2011 National Household Survey: Data tables

Tabulation: Household Income in 2010 (38), Household Type (9) and Selected Household Characteristics (18) for Private Households of Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2011 National Household Survey

Data table

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This table details household income in 2010 , household type and selected household characteristics for private households in New Brunswick / Nouveau-Brunswick
Global non-response rate (GNR)Footnote 2 = 28.6 %
Household income in 2010 (38) Household type (9)
Total - Household typeFootnote 3 Census-family households One-family-only householdsFootnote 4 Couple-family householdsFootnote 5 Without children With children Lone-parent-family households Other family householdsFootnote 6 Non-census-family households
Total - Household total incomeFootnote 7 314,035 220,030 204,265 176,195 94,755 81,440 28,070 15,760 94,005
Under $5,000 7,525 3,145 3,010 2,410 1,690 715 595 130 4,385
$5,000 to $9,999 8,810 2,230 2,045 1,210 460 750 835 185 6,580
$10,000 to $14,999 10,215 3,600 3,470 1,745 1,050 700 1,725 135 6,610
$15,000 to $19,999 21,975 5,430 5,150 2,305 1,330 970 2,845 285 16,540
$20,000 to $29,999 34,195 16,905 16,320 11,040 8,885 2,155 5,280 590 17,285
$30,000 to $39,999 34,570 21,545 20,845 16,345 12,535 3,815 4,490 710 13,025
$40,000 to $49,999 31,325 21,745 20,405 16,985 10,760 6,220 3,420 1,340 9,580
$50,000 to $59,999 28,415 22,230 21,005 18,220 11,015 7,205 2,785 1,225 6,185
$60,000 to $79,999 46,335 38,835 35,750 32,430 18,225 14,200 3,320 3,085 7,495
$80,000 to $99,999 33,270 29,770 27,080 25,650 11,990 13,665 1,425 2,695 3,495
$100,000 to $124,999 25,830 24,165 21,980 21,130 8,365 12,770 850 2,180 1,670
$125,000 to $149,999 14,430 13,955 12,520 12,280 4,325 7,955 245 1,440 475
$150,000 and over 17,130 16,455 14,705 14,455 4,130 10,325 250 1,755 675
Median household total income $ 52,835 66,431 65,115 70,808 59,732 85,653 36,582 81,089 26,854
Average household total income $ 64,725 77,439 76,457 81,751 69,758 95,704 43,226 90,166 34,965
Total - After-tax income of households 314,030 220,025 204,270 176,200 94,755 81,445 28,070 15,760 94,005
Under $5,000 7,610 3,190 3,055 2,460 1,710 745 600 135 4,415
$5,000 to $9,999 8,850 2,250 2,070 1,220 470 745 845 185 6,600
$10,000 to $14,999 10,685 3,655 3,515 1,785 1,085 705 1,730 140 7,030
$15,000 to $19,999 23,070 5,565 5,285 2,430 1,395 1,035 2,855 280 17,505
$20,000 to $29,999 38,275 17,810 17,165 11,625 9,400 2,230 5,535 650 20,465
$30,000 to $39,999 40,375 25,130 24,400 19,230 14,660 4,570 5,165 735 15,245
$40,000 to $49,999 37,810 28,740 27,230 23,090 14,500 8,590 4,145 1,510 9,070
$50,000 to $59,999 32,205 26,825 25,260 22,615 13,550 9,060 2,650 1,560 5,385
$60,000 to $79,999 50,595 45,185 41,170 38,240 19,365 18,875 2,930 4,015 5,410
$80,000 to $99,999 29,765 28,055 25,445 24,410 9,945 14,465 1,035 2,615 1,710
$100,000 and over 34,790 33,620 29,670 29,100 8,675 20,420 575 3,950 1,170
$100,000 to $124,999 19,595 18,955 16,905 16,540 5,320 11,215 365 2,055 640
$125,000 and over 15,195 14,665 12,765 12,560 3,350 9,205 205 1,895 530
Median after-tax household income $ 47,354 58,821 57,519 61,710 52,781 73,997 34,962 73,133 24,808
Average after-tax household income $ 55,329 65,983 64,950 69,064 59,421 80,284 39,122 79,369 30,391
Total - Income status in 2010 based on after-tax low-income measureFootnote 8 314,035 220,030 204,265 176,200 94,755 81,440 28,070 15,765 94,005
Households for the income status based on after-tax low-income measure 311,135 217,990 202,620 175,200 94,425 80,780 27,415 15,370 93,140
Low-income households 65,840 31,105 29,315 18,260 10,065 8,195 11,055 1,785 34,740
Prevalence of low income among households % 21.2 14.3 14.5 10.4 10.7 10.1 40.3 11.6 37.3
Other households 245,290 186,890 173,305 156,940 84,360 72,585 16,360 13,585 58,400
Concept not applicableFootnote 9 2,900 2,035 1,645 995 335 660 650 385 865

Symbol(s)

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not available for a specific reference period

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not applicable

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suppressed to meet the confidentiality requirements of the Statistics Act

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too unreliable to be published

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Footnote(s)

Footnote 1

Household, private - Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy the same private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. Household members who are temporarily absent on May 10, 2011 (e.g., temporarily residing elsewhere) are considered as part of their usual household. Every person is a member of one and only one household.

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Footnote 2

For the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) estimates, the global non-response rate (GNR) is used as an indicator of data quality. This indicator combines complete non-response (household) and partial non-response (question) into a single rate. The value of the GNR is presented to users. A smaller GNR indicates a lower risk of non-response bias and as a result, lower risk of inaccuracy. The threshold used for estimates' suppression is a GNR of 50% or more. For more information, please refer to the National Household Survey User Guide, 2011.

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Footnote 3

Household type - Refers to the basic division of private households into family and non-family households. Family household refers to a household that contains at least one census family, that is, a married couple with or without children, or a couple living common law with or without children, or a lone parent living with one or more children (lone-parent family). One-family household refers to a single census family (with or without other persons) that occupies a private dwelling. Multiple-family household refers to a household in which two or more census families (with or without additional persons) occupy the same private dwelling. Family households may also be divided based on the presence of persons not in a census family.

Non-family household refers to either one person living alone in a private dwelling or to a group of two or more people who share a private dwelling, but who do not constitute a census family.

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Footnote 4

Refers to households that consist solely of one census family without additional persons.

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Footnote 5

Refers to households with opposite-sex or same-sex couples.

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Footnote 6

Refers to one-census-family households with additional persons and multiple-census-family households with or without additional persons.

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Footnote 7

Household total income - The total income of a household is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that household.

Total income - Total income refers to monetary receipts from certain sources, before income taxes and deductions, during calendar year 2010. It includes employment income from wages, salaries, tips, commissions and net income from self-employment (for both unincorporated farm and non-farm activities); income from government sources, such as social assistance, child benefits, employment insurance, Old Age Security pension, Canada or Quebec pension plan benefits and disability income; income from employer and personal pension sources, such as private pensions and payments from annuities and RRIFs; income from investment sources, such as dividends and interest on bonds, accounts, GICs and mutual funds; and other regular cash income, such as child support payments received, spousal support payments (alimony) received and scholarships. The monetary receipts included are those that tend to be of a regular and recurring nature. It excludes one-time receipts, such as lottery winnings, gambling winnings, cash inheritances, lump sum insurance settlements, capital gains and RRSP withdrawals. Capital gains are excluded because they are not by their nature regular and recurring. It is further assumed that they are less likely to be fully spent in the period in which they are received, unlike income that is regular and recurring. Also excluded are employer's contributions to registered pension plans, Canada and Quebec pension plans, and employment insurance. Finally, voluntary inter-household transfers, imputed rent, goods and services produced for barter, and goods produced for own consumption are excluded from this total income definition.

After-tax income of households - The after-tax income of a household is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that household.

After-tax income - Refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2010.

Median income of households - The median income of a specified group of households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Average income of households - Average income of households refers to the weighted mean total income of households in 2010. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of households (for example, two person households) by the number of households in that specific group, whether or not they reported income.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of households.

Household, private - Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy the same private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. Household members who are temporarily absent on May 10, 2011 (e.g., temporarily residing elsewhere) are considered as part of their usual household. Every person is a member of one and only one household.

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Footnote 8

Income status can be measured in several different ways in household surveys. For the standard products of the National Household Survey, the line chosen is a relative measure: the after-tax low-income measure (LIM-AT).

For this measure, the income used is after-tax income of households. There are no regional variations to account for prices or cost of living differences: all applicable households in Canada face the same line adjusted for household size. This line is set at half the median of adjusted household after-tax income. To account for potential economies of scale, the income of households with more than one member is divided by the square root of the size of the household.
All household members are considered to share the household income and are attributed the same income status.

Note:Low-income estimates in the 2011 National Household Survey

For the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS), low-income statistics are presented based on the after-tax low-income measure (LIM-AT). This measure is not related to the low-income cut-offs (LICO) presented in the 2006 Census and prevalence rates are conceptually not comparable. Because of the sensitivity of certain income indicators to differences in methodology and response patterns, direct comparisons to establish trends with low-income estimates from other household surveys, administrative programs or the 2006 Census are discouraged. The prevalence rates observed in the NHS at the national level are generally 1 to 2 percentage points higher than seen for similar concepts in other programs. However, analysis of the NHS data suggests that it is valid to compare low-income data for different sub-populations within the NHS (i.e., for different geographic areas or demographic groups). For more information, refer to the Income Reference Guide, National Household Survey, Catalogue no. 99-014-X2011006.

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Footnote 9

The low-income concepts are not applied in the territories and in certain areas based on census subdivision type (such as Indian reserves). The existence of substantial in-kind transfers (such as band housing) and sizeable barter economies or consumption from own production (such as product from hunting or fishing) could have made the interpretation of low-income rates more difficult.

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Source: Statistics Canada, 2011 National Household Survey, Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 99-014-X2011047.

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