not applicable Footnote 156 930
All occupations Footnote 157 31,430
A Management occupations 3,100
A0 Senior management occupations 360
A1 Specialist managers 960
A2 Managers in retail trade, food and accommodation services 925
A3 Other managers n.e.c. 860
B Business, finance and administrative occupations 11,775
B0 Professional occupations in business and finance 865
B1 Finance and insurance administrative occupations 1,000
B2 Secretaries 1,975
B3 Administrative and regulatory occupations 1,280
B4 Clerical supervisors 335
B5 Clerical occupations 6,320
C Natural and applied sciences and related occupations 960
C0 Professional occupations in natural and applied sciences 765
C1 Technical occupations related to natural and applied sciences 200
D Health occupations 1,985
D0 Professional occupations in health 425
D1 Nurse supervisors and registered nurses 845
D2 Technical and related occupations in health 400
D3 Assisting occupations in support of health services 310
E Occupations in social science, education, government service and religion 2,785
E0 Judges, lawyers, psychologists, social workers, ministers of religion, and policy and program officers 700
E1 Teachers and professors 1,695
E2 Paralegals, social services workers and occupations in education and religion n.e.c. 395
F Occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport 895
F0 Professional occupations in art and culture 285
F1 Technical occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport 610
G Sales and service occupations 8,330
G0 Sales and service supervisors 95
G1 Wholesale, technical, insurance, real estate sales specialists, and retail, wholesale and grain buyers 1,285
G2 Retail salespersons and sales clerks 1,710
G3 Cashiers 920
G4 Chefs and cooks 205
G5 Occupations in food and beverage service 595
G6 Occupations in protective services 125
G7 Occupations in travel and accommodation including attendants in recreation and sport 325
G8 Childcare and home support workers 1,315
G9 Sales and service occupations n.e.c. 1,760
H Trades, transport and equipment operators and related occupations 535
H0 Contractors and supervisors in trades and transportation 65
H1 Construction trades 30
H2 Stationary engineers, power station operators and electrical trades and telecommunications occupations 10
H3 Machinists, metal forming, shaping and erecting occupations 0
H4 Mechanics 10
H5 Other trades n.e.c. 90
H6 Heavy equipment and crane operators including drillers 0
H7 Transportation equipment operators and related workers, excluding labourers 240
H8 Trades helpers, construction, and transportation labourers and related occupations 90
I Occupations unique to primary industry 200
I0 Occupations unique to agriculture excluding labourers 135
I1 Occupations unique to forestry operations, mining, oil and gas extraction, and fishing, excluding labourers 0
I2 Primary production labourers 65
J Occupations unique to processing, manufacturing and utilities 855
J0 Supervisors in manufacturing 70
J1 Machine operators in manufacturing 345
J2 Assemblers in manufacturing 225
J3 Labourers in processing, manufacturing and utilities 215
Total labour force 15 years and over by class of worker (20% sample data) Footnote 158 68,740
Class of worker - Not applicable Footnote 159 1,640
All classes of worker Footnote 160 67,095
Paid workers 60,215
Employees 54,750
Self-employed (incorporated) 5,460
Without paid help 1,810
With paid help 3,650
Self-employed (unincorporated) 6,420
Without paid help 4,175
With paid help 2,245
Unpaid family workers 465
Male labour force 15 years and over by class of worker (20% sample data) Footnote 161 36,380
Class of worker - Not applicable Footnote 162 715
All classes of worker Footnote 163 35,670
Paid workers 31,205
Employees 27,115
Self-employed (incorporated) 4,085
Without paid help 1,310
With paid help 2,775
Self-employed (unincorporated) 4,315
Without paid help 2,600
With paid help 1,710
Unpaid family workers 150
Female labour force 15 years and over by class of worker (20% sample data) Footnote 164 32,355
Class of worker - Not applicable Footnote 165 930
All classes of worker Footnote 166 31,425
Paid workers 29,010
Employees 27,635
Self-employed (incorporated) 1,380
Without paid help 500
With paid help 875
Self-employed (unincorporated) 2,110
Without paid help 1,570
With paid help 540
Unpaid family workers 310
Population 15 years and over by hours of unpaid housework (20% sample data) Footnote 167 100,245
No hours of housework 13,225
Less than 5 hours of housework 25,305
5 to 14 hours of housework 29,915
15 to 29 hours of housework 18,255
30 to 59 hours of housework 9,525
60 or more hours of housework 4,010
Males 15 years and over by hours of unpaid housework (20% sample data) Footnote 168 48,585
No hours of housework 8,385
Less than 5 hours of housework 16,085
5 to 14 hours of housework 15,715
15 to 29 hours of housework 6,105
30 to 59 hours of housework 1,785
60 or more hours of housework 510
Females 15 years and over by hours of unpaid housework (20% sample data) Footnote 169 51,660
No hours of housework 4,845
Less than 5 hours of housework 9,225
5 to 14 hours of housework 14,195
15 to 29 hours of housework 12,155
30 to 59 hours of housework 7,740
60 or more hours of housework 3,505
Population 15 years and over by hours of unpaid childcare (20% sample data) Footnote 170 100,245
No hours of childcare 59,325
Less than 5 hours of childcare 10,265
5 to 14 hours of childcare 11,470
15 to 29 hours of childcare 7,540
30 to 59 hours of childcare 5,710
60 or more hours of childcare 5,940
Males 15 years and over by hours of unpaid childcare (20% sample data) Footnote 171 48,585
No hours of childcare 30,525
Less than 5 hours of childcare 5,925
5 to 14 hours of childcare 6,185
15 to 29 hours of childcare 3,295
30 to 59 hours of childcare 1,645
60 or more hours of childcare 1,000
Females 15 years and over by hours of unpaid childcare (20% sample data) Footnote 172 51,665
No hours of childcare 28,795
Less than 5 hours of childcare 4,335
5 to 14 hours of childcare 5,285
15 to 29 hours of childcare 4,240
30 to 59 hours of childcare 4,065
60 or more hours of childcare 4,935
Population 15 years and over by hours of unpaid care to seniors (20% sample data) Footnote 173 100,250
No hours of care to seniors 83,955
Less than 5 hours of care to seniors 10,420
5 to 9 hours of care to seniors 3,470
10 or more hours of care to seniors 2,405
Males 15 years and over by hours of unpaid care to seniors (20% sample data) Footnote 174 48,585
No hours of care to seniors 41,820
Less than 5 hours of care to seniors 4,735
5 to 9 hours of care to seniors 1,220
10 or more hours of care to seniors 805
Females 15 years and over by hours of unpaid care to seniors (20% sample data) Footnote 175 51,660
No hours of care to seniors 42,135
Less than 5 hours of care to seniors 5,680
5 to 9 hours of care to seniors 2,250
10 or more hours of care to seniors 1,595
Total employed labour force 15 years and over by place of work status (20% sample data) Footnote 176 64,505
Males 34,235
Usual place of work 27,265
At home 2,585
Outside Canada 390
No fixed workplace 3,995
Females 30,270
Usual place of work 26,285
At home 2,685
Outside Canada 130
No fixed workplace 1,170
Total employed labour force 15 years and over by mode of transportation (20% sample data) Footnote 177 58,710
Males with usual place of work or no fixed workplace 31,260
Car, truck, van as driver 26,900
Car, truck, van as passenger 1,290
Public transit 2,240
Walked to work 580
Bicycle 145
Motorcycle 0
Taxicab 20
Other method 75
Females with usual place of work or no fixed workplace 27,455
Car, truck, van as driver 20,150
Car, truck, van as passenger 2,575
Public transit 3,425
Walked to work 1,025
Bicycle 30
Motorcycle 0
Taxicab 35
Other method 210
Total population, 15 to 24 years by school attendance (20% sample data) Footnote 178 17,045
Not attending school 4,060
Attending school full-time 12,235
Attending school part-time 745
Total population 15 years and over by highest level of schooling (20% sample data) Footnote 179 100,245
Less than grade 9 Footnote 180 8,155
Grades 9 to 13 32,445
Without secondary school graduation certificate 19,185
With secondary school graduation certificate 13,265
Trades certificate or diploma 3,250
Other non-university education only Footnote 181 23,610
Without certificate or diploma 6,130
With certificate or diploma Footnote 182 17,480
University 32,785
Without degree 11,695
Without certificate or diploma 6,015
With certificate or diploma Footnote 183 5,680
With bachelor's degree or higher 21,095
Males with postsecondary qualifications by major field of study (20% sample data) Footnote 184 24,500
Educational, recreational and counselling services 955
Fine and applied arts 970
Humanities and related fields 1,075
Social sciences and related fields 2,610
Commerce, management and business administration 5,595
Agricultural and biological sciences/technologies 820
Engineering and applied sciences 2,680
Engineering and applied science technologies and trades 6,785
Health professions, sciences and technologies 1,205
Mathematics and physical sciences 1,785
No specialization and all other, n.e.c. 20
Females with postsecondary qualifications by major field of study (20% sample data) Footnote 185 23,000
Educational, recreational and counselling services 3,315
Fine and applied arts 1,690
Humanities and related fields 1,705
Social sciences and related fields 2,765
Commerce, management and business administration 7,320
Agricultural and biological sciences/technologies 805
Engineering and applied sciences 335
Engineering and applied science technologies and trades 910
Health professions, sciences and technologies 3,155
Mathematics and physical sciences 990
No specialization and all other, n.e.c. 10
Total by mobility status 1 year ago (20% sample data) Footnote 186 127,335
Non-movers 111,195
Movers 16,140
Non-migrants 6,415
Migrants 9,720
Internal migrants 7,355
Intraprovincial migrants 6,930
Interprovincial migrants 425
External migrants 2,365
Total by mobility status 5 years ago (20% sample data) Footnote 187 119,725
Non-movers 62,810
Movers 56,920
Non-migrants 19,420
Migrants 37,500
Internal migrants 26,450
Intraprovincial migrants 25,240
Interprovincial migrants 1,210
External migrants 11,050
All persons with employment income by work activity (20% sample data) Footnote 188 69,955
Average employment income $ 35,246
Standard error of average employment income $ 789
Worked full year, full time Footnote 189 39,855
Average employment income $ 48,191
Standard error of average employment income $ 1,350
Worked part year or part time Footnote 190 28,245
Average employment income $ 18,264
Standard error of average employment income $ 317
Males with employment income by work activity (20% sample data) Footnote 191 36,900
Average employment income $ 43,369
Standard error of average employment income $ 1,474
Worked full year, full time Footnote 192 23,375
Average employment income $ 56,083
Standard error of average employment income $ 2,283
Worked part year or part time Footnote 193 12,725
Average employment income $ 21,575
Standard error of average employment income $ 604
Females with employment income by work activity (20% sample data) Footnote 194 33,055
Average employment income $ 26,177
Standard error of average employment income $ 255
Worked full year, full time Footnote 195 16,480
Average employment income $ 36,997
Standard error of average employment income $ 353
Worked part year or part time Footnote 196 15,520
Average employment income $ 15,550
Standard error of average employment income $ 289
Total - Composition of total income % (20% sample data) Footnote 197 100.0
Employment income % 83.6
Government transfer payments % 7.3
Other % 9.1
Total income of population 15 years and over (20% sample data) Footnote 198 100,245
Without income 8,845
With income 91,400
Under $1,000 Footnote 199 6,165
$ 1,000 - $ 2,999 4,405
$ 3,000 - $ 4,999 4,010
$ 5,000 - $ 6,999 4,035
$ 7,000 - $ 9,999 4,910
$10,000 - $11,999 3,900
$12,000 - $14,999 5,290
$15,000 - $19,999 7,160
$20,000 - $24,999 6,690
$25,000 - $29,999 6,495
$30,000 - $34,999 6,690
$35,000 - $39,999 5,990
$40,000 - $44,999 4,845
$45,000 - $49,999 3,660
$50,000 - $59,999 5,905
$60,000 and over 11,260
Average income $ Footnote 200 32,270
Median income $ Footnote 201 24,103
Standard error of average income $ Footnote 202 631
Total income of males 15 years and over (20% sample data) 48,580
Without income 2,745
With income 45,840
Under $1,000 Footnote 203 2,900
$ 1,000 - $ 2,999 1,775
$ 3,000 - $ 4,999 1,675
$ 5,000 - $ 6,999 1,650
$ 7,000 - $ 9,999 1,940
$10,000 - $11,999 1,435
$12,000 - $14,999 2,030
$15,000 - $19,999 3,080
$20,000 - $24,999 3,065
$25,000 - $29,999 2,720
$30,000 - $34,999 3,220
$35,000 - $39,999 2,995
$40,000 - $44,999 2,955
$45,000 - $49,999 2,165
$50,000 - $59,999 3,650
$60,000 and over 8,570
Average income $ Footnote 204 40,477
Median income $ Footnote 205 30,321
Standard error of average income $ Footnote 206 1,233
Total income of females 15 years and over (20% sample data) 51,660
Without income 6,100
With income 45,565
Under $1,000 Footnote 207 3,265
$ 1,000 - $ 2,999 2,630
$ 3,000 - $ 4,999 2,340
$ 5,000 - $ 6,999 2,390
$ 7,000 - $ 9,999 2,970
$10,000 - $11,999 2,470
$12,000 - $14,999 3,260
$15,000 - $19,999 4,080
$20,000 - $24,999 3,620
$25,000 - $29,999 3,770
$30,000 - $34,999 3,470
$35,000 - $39,999 2,995
$40,000 - $44,999 1,885
$45,000 - $49,999 1,490
$50,000 - $59,999 2,250
$60,000 and over 2,690
Average income $ Footnote 208 24,012
Median income $ Footnote 209 19,037
Standard error of average income $ Footnote 210 219
Census family income of all families (20% sample data) Footnote 211 35,250
Under $10,000 Footnote 212 2,150
$ 10,000 - $19,999 2,080
$ 20,000 - $29,999 2,750
$ 30,000 - $39,999 3,255
$ 40,000 - $49,999 3,390
$ 50,000 - $59,999 3,605
$ 60,000 - $69,999 3,065
$ 70,000 - $79,999 3,115
$ 80,000 - $89,999 2,430
$ 90,000 - $99,999 1,930
$100,000 and over 7,470
Average family income $ 74,526
Median family income $ 61,005
Standard error of average family income $ 1,651
Census family income of husband-wife families (20% sample data) Footnote 213 31,715
Under $10,000 Footnote 214 1,635
$ 10,000 - $19,999 1,555
$ 20,000 - $29,999 2,255
$ 30,000 - $39,999 2,755
$ 40,000 - $49,999 2,935
$ 50,000 - $59,999 3,265
$ 60,000 - $69,999 2,870
$ 70,000 - $79,999 2,950
$ 80,000 - $89,999 2,345
$ 90,000 - $99,999 1,855
$100,000 and over 7,280
Average family income $ 78,323
Median family income $ 64,910
Standard error of average family income $ 1,831
All census families (20% sample data) Footnote 215 35,250
Average family income $ 74,526
Standard error of average family income $ 1,651
Husband-wife families 31,715
Average family income $ 78,323
Standard error of average family income $ 1,831
Male lone-parent families 590
Average family income $ 52,027
Standard error of average family income $ 2,890
Female lone-parent families 2,940
Average family income $ 38,090
Standard error of average family income $ 1,151
Total income of non-family persons 15 years and over (20% sample data) Footnote 216 12,330
Under $1,000 Footnote 217 1,095
$ 1,000 - $ 2,999 260
$ 3,000 - $ 4,999 285
$ 5,000 - $ 6,999 420
$ 7,000 - $ 9,999 495
$10,000 - $11,999 1,110
$12,000 - $14,999 1,185
$15,000 - $19,999 1,335
$20,000 - $24,999 945
$25,000 - $29,999 895
$30,000 - $34,999 865
$35,000 - $39,999 865
$40,000 - $44,999 670
$45,000 - $49,999 350
$50,000 - $59,999 655
$60,000 and over 885
Average income $ 25,999
Median income $ 19,895
Standard error of average income $ 459
Total income of male non-family persons 15 years and over (20% sample data) 4,920
Under $1,000 Footnote 218 345
$ 1,000 - $ 2,999 110
$ 3,000 - $ 4,999 150
$ 5,000 - $ 6,999 195
$ 7,000 - $ 9,999 245
$10,000 - $11,999 260
$12,000 - $14,999 320
$15,000 - $19,999 440
$20,000 - $24,999 320
$25,000 - $29,999 330
$30,000 - $34,999 415
$35,000 - $39,999 375
$40,000 - $44,999 410
$45,000 - $49,999 170
$50,000 - $59,999 315
$60,000 and over 515
Average income $ 30,479
Median income $ 25,910
Standard error of average income $ 888
Total income of female non-family persons 15 years and over (20% sample data) 7,405
Under $1,000 Footnote 219 750
$ 1,000 - $ 2,999 150
$ 3,000 - $ 4,999 130
$ 5,000 - $ 6,999 225
$ 7,000 - $ 9,999 250
$10,000 - $11,999 850
$12,000 - $14,999 865
$15,000 - $19,999 895
$20,000 - $24,999 625
$25,000 - $29,999 565
$30,000 - $34,999 450
$35,000 - $39,999 490
$40,000 - $44,999 255
$45,000 - $49,999 180
$50,000 - $59,999 340
$60,000 and over 370
Average income $ 23,022
Median income $ 16,626
Standard error of average income $ 471
Total - Economic families (20% sample data) Footnote 220 34,095
Low income 4,610
Other 29,490
Incidence of low income % Footnote 221 13.5
Total - Unattached individuals (20% sample data) Footnote 222 8,060
Low income 2,600
Other 5,460
Incidence of low income % Footnote 223 32.3
Total - Population in private households (20% sample data) Footnote 224 128,700
Low income 20,025
Other 108,680
Incidence of low income % Footnote 225 15.6
Household income of all private households (20% sample data) Footnote 226 40,220
Under $10,000 Footnote 227 2,075
$ 10,000 - $19,999 3,230
$ 20,000 - $29,999 3,415
$ 30,000 - $39,999 3,935
$ 40,000 - $49,999 3,600
$ 50,000 - $59,999 3,890
$ 60,000 - $69,999 3,425
$ 70,000 - $79,999 3,275
$ 80,000 - $89,999 2,730
$ 90,000 - $99,999 2,110
$100,000 and over 8,520
Average household income $ 73,272
Median household income $ 59,712
Standard error of average household income $ 1,457
Household income of one person households (20% sample data) 5,490
Under $10,000 Footnote 228 485
$ 10,000 - $19,999 1,600
$ 20,000 - $29,999 970
$ 30,000 - $39,999 870
$ 40,000 - $49,999 550
$ 50,000 - $59,999 400
$ 60,000 - $69,999 280
$ 70,000 - $79,999 160
$ 80,000 - $89,999 40
$ 90,000 - $99,999 30
$100,000 and over 110
Average household income $ 32,177
Median household income $ 26,383
Standard error of average household income $ 770
Household income of two or more person households (20% sample data) 34,730
Under $10,000 Footnote 229 1,590
$ 10,000 - $19,999 1,635
$ 20,000 - $29,999 2,445
$ 30,000 - $39,999 3,065
$ 40,000 - $49,999 3,055
$ 50,000 - $59,999 3,495
$ 60,000 - $69,999 3,145
$ 70,000 - $79,999 3,115
$ 80,000 - $89,999 2,695
$ 90,000 - $99,999 2,080
$100,000 and over 8,405
Average household income $ 79,771
Median household income $ 66,497
Standard error of average household income $ 1,674
Total number of economic families in private households (20% sample data) Footnote 230 34,100
Size of economic family, 2 persons 9,735
Size of economic family, 3 persons 7,245
Size of economic family, 4 persons 9,850
Size of economic family, 5 or more persons 7,270
Total number of persons in economic families Footnote 231 120,635
Average number of persons per economic family 3.5
Total number of unattached individuals Footnote 232 8,155
Total number of census families in private households by number and status of family members in the labour force (20% sample data) Footnote 233 35,245
Number of now-married and common-law couple families 31,715
No member in the labour force 4,235
Some members in the labour force 27,475
One member only 5,710
Two or more members 21,765
Both spouses/partners in the labour force 19,985
Number of lone-parent families 3,530
No member in the labour force 620
Some members in the labour force 2,915
Parent in labour force 2,270
Total number of occupied private dwellings (20% sample data) Footnote 234 40,220
Average number of rooms per dwelling Footnote 235 7.3
Average number of bedrooms per dwelling Footnote 236 3.2
Average value of dwelling $ Footnote 237 312,747
Owned Footnote 238 30,805
Rented Footnote 239 9,420
Band housing 0
Regular maintenance only 29,775
Minor repairs Footnote 240 8,580
Major repairs Footnote 241 1,870
Period of construction, before 1946 Footnote 242 2,390
Period of construction, 1946-1960 Footnote 243 5,435
Period of construction, 1961-1970 Footnote 244 3,845
Period of construction, 1971-1980 Footnote 245 5,005
Period of construction, 1981-1990 Footnote 246 15,730
Period of construction, 1991-1996 Footnote 247 7,810
Total number of private households by household type (20% sample data) Footnote 248 40,225
One-family households 31,715
Multiple-family households 1,735
Non-family households 6,770
Number of persons in private households (20% sample data) Footnote 249 128,790
Average number of persons in private households 3.2
Tenant one-family households without additional persons 5,390
Average gross rent $ Footnote 250 874
Gross rent spending 30% or more of household income on shelter costs Footnote 251 3,815
Owner one-family households without additional persons 22,660
Average owner's major payments $ Footnote 252 1,250
Owner's major payments spending 30% or more of household income on shelter costs Footnote 253 8,440

Source: Statistics Canada, 1996 Census of Population, Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 95F0180XDB96001.

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